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Workforce planning

This section provides information on average workforce strength during 2019–20. Like other Commonwealth agencies, Defence uses average workforce strength figures for planning and budgeting purposes.

In 2019–20 implementation of the Defence Strategic Workforce Plan 2016–2026 saw improved outcomes in recruiting, retention, career management and transition support, as well as progress in managing and professionalising the APS workforce through the use of Job Families. ADF recruiting achieved 93 per cent of targets for enlistments into the permanent ADF (ab initio and prior service). Women represented 23.4 per cent of enlistments and, combined with retention efforts, this has resulted in 526 more women serving in the ADF (Service Categories 7 and 6, excluding Service Option G) than 12 months ago. Retention in the ADF permanent force improved, with a decline in separations from 9.7 per cent to 9.0 per cent, close to the five-year average of 9.1 per cent. The APS workforce also saw a decline in separations over the year, from 10.4 per cent to 9.4 per cent.

Indigenous representation in the permanent ADF improved, with more than 350 Indigenous personnel recruited in 2019–20. Indigenous representation in the permanent ADF is now at 3.2 per cent. In relation to transition services, Defence provided individualised career coaching and mentoring services to 5,982 ADF personnel transitioning from Defence, with the aim of assisting them to achieve meaningful employment or meaningful engagement. An additional 3,297 Reserve members were provided needs-based transition support following Operation BUSHFIRE ASSIST 2019–2020.

Staffing levels and statistics

All workforce information in this report is at 30 June 2020, and will differ to the rounded workforce achievement figures stated in the Force Structure Plan, which reflects data at an earlier point in time.

Defence budgets for its ADF workforce on an average funded strength basis and for the APS workforce on an average staffing level basis. Defence uses actual full-time equivalent (FTE), which is paid strength on a particular date, to provide the most accurate indicator of current staffing levels. Workforce planning is based on average funded strength for the ADF and average staffing levels for the APS for the financial year; these averages are used to plan for an affordable workforce.

Defence also records some statistical data by headcount. All personnel are counted equally regardless of the number of hours worked. The figures include all personnel recorded as on duty or on leave, full-time or part-time, with or without pay. This statistical basis is used for information by gender, employment categories and employment location. Defence does not base its workforce planning on headcount figures.

Total Workforce System

Over the period 2016 to 2018, Defence transitioned to the Total Workforce Model under Project Suakin. In October 2019, Project Suakin was closed and the model was renamed as the ADF Total Workforce System in recognition that it was operational.

A key feature of the Total Workforce System is the ADF Service Spectrum, encompassing the permanent and Reserve forces. Under the Service Spectrum, the ADF workforce consists of six Service Categories differentiated by their relative obligation, commitment and contribution to capability. Members of the permanent ADF serve in Service Categories 7 and 6. Reservists serve in Service Categories 3, 4 and 5. Members in Service Category 2 are Reservists who do not render service but may be subject to call out.

The Service Categories and options available across the Service Spectrum provide members with the choice and flexibility they need to continue to serve. By accessing the workforce potential available across the Service Spectrum it should be easier for Defence to find the right person at the right time.

A program of work to embed and optimise the Total Workforce System across Defence is being undertaken over the period 2020 to 2023. Key activities include improving transfer between Service Categories, extending transition support services across the Service Spectrum and ensuring that future workforce structures are designed to access the flexibility and agility available across the Service Spectrum.

One of the drivers for introducing the ADF Total Workforce System was members seeking more flexibility in how they can serve and work. The introduction of Service Category 6 in 2018 has enhanced the existing suite of flexible work arrangements available to ADF members by allowing members of the permanent force to work reduced hours on a flexible service arrangement.

Each Service has a target of 2 per cent of the trained workforce accessing formalised flexible work arrangements. As at 30 June 2020, Navy has again exceeded this target for the non-seagoing, trained, permanent and continuous full-time service workforce, with 6.1 per cent; Army has 444 personnel (1.7 per cent) on formal flexible work arrangements and 117 personnel (0.45 per cent) in Service Category 6 in a pattern of service other than full time; and Air Force has 6.5 per cent of its trained workforce on formal, documented flexible work arrangements.

Table 6.2: Total Workforce System—Service Spectrum continuum

Previous description

Service Spectrum continuum

Additional information

Permanent

Full-time service (Service Category 7)

Reservists on continuous full-time service (Service Option C) are included in permanent force funded strength numbers but not in headcount figures.

Other than full-time service (Service Category 6)

Members of the permanent forces rendering a pattern of service other than full-time, who are subject to the same obligations as Service Category 7.

