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Management of human resources

The ATO’s workforce capability requirements are diverse and varied, with roles that span entry level administration and customer service, through to professional specialist roles. We have invested in developing our employer brand to attract and retain the very best candidates with a mix of expertise. Our employee value proposition distinguishes us within the public service and private industry, and positions us as offering meaningful, rewarding work, competitive conditions, and a culture that appeals to people who will lead us into the future.

We have a highly engaged workforce that is underpinned by a robust performance and recognition framework and supported by front-line human resource (HR) advisors providing timely, tailored and tangible solutions to address people and workforce challenges.

The ATO invests in providing contemporary, flexible learning solutions that build staff capabilities to complete priority work now and into the future. We continue to broaden our reach by offering staff a variety of ways to learn, beyond traditional classroom learning. Through technology-assisted products – including webinars, short learning events via ATO Learning Express, and online learning platforms, such as Lynda.com and Udemy – we provide staff with access to anywhere, any-time learning.

We use a capability framework to integrate our people system, particularly for job profiling, capability appraisals and learning and development activities. Capability focus areas in 2017–18 included internal and external client service skills, leadership, and digital and data capabilities. A rolling series of evaluations is completed on new and existing programs to ensure they continue to meet the needs of learners and business.

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Statistics on APS employees

Along with meeting our legislative obligations, we need to understand the make-up of our workforce, including its size, working patterns, diversity, skill sets, work distribution, accommodation requirements and employee retention.

Our workforce

The following tables provide statistics on our workforce

Employment by classification and gender, as at 30 June 2017
ATO employees – substantive positions, at 30 June 2017

Employment by classification and gender

at 30 June 2017

Ongoing

Non-Ongoing

Total

Male

Female

Indeterminate, Intersex, or Unspecified

Male

Female

Indeterminate, Intersex, or Unspecified

Male

Female

Indeterminate, Intersex, or Unspecified

Total

SES 3

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

SES 2

12

9

0

1

0

0

13

9

0

22

SES 1

110

74

0

1

0

0

111

74

0

185

EL2

769

628

0

9

9

0

778

638

0

1,416

EL1

1,606

1,587

0

6

3

0

1612

1590

0

3,202

APS 6

1,880

2,320

0

6

14

0

1886

2334

0

4,220

APS 5

922

1,255

0

3

11

0

925

1266

0

2,191

APS 4

1,214

1,822

0

6

34

0

1221

1857

0

3,078

APS 3

1,290

2,155

0

33

55

0

1338

2233

0

3,571

APS 2

266

494

1

57

70

0

555

1065

1

1,621

APS 1

23

15

0

0

0

0

208

701

0

909

Cadet

6

12

0

0

0

6

12

0

18

TOTAL

8,098

10,373

1

122

196

0

8653

11781

1

20,435

NOTE

The total staffing includes CASUAL staff in addition to ongoing and non-ongoing.

There were no non-ongoing or casual employees who identified as indeterminate, intersex or unspecified as at 30 June 2017.

Employment by classification and gender, as at 30 June 2018
ATO employees – substantive positions, at 30 June 2018

Employment by classification and gender

at 30 June 2018

Ongoing

Non-Ongoing

Total

Male

Female

Indeterminate, Intersex, or Unspecified

Male

Female

Indeterminate, Intersex, or Unspecified

Male

Female

Indeterminate, Intersex, or Unspecified

Total

SES 3

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

SES 2

17

11

0

1

0

0

18

11

0

29

SES 1

106

85

0

1

0

0

107

85

0

192

EL2

758

626

0

18

9

0

776

637

0

1,413

EL1

1,603

1,606

0

6

14

0

1609

1620

0

3,229

APS 6

1,909

2,382

0

6

17

0

1916

2401

0

4,317

APS 5

867

1,177

0

3

5

0

871

1182

0

2,053

APS 4

1,388

1,921

0

1

37

0

1389

1958

0

3,347

APS 3

1,081

1,923

0

54

61

0

1149

1996

0

3,145

APS 2

203

445

0

50

63

0

619

1217

6

1,842

APS 1

17

12

0

6

1

0

134

394

0

528

Cadet

6

10

0

0

6

10

0

16

TOTAL

7,955

10,200

0

146

207

0

8594

11513

6

20,113

NOTE

The total staffing includes CASUAL staff in addition to ongoing and non-ongoing.

There were no ongoing or non-ongoing employees who identified as indeterminate, intersex or unspecified as at 30 June 2018.

