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Internal governance

Accountable Authority

The Director-General, Chris Moraitis PSM, was the Accountable Authority from 4 January to 30 June 2021.

Executive Board

We have established our Executive Board, which meets regularly (it met six times within the reporting period). Our Executive Board advises the Director-General on the strategic direction and administration of the agency, to support him as the Accountable Authority under the PGPA Act.

The Executive Board’s key functions are to:

  • set the strategic direction of the OSI and ensure it fulfils its mandate
  • on an annual basis, or more regularly if required, review and articulate the OSI’s priorities, and the budget, operational and workforce strategies necessary to achieve these
  • oversee the effective and efficient functioning of the OSI and management of agency resources, including approving the agency’s budget and its financial performance
  • ensure the agency complies with relevant legislative requirements
  • monitor the implementation and performance of the agency’s governance arrangements, and
  • position the agency to meet emerging challenges.

Audit and Risk Management Committee

The Director-General established the Audit and Risk Management Committee to establish and maintain an independent audit function in accordance with his responsibilities under section 45 of the PGPA Act. The Committee held its first meeting in May 2021. Its authority is established under a charter, which sets out its functions and responsibilities. The OSI’s Audit Committee Charter is available at The Director-General established the Audit and Risk Management Committee to establish and maintain an independent audit function in accordance with his responsibilities under section 45 of the PGPA Act. The Committee held its first meeting in May 2021. Its authority is established under a charter, which sets out its functions and responsibilities. The OSI’s Audit Committee Charter is available at https://www.osi.gov.au/about-us-subsite/Documents/osi-armc-charter.pdf.

Members

At 30 June 2020, the Audit and Risk Management Committee consisted of an independent chair and three other independent members.

As prescribed under subsection 17AG (2A) of the PGPA Rule, information on each audit committee member’s qualifications, attendance at meetings and remuneration is set out below:

Kerri Hartland (Chair)

Ms Hartland is a Principal Adviser at Proximity. Prior to this Ms Hartland had 30 years of experience in the Australian Public Service, culminating with her appointment as the Secretary of the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations. Much of her career has been in positions assisting vulnerable people, including 5 years as the Deputy Secretary in the Department of Human Services. Ms Hartland has worked at senior levels across ten agencies, and for five years was the Deputy Director-General at the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation. She was a member of the Advisory Board of the Brotherhood of St Laurence and of Multiple Sclerosis Angels and sits on the board of the Canberra Girls Grammar School. She has degrees in Arts and Economics and a Masters in Legal Studies.

Ms Hartland attended the May 2021 meeting of the Committee. Remuneration paid to Ms Hartland was $4,805 (total price GST inclusive) based on per–meeting participation.

Ms Maria Storti FCA, FAICD (Member)

Ms Storti is a former Ernst & Young partner and has a strong background in audit, systems of control, risk management and performance improvement. She has held senior executive roles across the public, private and not–for–profit sectors. Ms Storti is

a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and a member of the Australian Institute of Internal Auditors. Ms Storti maintains her financial knowledge via continuing professional education requirements.

Ms Storti attended the May 2021 meeting of the Committee. Remuneration paid to Ms Storti was $3,750 (total price GST inclusive) based on per–meeting participation.

Andrew Todd PSM (Member)

Mr Todd has had an extensive career in public service, including leading the development and implementation of Australian Government responses to consular matters and offshore crises. Until recently Mr Todd held the position of First Assistant Secretary, Consular and Crisis Division with DFAT. During this time, he managed the coordination of DFAT’s consular activity through the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Mr Todd’s stakeholder engagement, planning and overall inclusive approach was recognised by his Public Service Medal awarded in 2021. During his career, he has also been responsible for a cross-section of activities including crisis management, international policy, diplomacy, human resources, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, parliamentary and media, public diplomacy, trade advocacy and US Congressional liaison. Mr Todd holds a Bachelor of Arts with Honours from the Australian National University.

Mr Todd attended the May 2021 meeting of the Committee. Remuneration paid to Mr Todd was

$3,750 (total price GST inclusive) based on per–meeting participation.

Peter Quiggin PSM, QC, FAICD (Member)

Mr Quiggin is a highly experienced former Commonwealth agency head with very strong skills in leadership, management and corporate governance. He led Australia’s Office of Parliamentary Counsel for 17 years. Mr Quiggin became a Commonwealth Queen’s Counsel in 2020. As a former First Parliamentary Counsel, Mr Quiggin’s understanding of legislation,

legislative schemes and systems for developing legislation is second-to-none. He is a strategic thinker who understands the environment in which Government agencies operate, and an experienced Board member, having been on Government and not-for-profit Boards

for over a decade and President of an international association for a record three terms. Mr Quiggin is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and has degrees in Law, Accounting, Mathematics and Computer Science.

Mr Quiggin attended the May 2021 meeting of the Committee. Remuneration paid to Mr Quiggin was $3,750 (total price GST inclusive) based on per–meeting participation.

Internal audit

Internal audit is a central component of OSI’s governance framework. Audit strengthens accountability and promotes good governance and transparency through independent and objective assurance.

The OSI engaged our internal auditor within the reporting period, and established our 2021–22 Internal Audit Program, which is specifically directed to address our strategic priorities and risks. It reinforces the appropriate use of resources, cost effectiveness, self–assessment and continuous improvement.

Risk management

We have established our risk management framework, which aligns with the Commonwealth’s Risk Management Policy. Our framework sets out our risk appetite, as well as our risk culture as a set of shared attitudes, values and behaviours that characterise how the OSI considers risk in its day-to-day activities. The OSI and our Chief Risk Officer support a positive risk management culture enabling threats and opportunities to be openly and proactively identified, assessed, communicated and managed at every level.

The OSI identifies and manages strategic and enterprise risks and collaboratively works with its key partners on shared risks, through:

  • formal cross agency committees with key partners
  • senior executive participation in formal whole-of-government meetings
  • formal and informal environmental scanning and collaboration with other domestic and international stakeholders
  • the establishment of committees and working groups, and
  • consideration of shared risk in corporate planning, project/program design and operational activities.

Our Executive Board and Audit and Risk Management Committee review our risks regularly, including the strategic, enterprise and shared risks, and develop strategies and processes to mitigate these risks.

The COVID–19 pandemic has been a significant factor in the risk environment managed by the OSI, with heightened and new risks escalated to senior management and the Executive Board for consideration and response.

Fraud control and integrity

We rely heavily on the fraud control and integrity frameworks of our key partners – the AFP and the Department of Home Affairs. These frameworks are mature and well established and have controls in place to prevent, detect and deal with any fraud. These frameworks also have established management structures to allow for the reporting of suspected fraud or misconduct. For example, the OSI leverages the financial frameworks of the Department of Home Affairs and their built-in controls and reporting frameworks, ensuring that any activities of concern are correctly identified and reported through their management structures to the OSI for action.