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Outcome 6 - Ageing and Aged Care

Ageing and Aged Care

Improved wellbeing for older Australians through targeted support, access to quality care and related information services

Highlights

 Dementia and Aged Care Services (DACS) Fund. The Department provided $106,128,000 of funding through the DACS Fund to support a number of important activities. Program 6.3.
 125,119 home care packages were available as at 30 June 2019. 239,848 older Australians were provided with a home support assessment for aged care services. 64% of people in permanent residential aged care on 30 June 2018 were rated with high care need for cognition and behaviour. 213,397 residential aged care places available as at 30 June 2019.

Programs contributing to Outcome 6

Summary of results against

performance criteria

Program

Targets met

Targets substantially met

Targets not met

Data not available

Program 6.1: Access and Information

-

2

-

-

Program 6.2: Aged Care Services

5

1

-

1

Program 6.3: Aged Care Quality

4

-

-

-

Total

9

3

-

1

Program 6.1: Access and Information

The Department substantially met all performance targets related to this program.

The Government continued to support older Australians, their families, representatives and carers to access reliable and trusted information about aged care services through the My Aged Care contact centre and website. In 2018-19, the Department released a new My Aged Care website, with improved aged care service finder functionality. In addition to the new website, the dashboard in the My Aged Care consumer portal, accessible via MyGov, was enhanced to improve usability and quality of information. To further strengthen services and ensure they are client focused and meeting the needs of vulnerable people, annual refresher training for My Aged Care contact centre staff was introduced.

These enhancements have led to improved client outcomes, responsive assessments of clients’ needs and goals, appropriate referrals and equitable access to aged care services. Additionally, to improve client outcomes for older Australians, the Life Checks website was launched. The website aims to assist the community to make positive changes for staying healthy as they age, with a target audience including 65 years and over.

Supporting equitable and timely access to aged care services and information for older Australians, their families, representatives and carers

Efficiency of My Aged Care is demonstrated through:

a. The percentage of high priority comprehensive assessments with clinical intervention completed within two days of referral acceptance being maintained.

b. The percentage of high priority home support assessments completed within ten calendar days of referral acceptance being maintained.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.136 and Health Corporate Plan 2018-19, p.17

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

a. >90%

b. >90%

89.6%

94.7%

88.0%

93.0%

71.0%

N/A

96.9%

N/A

94.8%

N/A

Result: Substantially met

The Department substantially met the target for the percentage of high priority comprehensive assessments with clinical intervention completed within target timeframes. Factors such as unanticipated spikes in assessment volumes, client complexity and availability of clients contributed to not fully meeting the target. However, the Department exceeded the target of the percentage of high priority home support assessments completed within 10 calendar days of referral acceptance.

The Department is working cooperatively with Aged Care Assessment Teams across jurisdictions to address performance issues in specific regions of service delivery.

Case Study
Launch of the Life Checks website1

On average, Australians are living 25 years longer than they were 100 years ago and that means there is more life to enjoy and plan for. Small changes now can mean a healthier, more secure future in later years. It is never too early, or too late, to plan the life you want.

Life Checks is a free interactive online quiz aimed at people aged 45–64 or 65+, focusing on the key areas of health, finances, work and social life. Based on responses, users are provided with information and links to other government resources that may help them to better plan for their future.

Making positive changes in these areas are important for staying healthy as we get older, having the skills to work as long as we need or want, having the money to live comfortably after we stop working and staying socially connected to avoid isolation and loneliness.

People turning either 45 or 65 are sent reminder letters in the mail encouraging them to complete the quiz on the Life Checks website. In the six months since its launch, the website was visited over 197,000 times, with more than 83,000 Life Checks completed.

Life Checks is a joint initiative of the Australian Government, led by the Department of Health, with support from the Treasury, Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business, Department of Social Services, Department of Education and Training, and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission.

Life Checks customer focus was recognised at the 2019 Good Design Awards, winning the ‘Design Excellence Award’ for innovation in assisting Australians to plan for their future.

