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Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

.

Overview

The following table reconciles the Departmental minimum lease commitments disclosed in the entity’s 30 June 2019 annual financial statements to the amount of lease liabilities recognised on 1 July 2019:Objective of Wine Australia

Wine Australia is a corporate Commonwealth entity.

The objectives of Wine Australia are to:

  • coordinate or fund grape and wine research and development (R&D) and facilitate the dissemination, adoption and commercialisation of the results
  • control the export of wine from Australia, and
  • promote the sale and consumption of wine, both in Australia and overseas.

Our vision is for a prosperous Australian grape and wine community.

The basis of preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

  • Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and
  • Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian ccounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FRR, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of financial position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to Wine Australia or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the contingencies note.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified thathave a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

New Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of new Australian Accounting Standard requirements

All new standards, amendments to standards, revised standards, and interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period were adopted, with AASB 16 Leases being the only new standard to have a material impact on Wine Australia’s financial statements.

AASB 15, AASB 2016-8 and AASB 1058 became effective 1 July 2019.

Application of AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 1058 Income of Not-For-Profit Entities.

The Entity adopted AASB 15 and AASB 1058 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019.

Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under the various applicable AASBs and related interpretations.

Under the new income recognition model the Entity shall first determine whether an enforceable agreement exists and whether the promises to transfer goods or services to the customer are ‘sufficiently specific’.

If an enforceable agreement exists and the promises are ‘sufficiently specific’ (to a transaction or part of a transaction), the Entity applies the general AASB 15 principles to determine the appropriate revenue recognition. If these criteria are not met, the Entity shall consider whether AASB 1058 applies.

In relation to AASB 15, the Entity elected to apply the new standard to all new and uncompleted contracts from the date of initial application. The Entity is required to aggregate the effect of all of the contract modifications that occur before the date of initial application.

In terms of AASB 1058, the Entity is required to recognise volunteer services at fair value if those services would have been purchased if not provided voluntarily, and the fair value of those services can be measured reliably. AASB 1058 Income of Not-For-Profit Entities does not have a material impact on the revenue recognition of Wine Australia in the period.

AASB 16 became effective on 1 July 2019.

This new standard has replaced AASB 117 Leases, Interpretation 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease, Interpretation 115 Operating Leases—Incentives and Interpretation 127 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease.

AASB 16 provides a single lessee accounting model, requiring the recognition of assets and liabilities for all leases, together with options to exclude leases where the lease term is 12 months or less, or where the underlying asset is of low value. AASB 16 substantially carries forward the lessor accounting in AASB 117, with the distinction between operating leases and finance leases being retained. The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Application of AASB 16 Leases

The Entity adopted AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under AASB 117 and related interpretations.

The Entity elected to apply the practical expedient to not reassess whether a contract is, or contains a lease at the date of initial application. Contracts entered into before the transition date that were not identified as leases under AASB 117 were not reassessed.

The definition of a lease under AASB 16 was applied only to contracts entered into or changed on or after 1 July 2019.

AASB 16 provides for certain optional practical expedients, including those related to the initial adoption of the standard. The Entity applied the following practical expedients when applying AASB 16 to leases previously classified as operating leases under AASB 117:

  • Apply a single discount rate to a portfolio of leases with reasonably similar characteristics;
  • Exclude initial direct costs from the measurement of right-of-use assets at the date of initial application for leases where the right-of- use asset was determined as if AASB 16 had been applied since the commencement date;
  • Reliance on previous assessments on whether leases are onerous as opposed to preparing an impairment review under AASB 136 Impairment of assets as at the date of initial application; and
  • Applied the exemption not to recognise right-of-use assets and liabilities for leases with less than 12 months of lease term remaining as of the date of initial application.

As a lessee, the Entity previously classified leases as operating or finance leases based on its assessment of whether the lease transferred substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership. Under AASB 16, the Entity recognises right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for most leases. However, the Entity has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for some leases of low value assets based on the value of the underlying asset when new or for short-term leases with a lease term of 12 months or less.