Employment type by Full-time, Part-time Status, Irregular/Intermittent
ATO employees – substantive positions, at 30 June 2017 and 30 June 2018

Employment type by Full-time, Part-time Status, Irregular/Intermittent

at 30 June 2017

at 30 June 2018

Ongoing

Non-Ongoing

Ongoing

Non-Ongoing

Non-Ongoing

Ongoing

Non-Ongoing

Ongoing

Non-Ongoing

Non-Ongoing

Full-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

Part-Time

Irregular or intermittent

Total

Full-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

Part-Time

Irregular or intermittent

Total

SES 3

2

0

0

0

0

2

2

0

0

0

0

2

SES 2

21

1

0

0

0

22

28

1

0

0

0

29

SES 1

174

1

10

0

0

185

177

1

14

0

0

192

EL 2

1,279

16

118

2

1

1,416

1,272

22

112

5

2

1,413

EL 1

2,810

8

383

1

0

3,202

2,828

13

381

7

0

3,229

APS 6

3,690

16

510

4

0

4,220

3,783

14

508

9

3

4,317

APS 5

1,908

14

269

0

0

2,191

1,779

8

265

0

1

2,053

APS 4

2,650

37

386

3

2

3,078

2,890

35

419

3

0

3,347

APS 3

2,918

52

527

36

38

3,571

2,440

96

564

19

26

3,145

APS 2

662

121

99

6

733

1,621

539

108

109

5

1,081

1,842

APS 1

28

0

10

0

871

909

23

7

6

0

492

528

Cadet

18

0

0

0

0

18

16

0

0

0

0

16

TOTAL

16,160

266

2,312

52

1,645

20,435

15,777

305

2,378

48

1,605

20,113

Diversity

The ATO strives to have a workforce that reflects the diversity of Australia’s population. A diverse workforce provides a broader range of skills, experience and opportunities for innovation. In our Diversity and inclusion plan 2017–19 we recognise six diversity groups that face unique barriers to inclusion and outline the four diversity and inclusion principles for which all employees share responsibility. In 2017–18, we increased our focus on culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD), gender equality and generational inclusion. During the year, we:

  • delivered the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employee secondment program, which resulted in two permanent staff placements
  • launched a CALD employee network across the ATO
  • launched our Gender equality action plan 2017–19
  • launched a generational inclusion initiative and employee network across the ATO

We were also:

  • awarded a gold employer status at the 2018 Australian LGBTI Inclusion Awards for the second year running – we were one of 12 employers across Australia to receive a gold rating for the Australian Workplace Equality Index (AWEI) and achieved highest ranking government employer
  • placed second in the Australian Network on Disability Access and Inclusion Index, which recognised the ATO as an inclusion leader for people with disability and as a leader in disability confident workplaces.

The following table shows the proportion of employees in our diversity groups and the subsequent one provides more details of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees.

Ongoing employees who identify as belonging to diversity groups, at 30 June 2018

Group

Percentage

Change from 2016–17

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

2.1

0.1

With disability

3.0

0

Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD)

21.5

–0.1

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans/transgender and intersex (LGBTI+)(b)

4.0

1.0

Mature age(c)

35.5

0.2

NOTES

(a) Information on gender equality (the sixth diversity group) is provided above in ATO employees – substantive positions, at 30 June 2018

(b) LGBTI+ results obtained from the 2018 Australian Public Service Employee Census.

(c) The number of mature age employees (50 years and older) is based on data we hold, rather than by asking staff to self-identify as mature age.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees
ATO Indigenous employees, by ongoing, non-ongoing and casual, at 30 June 2017 and 30 June 2018

Indigenous employee staffing

at 30 June 2017

at 30 June 2018

Ongoing

370

385

Non-ongoing (Inc. Full-Time, Part-Time & irregular or intermittent employees)

2

2

Casual

10

13

Total

382

400

Job streams

We use job streams and families to identify particular skills. While some skills lend themselves to particular work areas, others are found across the ATO.

ATO employees, by job family, at 30 June 2017 and 30 June 2018

Job family

At 30 June 2017
%

At 30 June 2018
%

Accounting/finance

1.4

1.3

Administration

5.5

5.3

Analytics/intelligence

4.9

5.5

Communication/marketing

1.7

1.6

Engagement, assurance and compliance

26.4

27.6

Entry level programs

3.0

1.8

Governance and performance

3.3

4.1

Human resources management

3.0

3.1

Information and organisation professionals

1.8

1.9

Information technology

8.4

8.6

Law

8.8

8.7

Other agencies(a)

0.0

0.0

Project management

3.4

3.1

Senior executive

2.0

1.9

Service delivery

26.4

25.5

TOTAL

100

100

NOTE

(a) Figure greater than zero when not rounded.