Reserves

Specific pattern of service and number of days served (Service Category 5)

Members of the Reserves who provide a contribution to capability that extends across financial years and who have security of tenure for the duration of their approved commitment to serve. They are liable for a call out. They can undertake continuous full-time service (Service Option C).

Providing service, which includes an availability (Service Category 4)

Members of the Reserves who serve in a contingent capability at short notice, with their notice to move defined by their Service. They are liable for call out and available to be ‘called for’. They can undertake continuous full-time service (Service Option C).

Available for service or providing service (Service Category 3)

Members of the Reserves who provide a contingent contribution to capability by indicating their availability to serve or who are rendering service to meet a specified task within a financial year. They are liable for call out. They can undertake continuous full-time service (Service Option C).

Not providing service but can be called out in specific circumstances if required (Service Category 2)

Members of the Reserve forces who do not render service and have no service obligation. They are liable for call out.

Defence APS employees on deployment

Employees of the Defence APS who are force assigned (Service Category 1)

APS employees of Defence who have been seconded or attached to the ADF and are force assigned on operations.

ADF Gap Year

Full-time service (Service Option G)

The ADF Gap Year is a program that enables 17 to 24 year olds with Year 12 education to experience segments of ADF training and employment for up to 12 months.

Australian Defence Force staffing

ADF staffing figures for 2018–19 and 2019–20 are shown in Table 6.3.

Table 6.3: Australian Defence Force staffing figures, 2018–19 and 2019–20

ADF staffing measure1,2

2018–193

2019–20

Variation

For workforce planning purposes

Actual funded strength (paid strength as at 30 June)

58,554

59,760

1,206

Average funded strength (over the financial year)

58,380

59,109

729

For other statistical data

Permanent headcount (on duty/leave and paid/unpaid)

58,058

59,095

1,037

Notes:

  1. Funded strength figures include the ADF Gap Year (Service Option G). For consistency with other tables in this chapter, the headcount figures do not include the ADF Gap Year, which had 566 participants on 30 June 2019, rising to 595 participants on 30 June 2020.
  2. Funded strength figures do not include the Reserve workforce other than those on continuous full-time service (Service Option C), who are paid through the same mechanism as permanent force members. For consistency with other tables in this chapter the headcount figures do not include Reserve members
  3. 2018–19 headcount figures have been adjusted from those reported in the Defence Annual Report 2018–19 to account for retrospective transactions.

Table 6.4 details ADF permanent force average funded strength for 2019–20, which includes ADF Reserves on continuous full-time service. ADF strength was 59,109 in 2019–20, an increase of 729 from 2018–19. Average funded strength for Reserves on continuous full-time service was 1,055 (comprising Navy 312, Army 651 and Air Force 92)—an increase of 277 from 2018–19

Table 6.4: Australian Defence Force permanent force (Service Categories 7 and 6) and Reserves undertaking continuous full-time service (Service Option C), average funded strength

2018-19 Actual

2019-20 Budget estimate1

2019-20 Revised estimate2

2019-20 Actual

Variation

%

Navy

14,176

14,776

14,776

14,821

45

0.3%

Army

29,982

30,821

30,821

29,923

-898

-2.9%

Air Force

14,222

14,493

14,493

14,365

-128

-0.9%

Total average funded strength

58,380

60,090

60,090

59,109

-981

-1.6%

Notes:

Figures in this table are average strengths; they are not a headcount. Reserves undertaking full-time service are included in the figures. Employees on forms of leave without pay are not included.

  1. As published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2019–20.
  2. As published in the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2019–20.

ADF enlistments and separations

In 2019–20 Defence recruited over 7,500 personnel to a combination of permanent and Reserve roles, an increase of 365 from 2018–19.

ADF enlistments can be categorised as ab initio (those with no prior military service) or prior service enlistments.

While there are specific areas that require further improvement to attain the desired workforce numbers, overall Defence has achieved 93 per cent of its target for the recruitment of full-time ADF members (ab initio and prior service).

In 2019–20 the ADF enlisted 6,277 permanent members, made up of 4,810 men, 1,466 women and one member of indeterminate/intersex/unspecified gender. This was 560 more enlistments than in 2018–19.

Of the 6,277 ADF permanent members enlisted, 1,273 entrants had prior military service in the Reserves (Service Categories 5, 4 and 3), the Gap Year program (Service Option G) or another country, or they had previous permanent force service. There were 5,004 ab initio entrants.