On adoption of AASB 16, the Entity recognised right-of-use assets and lease liabilities in relation to leases of office space, which had previously been classified as operating leases.

The lease liabilities were measured at the present value of the remaining lease payments, discounted using the Entity’s incremental borrowing rate as at 1 July 2019. The Entity’s incremental borrowing rate is the rate at which a similar borrowing could be obtained from an independent creditor under comparable terms and conditions. The weighted-average rate applied was 0.99% p.a.

The right-of-use assets were measured as follows:

a) Office space: measured at an amount equal to the lease liability, adjusted by the amount of any prepaid or accrued lease payments.

b) All other leases: the carrying value that would have resulted from AASB 16 being applied from the commencement date of the leases, subject to the practical expedients noted above.

Impact on transition

On transition to AASB 16, the Entity recognised additional right-of-use assets and additional lease liabilities, recognising the difference in retained earnings. The impact on transition is summarised below:

Departmental

Departmental

1 July 2019

Right-of-use assets - property, plant and equipment

1,611,802

1,611,802

Retained earnings

-

The following table reconciles the Departmental minimum lease commitments disclosed in the entity’s 30 June 2019 annual financial statements to the amount of lease liabilities recognised on 1 July 2019:

1 July 2019

Minimum operating lease commitment

at 30 June 2019

3,036,025

Less: reassessment of operating lease commitments on transition

(962,769)

Less: early terminations

(277,977)

Less: lease variations

(183,477)

Lease liabilities recognised at 1 July 2019

1,611,802

Future Australian Accounting Standard requirements

With the exception of the above mentioned, no amendments to standards, revised standards and interpretations that have been issued by the AASB that are applicable to future reporting periods are expected to materially affect Wine Australia’s financial statements.

Taxation

Wine Australia is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST, except:

  • where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office, and
  • for receivables and trade creditor payables.

Events after the reporting period

The Wine Australia Board approved on 11 August 2020 for Wine Australia to become a founding member of Agricultural Innovation Investment Limited, which is a cross sectoral joint investment vehicle. The Wine Australia CEO, Andreas Clark, will be appointed as interim, non-executive director of Agricultural Innovation Investment Limited, pending the appointment of ongoing directors.

COVID – Impact of COVID-19 on operations

The COVID-19 outbreak was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. The outbreak and the response of governments in dealing with the pandemic is impacting the general activity levels within the community, the economy and to an extent the operations of Wine Australia. For the period to 30 June 2020, there has been no significant impact on operations, cash flow and financial condition. Events scheduled to occur in the period were postponed or rescheduled with refunds provided to wineries who had paid for participation. Wine Australia will continue to monitor developments and adapt its operations in response to future market conditions as they become known.

International Trade

China has commenced an anti-dumping investigation and a countervailing duties investigation into Australian wine in China. The China Alcoholic Drinks Association (CADA) requested the Chinese Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) to launch the investigations and MOFCOM commenced the anti-dumping investigation on 18 August 2020 and the countervailing duties investigation on 31 August 2020. In normal circumstances, the investigations could be expected to take 12 months, but they may be extended by a further 6 months. The year of investigation for determining dumping is calendar year 2019 and for determining injury to the Chinese domestic industry is calendar years 2015–2019. It is not possible to determine the effects of these actions on Wine Australia until they are completed.

Financial performance

This section analyses the financial performance of Wine Australia for the period ended 30 June 2020.

Note 1.1. Expenses (Accounting Policy – Expenses)

Research and development contracts

Most research and development (R&D) contracts require the research provider to perform services, provide facilities or meet eligibility criteria. In these cases, liabilities are recognised only to the extent that the services required have been performed or the eligibility criteria have been satisfied by the research provider.

In cases where R&D contracts are made without conditions to be monitored, liabilities relating to the financial year ending 30 June 2020 are recognised on signing of the contract.

Market research costs include data and contract work completed for our market insights program.

Grants

Grants are awarded after review of applications, with expense recognised when the grant criteria and/or obligations are met.