Feedback for the Life Checks quiz has been positive, with over 1,000 people lodging complimentary feedback through the website since its launch.

“Very useful resource. A good place to start thinking about health and finances.”

“Loved the quiz. It made me really focus on each of the aspects involved, so it did me a huge favour.”

“I was very touched by the whole 45 year life check as I had wondered where I go from here. Now I have some real guidelines to consider. Thank you.”2

This image depicts the Life Checks website logo.

Percentage of surveyed users3 who are satisfied4 with the service provided by the:

a. My Aged Care Contact Centre is increased.

b. My Aged Care website is increased.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.136

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

a.≥95%

b.≥65%

89%

55%

92%

56%

95%

54%

97%

59%

N/A

N/A

Result: Substantially met

The Department is committed to ensuring older Australians, their families and carers receive the information, support and assistance they need to access aged care services.

My Aged Care Contact Centre user satisfaction did not meet the target in 2018-19. The target was missed partly due to dissatisfaction with the wait times of Home Care Packages and partly due to some instances of unsatisfactory customer service. To increase customer satisfaction and ensure aged care clients are at the centre of every interaction, the Department is continuing to train contact centre staff, and developing information and support services to users of the system so information is clear and readily available. In 2018-19, the Department introduced new annual refresher training for staff in the My Aged Care contact centre. The new refresher training is client centred and covers a variety of scenarios, including how best to help vulnerable people access My Aged Care.

The My Aged Care website satisfaction rate continues to be lower than the target, with users finding the site difficult to navigate. A new website was released in June 2019 which tested well with consumers and stakeholders. The Department is also working with providers to improve the quality of information entered into the site. Satisfaction rates are expected to increase as a result.

Program 6.2: Aged Care Services

There was one performance target for which data sets were not available at the time of publication. Where data sets were available, the Department met or substantially met the targets.

During 2018-19, the Government continued to provide choice to older Australians who need assistance. A range of flexible options are in place to support people who wish to remain in their homes and connected to their community for longer, and residential care for those who are unable to continue living in their own home. Home based care options include the Commonwealth Home Support Programme (CHSP). The CHSP provides support services such as transport, meals, domestic assistance, personal care, nursing, allied health and respite services to support older Australians. This allows them to maintain their independence and keep them living in their homes for as long as possible. In 2018-19, the CHSP provided services in all states and territories, with a focus on wellness and reablement approaches. Additionally, the Home Care Packages program provided individually tailored support for older Australians to remain living independently in their own homes for as long as possible, with 25,187 more packages made available in 2018-19, compared to 2017-18.

Residential aged care provides a range of care options for older Australians who are unable to continue living independently in their own home. This can be on a permanent or short term basis. The number of operational residential mainstream aged care places increased from 207,142 to 213,397 places in 2018-19.

Other flexible care options include:

  • the Short-Term Restorative Care Programme (STRC) and the Transition Care Program (TCP), which supports older Australians who wish to remain living in their own home by improving wellbeing and independence, and increasing physical functioning;
  • the Multi-Purpose Services Program, which enables local people in regional and remote communities access to services that could not be viably delivered through stand-alone hospitals or aged care homes; and
  • the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program, which funds organisations to provide flexible, culturally safe aged care services to older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians close to home and/or their community.

Providing older people home support and/or access to a range of services in their own homes

Commonwealth Home Support Programme continues to provide older people with ongoing support to stay independent and live in their homes and communities for longer.5

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.138 and Health Corporate Plan 2018-19, p.17

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

CHSP provides services to clients nationally from 1 July 2018.

CHSP has a greater focus on activities that support independence and wellness.

Services were provided through the CHSP across all states and territories, with a focus on wellness and reablement.

Result: Met

The CHSP became a national program on 1 July 2018, following the transition of the Western Australian Commonwealth Home and Community Care program services to the CHSP.

In 2018-19, 1,547 CHSP providers delivered a range of entry-level support services to 847,534 older Australians to continue living in their own homes and communities for longer.