The permanent ADF headcount (Service Categories 7 and 6) increased by 1,037 in 2019–20. This reflects the net difference between enlistments and separations. The Reserve headcount increased by over 1,600, reflecting the implementation of the Total Workforce Summary for how Defence generates personnel capability. This is also reflected in the increased number of days that personnel provided to the Reserve Service.

The Gap Year program (Service Option G) for 2019–20 achieved 99.4 per cent of recruiting targets, which is a slight decrease from 99.7 per cent in 2018–19. The Gap Year program is now established as a key avenue of entry to the ADF, with a high proportion of entrants electing to remain in either the permanent or Reserve workforce.

Tables 6.5 and 6.6 provide comparative information about ADF permanent force (Service Categories 7 and 6) separations over the last two years.

Table 6.5: ADF permanent force (Service Categories 7 and 6) and ongoing APS, 12-month rolling separation rates as at 30Â June 2019 and 30 June 2020

12-month rolling separation rate (%)

30 June 2019

30 June 2020

Navy

8.1%

6.6%

Army

11.6%

11.0%

Air Force

7.3%

7.3%

Total ADF permanent force

9.7%

9.0%

APS

Ongoing APS

10.4%

9.4%

Note:

For improved accuracy, separation rates are calculated using monthly average headcounts, not end of financial year headcount figures.

Table 6.6: ADF permanent force (Service Categories 7 and 6) separations, 2018–19 and 2019–20

Voluntary separations1

Involuntary separations2

Age retirement

Trainee separations

Total

2018-193

Navy

Officers

142

33

8

50

233

Other ranks

558

200

8

128

894

Army

Officers

236

117

31

147

531

Other ranks

1,615

856

23

424

2,918

Air Force

Officers

219

49

18

45

331

Other ranks

419

204

22

65

710

Total ADF permanent force

Officers

597

199

57

242

1,095

Other ranks

2,592

1,260

53

617

4,522

Total

3,189

1,459

110

859

5,617

2019-20

Navy

Officers

100

25

6

36

167

Other ranks

405

251

14

126

796

Army

Officers

217

102

22

98

439

Other ranks

1,538

745

19

484

2,786

Air Force

Officers

190

57

15

30

292

Other ranks

444

225

22

69

760

Total ADF permanent force

Officers

507

184

43

164

898

Other ranks

2,387

1,221

55

679

4,342

Total

2,894

1,405

98

843

5,240

Notes:

Figures in this table show permanent force (Service Categories 7 and 6) substantive headcount numbers. Reserves undertaking continuous full-time service (Service Option C) are not included. Separation groupings are mutually exclusive—an individual is placed in only one group, with age retirement and trainee separations taking precedence over voluntary and involuntary separations. ADF members commencing leave or leave without pay are not included.

  1. ‘Voluntary’ includes voluntary redundancies and resignations.
  2. ‘Involuntary’ primarily comprises members who are medically transitioned from Defence, and personnel who were unsuitable for further duty, died while serving or were part of ‘Command Initiated Transfer to the Reserve’.
  3. Data for 2018–19 does not match the data provided in the Defence Annual Report 2018–19 due to retrospective transactions.

ADF Reserves

The number of days each ADF Reserve member (Service Categories 5, 4 and 3) works in a year can vary substantially depending on personal circumstances and organisational need. To reflect this, Table 6.7 shows both the total number of days served by Reserve members in 2018–19 and the number of Reservists who rendered paid service.

In 2019–20 there was an increase of 109,330 days. service compared to 2018–19, to a total of 1,120,849 (112,514 Navy; 775,012 Army; and 233,323 Air Force), while the number of Reservists undertaking service days increased to 21,189 (1,823 Navy; 15,721 Army; and 3,645 Air Force).

As Table 6.7 shows, the figures for number of days served by Navy, Army and Air Force Reserve members were all greater than forecast (by 17 per cent, 13 per cent and 6 per cent respectively). This was primarily due to the support provided for Operation BUSHFIRE ASSIST 2019–2020 and also for COVID-19 support.