Employee benefits

Accounting policies for employee-related expenses are contained in the People and Relationships section.

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

Wine Australia has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). Wine Australia recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

Insurance

Wine Australia has insured for risks through the Government’s insurable risk managed fund, Comcover. Workers’ compensation is insured through Comcare.

Foreign currency

Transactions denominated in a foreign currency are converted at the exchange rate from the beginning of each month. Foreign currency receivables and payables are translated at the exchange rates current as at balance date. Associated currency gains and losses are brought to account in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Levy collection fees

The levy collection fee is a charge from the Department of Agrculture, Water and the Environment for the collection of various wine industry levies. The costs are recognised as an expense in the Statement of Comprehensive Income on a monthly basis.

2020

2019

Note 1.1A: Expenditure on research and development contracts

$

$

Public sector

Australian Government entities

3,777,375

3,873,828

State and territory governments

1,963,568

1,515,039

Universities/colleges

4,166,237

3,816,168

Private sector

The Australian Wine Research Institute

8,645,000

8,645,000

Other organisations

2,317,624

2,235,065

Market research costs

624,556

671,448

Rural R&D for Profit Program

948,339

2,357,015

Total expenditure on research and development contracts

22,442,699

23,113,563

2020

2019

Note 1.1B: Employee benefits

$

$

Wages and salaries

11,786,188

11,062,463

Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans

703,312

898,255

Defined benefit plans

131,072

129,725

Leave and other entitlements

382,585

226,777

Separation and redundancies

87,487

53,062

Total employee benefits

13,090,644

12,370,282

2020

2019

Note 1.1C: Suppliers

$

$

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Occupancy costs

207,212

216,399

Contractors

119,357

337,863

Communications

121,273

118,790

Information technology

1,928,127

1,857,481

Marketing costs

11,141,896

12,601,676

Outside services

377,507

645,952

Travel and accommodation

619,534

990,730

Goods purchased

-

153,815

Advertising

32,515

32,006

Professional fees

1,632,526

1,995,985

Publications and subscription

110,613

121,263

Postage and freight

105,633

130,774

Other supplier expenses

394,929

653,107

Total goods and services supplied or rendered

16,791,122

19,855,841

Other supplier

Operating lease rentals¹

-

1,034,416

Workers' compensation expenses (Comcare)

22,702

25,440

Liability insurance expenses (Comcover)

71,815

66,004

Total other supplier expenses

94,517

1,125,860

Total supplier expenses

16,885,639

20,981,701

1. Wine Australia has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Note 1.1D: Grants

2020

2019

$

$

State grants

1,382,000

2,440,000

Competitive grants

1,093,800

1,332,500

Wine Export grants

111,202

1,300,491

Tourism and cellar door grants

10,000,000

-

Total grants

12,587,002

5,072,991

Note 1.1E: Depreciation and amortisation

2020

2019

$

$

Depreciation:

Plant and equipment

174,915

183,963

Right-of-use assets and Leasehold improvements¹

1,037,949

28,881

Total depreciation

1,212,864

212,844

Amortisation:

Intangibles: computer software

452,062

194,007

Total amortisation

452,062

194,007

Total depreciation and amortisation

1,664,926

406,851

Note 1.2: Revenue (Accounting Policy – Revenue)

Industry contributions

Industry contributions are recognised as revenue to the extent they have been received into Wine Australia’s bank account or are entitled to be received by Wine Australia at year end.

Industry contributions comprise the:

Grape Research Levy – a levy imposed under schedule 13 of the Primary Industries (Excise) Levies Act 1999 in respect of fresh and dried grapes, and grape juice produced in Australia. This levy is collected and paid to Wine Australia by the Australian Government - Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment. The levy rate is $2 per tonne, of which 1.6 cents per tonne is paid directly to Plant Health Australia.

Wine Grapes Levy - a levy imposed under schedule 26 of the Primary Industries (Excise) Levies Act 1999 in respect of the manufacture of wine. The levy rate is stepped rate per tonne, of which 2.4 cents per tonne is paid directly to Plant Health Australia.