In late 2018, the Department conducted a Wellness and Reablement Report6 via a survey to service providers. The Department received 1,025 responses from CHSP providers, with the majority of service providers reporting benefits for clients from wellness and reablement approaches. The report showed that 80 per cent of service providers reported they understood and implemented wellness and reablement approaches in CHSP service delivery, and 74 per cent of service providers’ policy and procedures promote wellness and reablement approaches to service delivery. A wellness and reablement approach may include discussing strategies a client can employ in order to more easily manage day-to-day tasks, for example, transport planning to meet goals around the use of public transport to maintain usual activities. As well as exploring a client’s opportunity for reablement, such as, can the client benefit from time-limited support to regain their functional capability.

Benefits that were identified included promoting autonomy and independence and maintaining and/or building on clients’ strengths and physical capabilities.

Support is provided to older people with complex care needs to keep them living independently in their own homes through the Home Care Packages Program.

a.Number of allocated Home Care Packages.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.138 and Health Corporate Plan 2018-19, p.17

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

a.111,5007

125,119

99,932

91,980

N/A

N/A

Result: Met

The Government recognises that many people want to remain living independently in their own homes for as long as possible. To support this, the Government provides home care packages to help older Australians receive care and remain connected to their communities.

Older Australians are assigned Home Care Packages through My Aged Care, using the national prioritisation system. Home Care Packages are provided at a rate proportionate to the yearly target of packages available. A total of 25,187 more packages have been made available as at 30 June 2019 than 30 June 2018 (99,932). The increase in packages means more support and access for older Australians to a range of services, assisting them with clinical care, visiting the doctor, social activities, personal care and a number of other services to allow them to live independently and comfortably in their own homes for longer.

The Commonwealth Continuity of Support (CoS) Programme8 continues to be implemented in a phased approach to support eligible older people with a disability.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.139

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

Full implementation of all services for New South Wales, South Australia and the Australian Capital Territory.

All services were fully implemented in New South Wales, South Australia and the Australian Capital Territory.

Result: Met

All clients transitioned to the CoS Programme will receive continuity of support for their disability support services. This means clients will achieve similar outcomes to those they were achieving under the former state and territory specialist disability services program.

In addition to the target being met, the Department achieved full implementation by 30 June 2019 in Queensland, Northern Territory, Victoria and Tasmania.

Supporting people in residential aged care

Residential care options and accommodation for older people who are unable to continue living independently in their own homes is increased.

a.Residential aged care places available as at 30 June.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.139

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result9

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

a. 210,100

213,397

210,815

204,335

199,449

195,953

Result: Met

In 2018-19, 213,397 operational places were available in the market, noting that at any point in time not all places are always occupied. To ensure community demand for places can be met and older Australians receive residential care when they need it, residential care places are made available at the level of care required. The Department continues to monitor the impact of the measures introduced in early 2016 that encourage providers to operationalise their provisionally allocated places.

Supporting people with different care needs through flexible care arrangements

The number of older people who accessed restorative interventions through the Short-Term Restorative Care (STRC) Programme or the Transition Care Program is increased.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.139

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

≥28,000

Data not available10

26,024

N/A

N/A

N/A

Demand for Transition Care Program (TCP) places continued to be steady, at around 88.7 per cent of available bed days. STRC demand continued to build in its second full year of operation, noting that the lower than expected utilisation reflects the timing of the allocation of an additional 350 places in late January 2019 and the time taken for providers to bring these new places online.

Both the STRC and TCP support older Australians who wish to remain living in their own home by improving wellbeing and independence, as well as increasing physical functioning.

In the longer term, these restorative care programs will reduce pressures on other aged care services, such as residential aged care and home care.

The number of places funded through the Multi-Purpose Services (MPS) is increased.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.139

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

3,869

3,646

3,624

3,636

3,592

3,545

Result: Substantially met

In 2018-19, the target for the number of places funded through the MPS was substantially met. The number of places is less than the target, as demand for new places to expand existing services or establish new services in the allocations round was less than expected. The Department continues to work with states and territories, which are responsible for MPS infrastructure, to identify suitable new locations to establish MPS services to meet expected demand.