Table 6.7: ADF Reserve paid strength (Service Categories 5, 4 and 3), 2018–19 and 2019–20

2018-19

Actual:

days served

2019-20 Budget estimate3: days served (members paid)

2019-20 Revised estimate4: days served (members paid)

2018-19

Actual:

days served (members paid)

Variation:

days served (members paid)

Percentage variation:

days served (members paid)

Navy

102,574

96,000

96,000

112,514

16,514

17%

(1,722)

(1,750)

(1,750)

(1,823)

(73)

(4%)

Army

691,758

685,000

685,000

775,012

90,012

13%

(15,418)

(15,500)

(15,500)

(15,721)

(221)

(1%)

Air Force

217,187

219,400

219,400

233,323

13,923

6%

(3,411)

(3,200)

(3,200)

(3,645)

(445)

(14%)

Total paid Reserves

1,011,519

1,000,400

1,000,400

1,120,849

120,449

12%

(20,551)

(20,450)

(20,450)

(21,189)5

(739)

(4%)

Notes:

  1. Because the number of days or hours worked by Reserve members can vary greatly, figures in this table show the total number of days’ service rendered, with a headcount of members rendering paid service in brackets.
  2. This table includes Service Categories 5, 4 and 3. Reserves on continuous full-time service (Service Option C) are not included in this table; they are included in Table 6.4.
  3. As published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2019–20.
  4. As published in the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2019–20.
  5. This represents the reserve personnel that rendered service from the around 29, 000 personnel across service categories 5, 4, and 3 that have indicated availability to render service. It does not include around 11,000 personnel in Service Category 2 that are not rendering service and may be called on as required.

Australian Public Service workforce

APS staffing figures for 2018–19 and 2019–20 are shown in Table 6.8.

Table 6.8: APS staffing figures, 2018–19 and 2019–20

APS staffing measure

2018–191

2019–20

Variation

For workforce planning purposes

Actual FTE (paid strength as at 30 June)

15,996

16,505

509

Average FTE (over the financial year)

15,925

16,129

204

For other statistical data

Headcount figure (on duty/leave, full-time or part-time, paid/unpaid)

16,888

17,454

566

Notes:

Figures include both ongoing and non-ongoing APS employees.

  1. 2018–19 headcount figures have been adjusted from those reported in the Defence Annual Report 2018–19 to account for retrospective transactions.

Table 6.9 shows details of the APS average strength, expressed as average FTE, for 2019–20. APS average strength was 16,129 in 2019–20. This was an increase of 204 from the 2018–19 figure of 15,925.

Table 6.9: APS workforce, average full-time equivalent, 2018–19 and 2019–20

2018-19 Actual

2019-20 Budget estimate1

2019-20 Revised estimate2

2019-20 Actual

Variation

%

APS

15,925

16,272

16,271

16,129

-142

-0.9%

Notes:

These figures are average FTE; they are not a headcount.

  1. As published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2019–20.
  2. As published in the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2019–20.

Table 6.10 shows the actual FTE at the last pay in 2019–20, which at 16,505 was 509 greater than the final pay figure in 2018–19 of 15,996.

Table 6.10: APS workforce, end-of-year actual full-time equivalent, 2018–19 and 2019–20

2018-19

Actual

2019-20

Actual

Variation

APS

15,996

16,505

509

Note: Figures in this table are actual FTE for the last payday of 2019–20. Employees on forms of leave without pay are not included. The figures differ from Table 6.9 as that table shows the average FTE across the full year.

Australian Public Service recruitment and separations

Defence recruited 2,297 APS employees during 2019–20, including 251 as part of the graduate program.

The APS headcount increased by 566, which reflects the net difference between recruitment and separations. The majority of separations were due to resignation or retirement from Defence (Table 6.11).

Table 6.11: APS separations, 2018–19 and 2019–20

Voluntary redundancy1

Involuntary separations2

Resignation/

retirement3

Transfers4

Total

2018–195

Senior Executive Service

1

11

10

22

Executive Levels 1 and 2

103

16

335

84

538

Other levels

192

66

869

163

1,290

Total APS

296

82

1,215

257

1,850

2019-20

Senior Executive Service

11

7

18

Executive Levels 1 and 2

46

17

307

92

462

Other levels

125

59

894

173

1,251

Total APS

171

76

1,212

272

1,731

Notes:

Figures in this table show ongoing and non-ongoing headcount numbers (substantive headcount).

  1. Voluntary redundancies are those that are program initiated.
  2. Involuntary figures include breach of conduct, invalidity retirement, involuntary redundancies, lack of qualifications, non-performance, term probation and death.
  3. Resignation/retirement figures include resignation, retirement (minimum age and Senior Executive Service) and completion of non-ongoing.
  4. Transfers are those who have transferred to other government departments.
  5. Some 2018–19 figures have been adjusted from those reported in the Defence Annual Report 2018–19 to account for retrospective transactions.