Wine Export Charge - a levy imposed under schedule 13 of the Primary Industries (Customs) Charges Act 1999 and calculated as a portion of the ‘free on board’ value of wine exported. This levy is collected by Wine Australia in accordance with a Collection Agreement entered into between Wine Australia and the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment in 2015, in accordance with section 11 of the Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection Act 1991.

Revenue from Government

The matching contribution from the Australian Government is provided to fund grape and wine research. It is equal to half of the expenditure of Wine Australia (excluding levy collection fees), but limited to 0.5 per cent of the estimated gross value of industry production and the cumulative total of industry contributions paid.

Other Australian Government grants are recognised when Wine Australia obtains control of the contribution or the right to receive the contribution, it is probable that the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to Wine Australia, and the amount of the contribution can be measured reliably.

Goods and services

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer.

The following is a description of principal activities from which Wine Australia generates its revenue: Wine Australia’s additional service income is Export Approval Service Fees and Marketing related activities.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which the Entity expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer. The consideration promised in a contract with a customer may include fixed amounts, variable amounts, or both.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Interest revenue

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method.

Rental income

Rental income arising from the sublease of a portion of the premises is recognised in revenue in the month that it relates.

The revenues described in this Note are revenues relating to Wine Australia’s core operating activities.

Note 1.2A: Industry contributions

2020

2019

$

$

Grape research levy

3,383,590

3,549,142

Wine research levy

11,902,720

12,555,177

Wine export charge

3,535,558

3,640,912

Total industry contributions

18,821,868

19,745,231

Note 1.2B: Sale of goods and rendering of services

2020

2019

$

$

Sale of goods

-

258,731

Rendering of services

7,240,204

8,397,060

Total sale of goods and rendering of services

7,240,204

8,655,791

Note 1.2C: Rental income

2020

2019

$

$

Operating lease

Sublease

156,986

185,000

Total rental income

156,986

185,000

Subleasing rental income commitments

Wine Australia subleases space to four tenants within the Adelaide head office.

Note 1.2C: Rental income (continued)

Commitments for sublease rental income receivables are as follows:

2020

2019

$

$

Within 1 year

151,671

202,228

Between 1 to 5 years

-

155,463

Total sublease rental income commitments

151,671

357,691

Note 1.2D: Research and development contributions

2020

2019

$

$

Rural R&D for Profit Program contributions from external sources

141,000

859,010

Collaboration projects

737,322

230,177

Other

82,500

80,000

Total research and development contributions and refunds

960,822

1,169,187

Note 1.2E: Interest

2020

2019

$

$

Term deposits at bank

153,644

424,366

Credit interest

40,206

86,994

Total interest

193,850

511,360

Note 1.2F: Other revenue

2020

2019

$

$

Other revenue

430

5,872

Total other revenue

430

5,872

Note 1.2G: Other grants from Government

2020

2019

$

$

Export and Regional Wine Support Package

16,062,000

15,924,000

Tourism and cellar door grants program

10,000,000

-

Rural R&D for Profit program

146,600

746,939

Export Market Development Grant

150,000

67,057

Total revenue from Government

26,358,600

16,737,996

Financial position

This section analyses Wine Australia’s assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

Note 2.1: Financial assets (Accounting Policy – Financial assets)

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes:

a) cash on hand;

b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value; and

c) cash in special accounts.

Trade and other receivables

Credit Terms for goods and services were within 30 days unless otherwise specified (2019: 30 days unless otherwise specified).

Financial assets

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Note 2.1A: Cash and cash equivalents

2020

2019

$

$

Cash at bank

4,991,998

3,142,545

Cash on hand

1,568

1,461

Total cash and cash equivalents

4,993,566

3,144,006

Note 2.1B: Trade and other receivables

2020

2019

$

$

Goods and services receivables

Services

577,198

1,235,875

Total goods and services receivables

577,198

1,235,875

Other receivables

Australian Government matching contributions receivable

693,565

2,104,356

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office

29,775

302,820

Industry contributions receivable

1,053,989

981,662

Interest receivable

121

6,039

Other receivable

24,206

22,925

Total other receivables

1,801,656

3,417,802

Total trade and other receivables (gross)

2,378,854

4,653,677

Refer to Note 1.2: Accounting Policy - Revenue.