In 2018-19, the MPS Program allocations round resulted in the establishment of a new MPS in Moura, Queensland and expansion of the Barcoo Living MPS in Blackall, Queensland.

The number of places funded through the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program is maintained.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.139

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

1,000

1,07211

860

820

820

802

Result: Met

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program Home Care expansion resulted in an additional 512 home care places being allocated to new and existing service providers. The expansion will be rolled out progressively over four years in remote and very remote locations. The new places and services will allow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to stay at home longer, close to family and country, while improving access to culturally safe aged care services in remote Indigenous communities.

Program 6.3: Aged Care Quality

The Department met all performance targets related to this program.

During 2018-19, the Government continued to support the provision of quality aged care for older Australians. The Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission (ACQSC) was established on 1 January 2019. The ACQSC integrates and streamlines the roles of the Aged Care Complaints Commissioner and the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency. The ACQSC will strengthen quality assessors’ access to clinical advice and enable flexible and responsive regulatory powers. The Department also supported the Government to work with the aged care sector and consumers to develop the Single Aged Care Quality Framework, which will focus on quality outcomes for care recipients when fully implemented in 2019. Elements of the Single Aged Care Quality Framework, including the Aged Care Quality Standards and the Charter of Aged Care Rights, were made into law on 28 September 2018 and 20 March 2019 respectively, to come into effect from 1 July 2019. Also, on 17 June 2019, the National Aged Care Mandatory Quality Indicator Program became mandatory for all residential aged care providers, with effect from 1 July 2019. The Department continued to address aged care provider non-compliance in collaboration with the ACQSC.

A Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety was established in October 2018, with an interim report to be delivered in October 2019 and a final report expected in 2020. The terms of reference for the Commission were informed by extensive consultation by the department with the community and aged care sector. Over 5,000 submissions and representations were received during this process. The Royal Commission has broad scope to inquire into all forms of Commonwealth funded aged care services, regardless of the setting in which those services are delivered. It will look at the aged care sector as a whole, including younger people with disabilities living in residential aged care. The department has established internal systems and processes to ensure responsiveness to requests from the Royal Commission to assist in the conduct of the inquiry.

Ensure the provision of quality aged care, including equitable care for people from diverse backgrounds, and support for people with dementia

The safety, wellbeing, and interests of Commonwealth-subsidised care recipients is protected through regulatory activities.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.141

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

Identify, respond to, and take appropriate action to address approved provider
non-compliance under the Aged Care Act 1997.

The Department undertook appropriate action to address all instances of approved provider non-compliance identified by the ACQSC (and formerly the Aged Care Quality Agency) during 2018-19.

For each incidence of potential non-compliance received by the Department, a risk assessment has been undertaken to determine the appropriate action to address non-compliance.

Result: Met

In return for Government subsidy, providers of aged care services are expected to meet certain responsibilities relating to the provision of care and services. These responsibilities are set out in the Aged Care Act 1997 (the Act).

The Department and the Australian ACQSC both have a role in monitoring provider compliance with their responsibilities. The objective of the Department’s regulatory activities is for providers to voluntarily comply with their responsibilities and where non-compliance is identified, to return the provider to compliance as quickly as possible to protect the health, safety and wellbeing of care recipients.

The Department’s response to identified non-compliance is proportionate to the assessed risk to care and safety of older Australians and includes administrative resolution by engaging with the provider to encourage voluntary compliance. Where this is not appropriate, the Department undertakes formal regulatory resolutions such as issuing a Notice of Non-Compliance under the Act or impose sanctions. In 2018-19, there were 55 Sanctions imposed on 36 approved providers, compared to 26 Sanctions in 2017-18, and 267 Notices of Non-Compliance, compared to 166 in 2017-18.

Existing and emerging challenges are responded to in the provision of aged care for older Australians.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.141

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

Provide funding through the DACS Fund to strengthen the capacity of the aged care sector to better respond to the existing and emerging challenges of aged care reforms.