Army’s partnerships—creating capacity and capability

This is a photo of an Australian Army Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter and a Royal Australian Navy MH-60R helicopter on the HMAS Canberra flight deck in the Philippine Sea during the Regional Presence Deployment 2020.
An Australian Army Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter and a Royal Australian Navy MH-60R helicopter on the HMAS Canberra flight deck in the Philippine Sea during the Regional Presence Deployment 2020.
The challenges that the Australian Defence Force faces are often dynamic and multifaceted, complicated by shifts in technology, geopolitics, demographics and the environment. Army cannot deal with these challenges alone—it relies on a team approach to bring together people with the expertise and experience needed to address the problem at hand.

Army’s approach to teamwork is reflected in its successful partnerships with industry, academia and national institutions. It prepares its people to work effectively in teams through its culture optimisation program Good Soldiering.

Our partnerships with industry are key to delivering land capability. We work closely with industry to support the development of sovereign capability, improve Army’s ability to generate land power effects and help build the workforce of the future. We engage with industry early and often to seek solutions that provide more capacity for Army’s teams. Activities such as the annual Army Innovation Day enable dialogue with industry to ensure Army is making the best use of new technology.

Army supports key delivery agencies to maximise Australian industry involvement in the Capability Life Cycle. These agencies include the Defence Innovation Hub, the Centre for Defence Industry Capability and the Defence Industry Policy Division.

Army has recently established strategic partnerships with two national institutions to achieve shared goals. It has engaged with the Australian Institute of Sport to advance human cognitive, physical and team performance; and with Broken Hill Proprietary Limited (BHP) to develop capability in education, training, technology and workforce. These partnerships allow both organisations to share knowledge, build the leadership and technical skills of their people and contribute to national resilience.

Defence faces difficult challenges but it does not do this alone. Army’s work to build teams through partnerships and shared experience ensures our national resilience in times of crisis.

Actual workforce

This section provides workforce information as at 30 June 2020 and outlines changes in the workforce that occurred during 2019–20. Tables 6.12 to 6.18 show numbers of people, employment categories, locations and gender information. The numbers of Star-ranked and Senior Executive Service officers are provided at Tables 6.14 and 6.15. The information is based on headcount.

At 30 June 2020, Defence had a permanent workforce of 76,197, comprising 59,095 permanent ADF members (Service Categories 7 and 6, excluding Service Option G) and 17,102 ongoing APS employees. In addition, 352 APS employees were employed on a non-ongoing basis (Table 6.17).

The Reserve (Service Categories 5, 4 and 3) headcount increased by 1,661 to 28,878 (including members on continuous full-time service (Service Option C)). A further 11,000 personnel are in Service Category 2; if personnel in Service Category 2 render service they change their status to Service Category 5, 4 or 3. If people are not able to continue rendering service they transfer to Service Category 2 and are available to be called upon as required.

The total ADF workforce was 87,973, comprising 18,659 Navy permanent and Reserve members, 49,259 Army permanent and Reserve members, and 20,055 Air Force permanent and Reserve members.

At 30 June 2020, 1,172 Reserves were also Defence APS employees.

Table 6.12: Defence workforce headcount as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2020

Navy

Army

Air Force

ADF1

APS2

Headcount 30 June 2019

14,206

29,510

14,342

58,058

16,888

Additions

1,784

3,342

1,151

6,277

2,297

Separations

963

3,225

1,052

5,240

1,731

Headcount 30 June 2020

15,027

29,627

14,441

59,095

17,454

Change

821

117

99

1,037

566

Notes:

Figures in this table show substantive headcount numbers.

  1. ADF figures are for permanent members (Service Categories 7 and 6) and do not include Reserves (Service Categories 5, 4 3 and 2), Reserves undertaking continuous full-time service (Service Option C) or ADF Gap Year participants (Service Option G).
  2. APS figures include paid and unpaid employees, which covers full-time, part-time, suspended, ongoing and non-ongoing employees.

This is a photo of Defence Administration Assistance Program members Sharon Lakin, Roslyn Huntriss, Julian Cook and Jessica Jennings team up to roll up emergency shelters used for training at Combat Survival Training School on 25 June 2020.
Defence Administration Assistance Program members Sharon Lakin, Roslyn Huntriss, Julian Cook and Jessica Jennings team up to roll up emergency shelters used for training at Combat Survival Training School on 25 June 2020.

The APS figures in Table 6.13 have historically been reported using substantive location. A review of the location figures in 2019-20 identified that actual location provides a more reliable indication of an APS employee's location, so actual location has been used for the report this year.