Less impairment allowance

Goods and services

(11,669)

-

Total impairment allowance

(11,669)

-

Total trade and other receivables (net)

2,367,185

4,653,677

Trade and other receivables (net) aged as follows

Not overdue

2,285,014

4,578,877

Overdue by:

0 to 30 days

28,847

63,767

31 to 60 days

41,929

10,283

61 to 90 days

8,974

750

More than 90 days

2,421

-

Total trade and other receivables (net)

2,367,185

4,653,677

All trade and other receivables are expected to be settled within 12 months

All investments are current assets

Note 2.2: Non-financial assets (Accounting Policy – Non-financial assets)

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Asset recognition threshold – Minor Property Plant & Equipment

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $1,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘restoration’ provisions taken up by the entity where there exists an obligation to restore leased premises to original condition. The improvement costs are included in the value of the entity’s leasehold improvement with a corresponding provision for the ‘make good’ recognised.

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment is carried at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any.

No indicators of impairment were found for plant or equipment.

No material plant and equipment assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16, Wine Australia has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Wine Australia’s financial statements.

Depreciation/amortisation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to Wine Australia using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Asset class

2020

2019

Leasehold improvements

Lease term

Lease term

Plant and equipment

3 years

3 years

Intangibles

3 to 5 years

3 to 5 years

Furniture and fittings

10 years

10 years

The Depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment

All assets have been assessed internally for impairment as at 30 June 2020. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if Wine Australia was deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Intangibles

Wine Australia’s intangibles comprise internally developed software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the entity’s software are 3 to 5 years (2019: 3 to 5 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2020.

Prepayments

Prepayments are for goods or supplies that relate to future periods. They are expensed in the period of use.

Note 2.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles

Buildings (Right of Use)

Minor leasehold improvements

Minor plant and equipment

Computer Software

Total

$

$

$

$

$

As at 1 July 2019

Gross book value

-

1,013,721

1,036,867

5,438,860

7,489,448

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment

-

(913,386)

(755,076)

(1,685,381)

(3,353,843)

Total as at 1 July 2019

-

100,335

281,791

3,753,479

4,135,605

Recognition of right of use asset on initial application of AASB 16

1,611,802

-

-

-

1,611,802

Adjusted total as at 1 July 2019

1,611,802

100,335

281,791

3,753,479

5,747,407

Additions:

Purchase

-

-

10,867

-

10,867

Internally developed

-

-

-

1,184,225

1,184,225

Depreciation and amortisation

(47,780)

(174,914)

(452,062)

(674,756)

Depreciation on right-of-use assets

(990,169)

-

-

-

(990,169)

Disposals:

Gross book adjustment

-

-

(31,063)

(842,561)

(873,624)

Accumulated depreciation adjustment

-

-

31,063

842,521

873,584

Total as at 30 June 2020

621,633

52,555

117,744

4,485,602

5,277,534

Total as at 30 June 2020 represented by:

Gross book value

1,611,802

1,013,721

1,016,671

5,780,524

9,422,718

Accumulated depreciation and impairment

(990,169)

(961,166)

(898,927)

(1,294,922)

(4,145,184)

Total as at 30 June 2020

621,633

52,555

117,744

4,485,602

5,277,534

Internally developed software in 2019-20 is the capitalisation of the new Wine Australia wine export approval system.

Note 2.2B: Other non-financial assets

2020

2019

$

$

Prepayments

2,143,951

2,807,909

Total prepayments

2,143,951

2,807,909

Prepayments expected to be recovered

No more than 12 months

1,948,267

2,799,642

More than 12 months

195,684

8,267

Total prepayments

2,143,951

2,807,909

Note 2.3: Payables (Accounting Policy – Payables)

Suppliers and research and development contracts
All payables are expected to be settled within 12 months.
Settlement is usually made:

  • net 14 days for research and development contracts, and
  • net 30 days for all other suppliers.