$106,128,000 of funding was provided through the DACS Fund to support a range of activities.

Result: Met

Funding was provided through the DACS Fund to address emerging priorities in dementia care, services targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and special measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. These services assisted older Australians from diverse backgrounds to receive the same quality of aged care as other older Australians. The DACS Fund also funded the Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grants and the Better Care for people living with Dementia Budget Measures.

Case Study
Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grants

Senior Australians and communities in regional, rural and remote areas across the nation will benefit from $40 million in aged care infrastructure funding announced in the 2018-19 Budget.

The funding provides 117 aged care services in these areas with up to $500,000 each to upgrade old or unsuitable infrastructure. Funding enables extensions and refurbishments to existing buildings, ensuring quality, safety and accessibility of services and associated staff housing.

The grant opportunity was designed to address gaps in funding for regional, rural and remote areas, where geographical constraints and higher costs impede the ability to invest in infrastructure work.

Investing in improved infrastructure ensures the aged care system across the nation can meet the needs of ageing Australians. It also provides better quality accommodation choice for staff within the aged care workforce.

Upgrades will boost the productivity and sustainability of local aged care services and provide an economic stimulus in small regional, rural and remote communities.

“Regional Western Australia, particularly the Kimberley, is an area of great need for quality aged care services and we’re grateful to receive funding that will go a long way to establish staff housing for the Juniper Marlgu service.” – Mr. Chris Hall, Chief Executive, Juniper Marlgu Village Residential Care.

This image depicts a senior male sitting on a couch and talking to a little boy with a soft toy in his hand.

The quality of care for people with dementia by the provision of vocational-level training to aged care workers or continuing professional development training to health professionals is improved.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.142

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

At least 70% of people surveyed12 think that the quality of care they are receiving has improved since their associated aged care worker/health professional has undertaken training through the national Dementia Training Program.

Negotiate funding agreements for service delivery for 2019-20.

94% of care givers surveyed report an improvement in confidence when managing Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) following an intervention from the DBMAS.

Result: Met

The Dementia Training Program provides accredited education, up-skilling and professional development for the workforce providing dementia care in the primary, acute and aged care sectors. In 2018-19, people providing care, family members and people living with dementia have verified that the knowledge and skills imparted through training have translated into a higher quality of care.

The Dementia Training Program is available nationally, including in rural and remote areas, and is delivered through face to face training, online learning and a comprehensive range of free online resources and webinars. The availability of affordable and high quality training in dementia care is helping improve the quality of care for people living with dementia across Australia.

The confidence of aged care providers in managing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia is increased.

Source: 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p.142

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

At least 75% of sampled care givers13 report an improvement in confidence when managing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, following an intervention from the Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Services (DBMAS).

94% of care givers surveyed report an improvement in confidence when managing Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) following an intervention from the DBMAS.

Result: Met

DBMAS provides nationally coordinated, locally based support and advice to aged, primary and acute care providers and individuals caring for people living with dementia where BPSD are impacting on their care and quality of life. These services are delivered face to face in rural and remote areas as well as urban areas across Australia. During 2018-19, care providers who used this service have become more skilled and confident in caring for people living with dementia.

The Department also collects data on the impact of DBMAS interventions for a person’s BPSD. A Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) for the referred client is undertaken on entry and discharge from the service. Results of the NPI measures show a significant decrease in the number, frequency and severity of BPSD as well as carer distress.

As well as improving confidence and skill for care providers where BPSD are affecting a person’s care, a national database has been developed that can inform research on the triggers of BPSD and the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions. This data informs the aged, acute and primary care sectors about knowledge gaps in these sectors.