Table 6.13: Defence workforce by employment location as at 30 June 2020

NSW

QLD

SA

TAS

VIC1

WA

ACT2

NT

O/S3

Total

Permanent force4

Navy

6,453

810

169

21

2,085

2,716

1,923

653

197

15,027

Army

5,351

12,344

1,800

52

3,047

904

3,025

2,816

288

29,627

Air Force

4,294

3,380

1,918

10

1,105

273

2,220

924

317

14,441

Subtotal

16,098

16,534

3,887

83

6,237

3,893

7,168

4,393

802

59,095

Reserves5

Navy

1,081

475

104

86

303

329

1,168

83

3

3,632

Army

5,385

4,965

1,651

500

3,489

1,992

1,002

644

4

19,632

Air Force

1,569

1,404

659

60

423

214

1,176

109

5,614

Subtotal

8,035

6,844

2,414

646

4,215

2,535

3,346

836

7

28,878

Total ADF

24,133

23,378

6,301

729

10,452

6,428

10,514

5,229

809

87,973

APS6

Total APS

2,502

1,245

2,086

75

3,451

456

7,298

206

135

17,454

Notes:

Figures in this table are based on substantive location for the ADF and actual location for the APS.

  1. Victorian figures include individuals located in Albury NSW.
  2. Australian Capital Territory figures include individuals located in Jervis Bay (Commonwealth), Queanbeyan (NSW) and Bungendore (NSW).
  3. Individuals posted overseas for reasons including long-term duty, training, exchange and liaison.
  4. Permanent force (Service Categories 7 and 6) does not include ADF Gap Year participants (Service Option G).
  5. Reserves include all members (Service Categories 5, 4 and 3) and Reservists undertaking continuous full-time service (Service Option C).
  6. Includes paid and unpaid employees, which covers full-time, part-time, ongoing and non-ongoing employees. The 30 June 2020 figures for the APS include 1,172 APS employees who are also counted as Reserve members.
Table 6.14: Star-ranked officers as at 30 June 2020

Star-ranked officers1

2019–20 engagements2

2019–20 separations

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Four-star

Navy

Army

1

1

Air Force

Three-star

Navy

3

3

1

1

Army

3

3

Air Force

2

2

1

1

Two-star

Navy

8

2

10

1

1

1

1

Army

18

4

22

4

1

5

1

1

Air Force

8

1

9

3

3

3

1

4

One-star

Navy

38

6

44

8

2

10

3

3

Army

51

9

60

11

4

15

7

1

8

Air Force

32

6

38

9

3

12

7

1

8

Total

164

28

192

36

11

47

23

3

26

Notes:

  1. Figures in this table show members in Service Categories 7 and 6 (Permanent Service), at their substantive rank.
  2. Figures in this table show substantive promotions only.
Table 6.15: APS Senior Executive Service employees as at 30 June 2020

Total Senior Executive Service1

2019–20 engagements2, 3

2019–20 separations2, 4

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Senior Executive

Secretary

1

1

Band 3

7

3

10

1

1

2

1

1

Band 25

22

11

33

5

2

7

3

1

4

Band 16

50

50

100

5

1

6

8

3

11

Chief of Division

Grade 2

7

1

8

1

1

2

Grade 1

2

2

Total

89

65

154

11

4

15

12

6

18

Notes:

  1. Figures in this table show employee numbers at their substantive level, including employees on long-term leave (6), secondment (6) and temporary transfer to other departments (5).
  2. Gains and losses do not reflect movement of officers between levels in each of the Senior Executive Service and Chief of Division streams.
  3. Engagement figures include new engagements and transfers from other agencies only.
  4. Separation figures include resignations, retirements, redundancies, and promotions and transfers to other departments.
  5. Senior Executive Service Band 2 includes Medical Officer Grade 6.
  6. Senior Executive Service Band 1 includes Medical Officer Grade 5.
Table 6.16: APS Executive Level employees and below, by gender and classification as at 30 June 2020

30 June 2020 headcount

2019-20 engagements

2019-20 separations

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Executive Level

Executive Level 2

1,162

493

1,655

49

45

94

102

44

146

Executive Level 1

2,218

1,387

3,605

127

139

266

193

123

316

Subtotal

3,380

1,880

5,260

176

184

360

295

167

462

Other staff

APS Level 6

2,912

2,198

5,110

300

261

561

273

190

463

APS Level 5

1,507

1,412

2,919

179

218

397

177

124

301

APS Level 4

681

1,027

1,708

84

185

269

76

108

184

APS Level 3

449

855

1,304

75

127

202

43

72

115

APS Level 2

358

374

732

191

121

312

91

52

143

APS Level 1

150

113

263

100

78

178

21

21

42

Subtotal

6,057

5,979

12,036

929

990

1,919

681

567

1,248

Total APS

9,437

7,859

17,296

1,105

1,174

2,279

976

734

1,710

Note:

Figures in this table show ongoing and non-ongoing employee substantive headcount numbers. Figures include paid, unpaid, full-time and part-time employees. Figures exclude SES employees. Figures exclude employees who do not exclusively identify as either male or female.