Other payables
Other payables include marketing-related revenue for events invoiced in advance.

Note 2.3A: Research and development contracts

2020

2019

$

$

Accrued approved project expenses

645,756

307,007

Total research and development contracts

645,756

307,007

All research and development contracts payable are expected to be settled within 12 months.

Note 2.3B: Other payables

2020

2019

$

$

Salaries and wages

122,946

53,543

Prepayments received/unearned income

315,027

787,008

Other

1,592

1,163

Total other payables

439,565

841,714

All other payables are expected to be settled within 12 months

Note 2.3C: Leases

2020

2019

$

$

Lease Liabilities

609,146

-

Total leases

609,146

-

Total leases are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

599,421

-

More than 12 months

9,725

-

Total leases

609,146

-

The Entity has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Note 2.4: Provisions (Accounting Policy – Provisions)

Makegood
Wine Australia currently has three agreements for the leasing of premises which have provisions requiring Wine Australia to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the leases. Wine Australia has made a provision to reflect the present value of this obligation.

Note 2.4A: Other provisions

$

$

Provision for restoration

Total

As at 1 July 2019

110,000

110,000

Amounts used

(6,875)

(6,875)

Total as at 30 June 2020

103,125

103,125

All other provisions are expected to be settled within 12 months.

Funding

Note 3.1: Regulatory charging summary

This section identifies Wine Australia’s funding structure.

Note 3.1: Regulatory charging summary

2020

2019

$

$

Expenses

Direct costs

2,375,962

2,428,892

Indirect costs

1,695,070

1,759,047

Total expenses

4,071,032

4,187,939

External revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services

4,777,116

5,300,608

Total external revenue

4,777,116

5,300,608

Regulatory charging activities
Under s. 8(f) and (g) of the Wine Australia Act 2013 (‘the Act’), Wine Australia can charge to provide services, such as its export control and certification activities.
Regulation 6(1)(a) requires exporters to be licenced, 6(1)(d) requires wines to be assessed as sound and merchantable and 6(1)(f) requires export permits to be issued by Wine Australia before wine can be exported. Furthermore s. 8(c) of the Act provides Wine Australia the power to issue certificates required to demonstrate that wine meets the requirements of the market to which Australian wine is exported.
The fees are designed to cover the costs incurred in conducting Wine Australia’s export control activities and includes provision for enhancements and upgrades of the new electronic approval system, which was replaced during the 2019–20 year.

People and relationships

Note 4.1: Employee provisions (Accounting Policy – Employee provisions)

This section describes a range of employment and post-employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.Liabilities for short-term employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.
Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.
Leave
The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave.
The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the entity’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.
The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the work of an actuary as at 30 June 2020. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.
Separation and redundancy
Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. Wine Australia recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.
Superannuation
Other than a small number of staff who are members of the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the entity’s Australian based staff are members of defined contribution superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government.
The PSS is a defined benefit scheme for the Australian Government. The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The entity makes employer contributions to the employees’ defined benefit superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The entity accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.
The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

Note 4.1: Employee provisions

2020

2019

$

$

Long service leave

764,508

624,565

Annual leave

667,658

576,353

Separations and redundancies

87,487

53,062

Total employee provisions

1,519,653

1,253,980

Employee provisions are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

1,147,069

1,015,602

More than 12 months

372,584

238,378

Total employee provisions

1,519,653

1,253,980

Note 4.2 Key management and personnel remuneration

Senior executive remuneration expenses

Key management personnel (KMP) are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of Wine Australia.

For the purpose of this note, Wine Australia has defined KMPs, as Directors, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and selected employees who report directly to the CEO. These employees are considered to have the capacity and responsibility for decision-making that can have a significant and direct impact on the strategic direction and financial performance of Wine Australia.