Outcome 6 - Expenses and Resources

Budget Estimate 2018-19

$’000 (A)

Actual 2018-19

$’000 (B)

Variation

$’000

(B) - (A)

Program 6.1: Access and Information

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)

233,536

229,700

(3,836)

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation1

107,538

111,806

4,268

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year2

1,973

2,615

642

Total for Program 6.1

343,047

344,121

1,074

Program 6.2: Aged Care Services3

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)4

3,341,647

3,237,091

(104,556)

Zero Real Interest Loans

- appropriation

27,960

6,638

(21,322)

- expense adjustment5

(18,656)

(3,417)

15,239

Special appropriations

Aged Care Act 1997

- flexible care

492,925

471,872

(21,053)

Aged Care Act 1997

- residential and home care

14,927,939

14,563,877

(364,062)

National Health Act 1953

- continence aids payments

91,936

90,062

(1,874)

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation1

53,050

51,283

(1,767)

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year2

1,882

2,473

591

Total for Program 6.2

18,918,683

18,419,879

(498,804)

Program 6.3: Aged Care Quality

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)

167,570

146,928

(20,642)

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation1

41,217

37,475

(3,742)

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year2

1,301

1,567

266

Total for Program 6.3

210,088

185,970

(24,118)

Outcome 6 totals by appropriation type

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)

3,770,713

3,620,357

(150,356)

- expense adjustment5

(18,656)

(3,417)

15,239

Special appropriations

15,512,800

15,125,811

(386,989)

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation1

201,805

200,564

(1,241)

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year2

5,156

6,655

1,499

Total expenses for Outcome 6

19,471,818

18,949,970

(521,848)

Average staffing level (number)

789

791

2

1 Departmental appropriation combines ‘Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)’ and ‘Revenue from independent sources (s74)’.

2 Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year are made up of depreciation expense, amortisation, make good expense, operating losses and audit fees.

3 This Program excludes Home and Community Care National Partnership payments to state and territory governments by the Treasury as part of the Federal Financial Relations (FFR) Framework.

4 ‘Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)’ against program 6.2 excludes amounts appropriated in Bill 1 for Zero Real Interest Loans as this funding is not accounted for as an expense.

5 Payments under the zero real interest loans program are a loan to aged care providers and not accounted for as an expense. The concessional loan discount is the expense and represents the difference between an estimate of the market rate of interest, and that recovered under the loan agreement, over the life of the loan. This adjustment recognises the difference between the appropriation and the concessional loan discount expense.

Footnotes

  1. Available at: www.lifechecks.gov.au
  2. De-identified user feedback.
  3. ‘Users’ refers broadly to different types of callers to the My Aged Care Contact Centre and visitors to the My Aged Care website, including people seeking information and/or services for themselves, or others, as well as aged care service providers seeking information or system help.
  4. ‘Satisfied’ callers to the My Aged Care Contact Centre and visitors to the My Aged Care website are those who respond ‘very satisfied’ or ‘satisfied’ to the My Aged Care Customer Satisfaction Survey question: ‘How satisfied were you overall with your experience?’
  5. This is measured through the program evaluation and by accessing data from My Aged Care.
  6. Available at: www.agedcare.health.gov.au/programs/reporting-for-chsp/outcomes-of-the-2...
  7. This target has increased to 124,032 since publication of the 2018-19 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, due to two measures announced through the 2018-19 Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook and the 2019-20 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, which took effect in the 2018-19 year.
  8. The CoS Programme provides support to older people with a disability who were receiving state and territory-managed specialist disability services but were ineligible for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) at the time the NDIS is implemented in a region. The CoS Programme is being implemented in line with the NDIS rollout.
  9. Previous targets reported all residential places including mainstream and flexible care. The 2018-19 Annual Report only reports residential mainstream places in line with the 2018-19 published target. This represents an increase from the 2017-18 result for mainstream residential places of 6,255 (2017-18 residential mainstream only places result was 207,142).
  10. Data relating to the number of clients accessing STRC and TCP was unavailable at the time of publishing, as the data was not yet finalised. When finalised, STRC and TCP data will be published on the GEN Aged Care website, available at: www.gen-agedcaredata.gov.au
  11. The majority of these places became operational in 2018-19, with the remainder to become operational in 2019-20 and 2020-21.
  12. People surveyed include providers of care for, and the families of, people living with dementia.
  13. Sampled care givers include family carers, acute care staff and aged care staff/providers.