Table 6.17: APS employees by gender as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2020

30 June 20191

30 June 2020

Full time

Part time2

Total

Full time

Part time2

Total

Ongoing employees

Men

9,075

207

9,282

9,145

199

9,344

Women

6,421

965

7,386

6,790

964

7,754

Unspecified3

2

1

3

3

1

4

Total ongoing

15,498

1,173

16,671

15,938

1,164

17,102

Non-ongoing employees

Men

104

12

116

159

23

182

Women

85

15

100

153

17

170

Unspecified3

1

1

0

Total non-ongoing

190

27

217

312

40

352

Total APS employees

Men

9,179

219

9,398

9,304

222

9,526

Women

6,506

980

7,486

6,943

981

7,924

Unspecified3

3

1

4

3

1

4

Total

15,688

1,200

16,888

16,250

1,204

17,454

Notes:

Figures in this table show substantive headcount numbers. Figures include paid and unpaid employees.

  1. Some 30 June 2019 figures have been adjusted from what was reported in the Defence Annual Report 2018–19 to account for retrospective transactions.
  2. Part-time employees are those with weekly hours less than the standard hours. It does not relate to employees in part-time positions.
  3. Figures include employees who have identified as indeterminate, intersex or unspecified.
Table 6.18: ADF permanent (Service Categories 7 and 6), Gap Year (Service Option G) and Reserve forces (Service Categories 5, 4 and 3) and APS by gender as at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2020

30 June 20191

30 June 2020

Men

%

Women

%

Men

%

Women

%

Navy permanent2

Trained force

Officers

2,109

14.8%

561

3.9%

2,199

14.6%

621

4.1%

Other ranks

7,452

52.5%

2,042

14.4%

7,508

50.0%

2,162

14.4%

Training force

Officers

613

4.3%

202

1.4%

692

4.6%

230

1.5%

Other ranks

933

6.6%

291

2.0%

1,269

8.4%

344

2.3%

Total Navy

11,107

78.2%

3,096

21.8%

11,668

77.7%

3,357

22.3%

Army permanent2

Trained force

Officers

4,577

15.5%

904

3.1%

4,608

15.6%

942

3.2%

Other ranks

17,882

60.6%

2,740

9.3%

17,726

59.8%

2,823

9.5%

Training force

Officers

768

2.6%

249

0.8%

770

2.6%

228

0.8%

Other ranks

1,855

6.2%

593

2.0%

2,011

6.8%

466

1.6%

Total Army

25,190

85.4%

4,319

14.6%

25,217

85.1%

4,408

14.9%

Air Force permanent2

Trained force

Officers

3,372

23.5%

1,028

7.2%

3,436

23.8%

1,060

7.3%

Other ranks

6,709

46.8%

1,866

13.0%

6,418

44.5%

2,006

13.9%

Training force

Officers

603

4.2%

240

1.7%

615

4.3%

257

1.8%

Other ranks

277

1.9%

244

1.7%

415

2.9%

231

1.6%

Total Air Force

10,961

76.4%

3,378

23.6%

10,884

75.4%

3,554

24.6%

ADF permanent2

Trained force

Officers

10,058

17.3%

2,493

4.3%

10,243

17.3%

2,623

4.4%

Other ranks

32,043

55.2%

6,648

11.5%

31,652

53.6%

6,991

11.8%

Training force

Officers

1,976

3.4%

665

1.1%

2,038

3.4%

710

1.2%

Other ranks

3,181

5.5%

987

1.7%

3,836

6.5%

995

1.7%

Total ADF permanent

47,258

81.4%

10,793

18.6%

47,769

80.8%

11,319

19.2%

ADF Gap Year

Navy

53

9.4%

74

13.1%

67

11.3%

92

15.5%

Army

199

35.2%

82

14.5%

208

35.0%

78

13.1%

Air Force

73

12.9%

84

14.9%

66

11.1%

84

14.1%

Total ADF Gap Year

325

57.5%

240

42.5%

341

57.3%

254

42.7%

Reserves2,3

Navy

2,584

9.5%

760

2.8%

2,823

9.8%

809

2.8%

Army

15,947

58.6%

2,818

10.4%

16,648

57.6%

2,984

10.3%

Air Force

4,041

14.8%

1,065

3.9%

4,413

15.3%

1,201

4.2%

Total Reserves

22,572

82.9%

4,643

17.1%

23,884

82.7%

4,994

17.3%

APS2,4

Total APS

9,398

55.7%

7,486

44.3%

9,526

54.6%

7,924

45.4%

Notes:

Figures in this table show substantive headcount numbers. Percentage figures are calculated within each section, so that the subtotal for each section adds to 100 per cent. Percentages may not sum due to rounding.

  1. Some 30 June 2019 figures have been adjusted from what was reported in the Defence Annual Report 2018–19 to account for retrospective transactions.
  2. Figures exclude employees who do not exclusively identify as either male or female.
  3. Reserves include all members (Service Categories 5, 4 and 3) and Reservists undertaking continuous full-time service (Service Option C).
  4. Figures include paid, unpaid, full-time, part-time, ongoing and non-ongoing employees. The 30 June 2020 figures for the APS include 1,172 APS employees who are also counted as Reserve members.

ADF Gap Year program

The ADF Gap Year program aims to give Australian school-leavers and young adults an exposure to the military way of life and the roles and opportunities on offer in the ADF. It is full-time service and referred to as Service Option G in reporting. A total of 593 participants enlisted in the 2019 ADF Gap Year program (Navy, 125; Army, 300; Air Force, 168). A total of 616 participants have enlisted in the 2020 program (Navy, 145; Army, 301; Air Force, 170). As at 30 June 2020, 41 members from the 2019 program and 555 members from the 2020 program (a total of 596) were still participating.

Table 6.19: ADF Gap Year (Service Option G) participants as at 30 June 2020

Navy

Army

Air Force

ADF

Total

Men

Women

Indeterminate

Men

Women

Indeterminate

Men

Women

Indeterminate

Men

Women

Indeterminate

2019 Program

Participants

50

75

212

88

78

89

1

340

252

1

593

Separated or Reserves (Service Category 2)

21

18

23

8

9

13

1

53

39

1

93

Transferred to permanent ADF

21

40

134

47

61

68

216

155

371

Transferred to Reserves

48

25

7

8

55

33

88

Still participating in 2019 program

8

17

7

8

1

16

25

41

2020 Program

Participants

64

81

221

80

77

93

362

254

616

Separated or Reserves (Service Category 2)

4

3

19

8

9

8

32

19

51

Transferred to permanent ADF

1

2

1

3

1

5

3

8

Transferred to Reserves

2

2

2

Still participating in program

59

76

201

70

65

84

325

230

555

Reserve Service protection

The Defence Reserve Service (Protection) Act 2001 (DRSP Act) provides for the protection of ADF Reserve members in their civilian employment and education. The Act mitigates some of the employment and financial disadvantages that Reserve members may face when undertaking Defence service, making service easier to undertake and so enhancing Defence capability.

Under the DRSP Act, employers and education providers are prohibited from discriminating against Reserve members or hindering them from rendering Defence service. A Reserve member rendering Defence service is entitled to be absent from their employment during that service, and must be permitted to resume work after their Defence service ends. Education providers are required to make reasonable adjustments to accommodate a Reserve member’s Defence service. Under the DRSP Act, employers, education providers and others may be subject to criminal prosecution or civil penalties. An affected person may bring an action for compensation or an injunction in a court, or Defence may bring such an action on behalf of the affected person.

Since April 2019, telephone calls regarding Reserve service protection issues have been directed through the 1800-DEFENCE call centre. This service provides ADF Reservists and employers with extended access to advice, and Defence with accurate data collection on phone enquiries regarding issues related to the DRSP Act. Access to the call centre function proved particularly valuable during Operation BUSHFIRE ASSIST 2019–2020, when the call centre was operating for extended hours.

Between 1 July 2019 and 15 June 2020, 324 calls were received regarding enquiries related to the DRSP Act. Of these, 45 enquiries were resolved at the time of contact through the provision of general information regarding protections and obligations provided by the DRSP Act; 279 complex enquiries were referred to Employer Support and Service Protection staff for specific advice; 274 enquiries were resolved within nine business days; and the remaining enquiries are still open at the time of this report.

The number of enquiries in 2019–20 is commensurate with the number of enquiries reported for 2018–19.