Wine Australia reviewed the updated guidance of RMG-138: Commonwealth entities Executive Remuneration Reporting Guide for Annual Reports and the total number of KMP positions included in this table is 12 (17 in 2018-19).

Name

Position

Term as KMP

Clark, Andreas

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

Full year

Barclay, Stuart

General Manager (GM)

Full year

Weinert, Steven

General Manager (GM)

Full year

Waters, Elizabeth

General Manager (GM)

Full year

Cooper, Catherine

Board member

Full year

Croser, Brian

Board member

Full year

Hoj, Peter

Board member

Full year

Oates, Catherine

Board member

Full year

Retallack, Mary

Board member

Full year

Taylor, Mitchell

Board member

Full year

Walsh, Brian

Board member

Part-year - until 30 September 2019

Allan, Michele

Board member

Part-year - until 20 October 2019

Note 4.2 Key management personnel remuneration

2020

2019

$

$

Short-term employee benefits:

Salary and annual leave accrued

1,365,233

1,401,312

Other benefits and allowances

94,610

99,719

Total short-term employee benefits

1,459,843

1,501,031

Post-employment benefits

Superannuation

165,912

173,448

Total post-employment benefits

165,912

173,448

Other long-term employee benefits

Long service leave accrued

30,270

27,995

Total other long-term employee benefits

30,270

27,995

Total senior executive remuneration expenses

1,656,025

1,702,474

Note 4.3 Related party relationships

Related party relationships

Wine Australia is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the entity are Directors and Key Management Personnel, and other Australian Government Entities.

Transactions with related parties

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of research grants.

The following transactions with related parties occurred during the financial year:

  • A Grant to the value of $63,298 was made to Taylors Enterprises, which Wine Australia Director, Mitchell Taylor, is Managing Director of Taylors Wines. The grant was approved under Tourism and Cellar Door grant scheme and was made on normal terms and conditions.
  • Wine Australia Director, Dr. Michele Allan is a Director at CSIRO and Charles Sturt university which both have multi-year research agreements with Wine Australia. The research partners received $3,777,375 and $588,558 respectively in funding throughout 2019-20. The agreements were approved under standard procurement protocols and commenced prior to Dr Allan’s appointment.

There were no balances outstanding at year end.

Note 4.4: Remuneration of auditors

2020

2019

$

$

Remuneration of auditors

Audit of the financial statements

42,000

41,000

Total remuneration of auditors

42,000

41,000

Auditor fees

The fair value of services provided by the Auditor-General in auditing the financial statements for the reporting period.

Managing uncertainties

Note 5.1: Contingent Assets and Liabilities (Accounting Policy – Contingent Assets and Liabilities)

This section analyses how Wine Australia manages financial risks within its operating environment.

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

At 30 June 2020, the entity had no contingent assets or liabilities, this being consistent with 30 June 2019.

Financial assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, Wine Australia classifies its financial assets at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the entity’s business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

  1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and
  2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses ifrisk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the writeoff directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Financial liabilities

Wine Australia classifies its Financial liabilities as other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Financial liabilities are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Note 5.2A: Categories of financial instruments

2020

2019

$

$

Financial assets at amortised cost:

Deposits at bank

10,028,060

10,016,320

Total financial assets at amortised cost

10,028,060

10,016,320

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss:

Cash and cash equivalents

4,993,566

3,144,006

Interest receivable

121

6,039

Industry contributions receivables

1,053,989

981,662

Other receivables

601,405

1,258,800

Total financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

6,649,081

5,390,508

Total financial assets

16,677,141

15,406,828

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost:

Suppliers

528,925

892,263

Research and development contracts

645,756

307,007

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

1,174,681

1,199,270

Total financial liabilities

1,174,681

1,199,270

Wine Australia has no reclassifications or remeasurements of financial assets to disclose.

Note 5.2B: Net gains or losses on financial assets

2020

2019

$

$

Held-to-maturity investments:

Interest revenue

153,644

424,366

Net gain on held-to-maturity investments

153,644

424,366

Receivables:

Interest revenue

40,206

86,994

Exchange losses

(79,127)

(136,964)

Net gain on receivables

(38,921)

(49,970)

Net gain on financial assets

114,723

374,396

Other information

Note 6.1 Aggregate assets and liabilities

Note 6.1: Aggregate assets and liabilities

2020

2019

Assets expected to be recovered in:

$

$

No more than 12 months

19,401,303

20,713,979

More than 12 months

5,420,662

4,043,538

Total assets

24,821,965

24,757,517

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

3,463,862

3,166,586

More than 12 months

382,309

238,378

Total liabilities

3,846,170

3,404,964

Note 6.2: Budget Variances Commentary

Note 6.2: Departmental major budget variances for 2019–20

Variances are considered to be ‘major’ based on the following criteria:

  • the variance between budget and actual is greater than 10 per cent or equal to or greater than $150,000, and
  • the variance between budget and actual is greater than 2 per cent of the relevant category (Income, Expenses and Equity totals), or
  • an item below this threshold but is considered important for the reader’s understanding.

Note 6.2: Departmental major budget variances for 2019-20

Explanations of major variances

Affected line items (and statement)

Sale of goods and services/Trade and other receivables

Many marketing events were cancelled or postponed due to COVID-19 during 2019-20, which impacted own-source revenue for user-pay activities. There was also a decline in export licences due to a combination of the system change over with new processes, as well as a decline in renewals and new exporters entering the market due to COVID-19.

  • Statement of Comprehensive Income - Revenue
  • Statement of Financial Position - Asset

Supplier expenditure/Suppliers payable

Supplier expenses were also impacted mainly by the cancellation or postponement of marketing activities due to COVID-19. The PBS Supplier expenses also include lease payments, which are now assets and liabilities under the new AASB 16 accounting standard.

  • Statement of Comprehensive Income - Expenses
  • Statement of Financial Position - Liabilities
  • Cash Flow Statement

Depreciation/Amortisation/Intangibles

Depreciation and Amortisation is higher due to the new accounting treatment of leases (AASB 16). The PBS budget included leases under suppliers. However the Intangibles actuals are less than budget due to a calculation error in the PBS. The opening balance of intangibles included a portion of the new WALAS system, but due to the project rolling into the 2019-20 financial year, a further total project cost was added to the capital items in the PBS, therefore overstating the project budget.

  • Statement of Comprehensive Income - Expenses
  • Statement of Financial Position - Asset
  • Cash Flow Statement

Buildings & leasehold improvements/Lease Liabilities

At the time of PBS preparation and publication, it was unknown what the impact of AASB 16 would be. Leases were shown under suppliers in the PBS numbers.

  • Statement of Financial Position - Asset & Liabilities
  • Cash Flow Statement

Plant and equipment

The plant and equipment PBS budget included a refresh of staff computers and laptops, however this has been delayed until 2020-21.

  • Statement of Financial Position - Asset
  • Cash Flow Statement

Prepayments

Prepayments on the Statement of Financial Position in 2019-20 include prepaid expenses for marketing events that have now been postponed until 2020-21. It also includes a significant cost for the International Masters of Wine Symposium to be held in Adelaide in 2022.

  • Statement of Financial Position - Asset

Research and development contracts - payables

As at 30 June, there was expenditure accrued for project milestone payments where an invoice had not been received yet. These are timing issues, and are expected to be settled in 2020-21.

  • Statement of Financial Position - Liability
  • Cash Flow Statement

Other payables

Other payables in the actuals includes revenue which has been deferred until 2020-21. User-pay activities that were postponed due to COVID-19 were not refunded but instead carried over onto the balance sheet.

  • Statement of Financial Position - Liability
  • Cash Flow Statement

Employee provisions

The employee provision is higher than budget mainly due to two factors. Employees defered taking annual leave during the later part of 2019-20 due to travel restrictions in place because of COVID-19. There are also several employees who are now entitled to Long service leave which has not been taken as yet.

  • Statement of Financial Position - Liability
  • Cash Flow Statement