ATO employees, by business area, at 30 June 2017 and 30 June 2018(a)

Business area

At 30 June
2017

At 30 June
2018

Change
%

ATO Corporate

656

420

–36.0

ATO Executive(b)

15

16

6.7

ATO Finance

527

593

12.5

ATO People(c)

1,422

1120

–21.2

Business Reporting and Registrations

236

196

–16.9

Client Account Services

3,898

3,447

–11.6

Client Engagement Group Strategy and Performance

na

202

na

Customer Service and Solutions

375

306

–18.4

Debt

1,513

1,761

16.4

Design and Change Management

246

382

55.3

Enterprise Solutions and Technology

1,858

1,896

2.0

Indirect Tax

1,315

1,217

–7.5

Individuals

861

1,026

19.2

Intermediaries and Lodgment(d)

594

512

–13.8

Policy, Analysis and Legislation

147

159

8.2

Private Groups and High Wealth Individuals

2,019

2,135

5.7

Public Groups and International

1,378

1,506

9.3

Review and Dispute Resolution

670

660

–1.5

Small Business

953

950

–0.3

Smarter Data Program

702

599

–14.7

Superannuation

813

778

–4.3

Tax Counsel Network

237

232

–2.1

TOTAL

20,435

20,113

–1.6

NOTES

(a) Includes ongoing, non-ongoing and casual employees but excludes external contractors.

(b) Previously reported as the Office of the Commissioners.

(c) Includes entry level program participants (graduates, cadets, apprentices, the Evergreen Indigenous Advancement Program and Executive Assistant Advancement Program).

(d) Previously reported as the Tax Practitioner and Lodgment Strategy business line.

Locations

As at 30 June 2018, the ATO had 20,113 staff located in 36 sites across Australia. Along with the capital cities, there are sites in seven regional locations. The newest regional location is Gosford, which opened this year.

We actively manage 25 buildings as the head leaseholder. The ATO property portfolio is managed in accordance with the Commonwealth Property Management Framework.

Employment type by location
ATO employees, by location, at 30 June 2017 and 30 June 2018(a)(b)

Employment type by location

at 30 June 2017

at 30 June 2018

Ongoing

Non-Ongoing (Inc. Full-Time, Part-Time & irregular or intermittent employees)

Casual

Total

Ongoing

Non-Ongoing (Inc. Full-Time, Part-Time & irregular or intermittent employees)

Casual

Total

State

Location

NSW

Albury

632

25

460

1,117

606

21

437

1,064

Gosford

0

0

0

0

285

48

90

423

Newcastle

566

5

0

571

522

1

1

524

Sydney

3,347

61

462

3,870

3,214

58

299

3,571

Wollongong

318

9

159

486

318

9

149

476

VIC

Geelong

129

4

5

138

115

0

3

118

Melbourne

4,574

88

189

4,851

4,458

92

199

4,749

QLD

Brisbane

3,011

31

74

3,116

2,967

39

100

3,106

Townsville

308

1

12

321

298

2

9

309

SA

Adelaide

1,657

22

148

1,827

1,613

18

168

1,799

WA

Perth

951

16

24

991

922

17

2

941

TAS

Burnie

59

2

0

61

54

1

0

55

Hobart

503

4

94

601

490

3

132

625

NT

Alice Springs

2

0

0

2

1

0

0

1

Darwin

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

ACT

Canberra

2,414

50

18

2,482

2,291

44

16

2,351

Overseas

0

0

0

0

0

0

TOTAL

18,472

318

1,645

20,435

18,155

353

1,605

20,113

NOTES

(a) Includes ongoing, non-ongoing and casual employees but excludes contractors and others paid through a third party.

(b) Some regions are made up of multiple locations. Sydney includes Sydney CBD, Penrith and Parramatta, Brisbane includes Brisbane CBD, Chermside and Upper Mount Gravatt, and Melbourne includes Melbourne CBD, Dandenong, Box Hill and Moonee Ponds.

Employee retention and separations

Years of service for ongoing ATO employees, at 30 June

Years of service

At 30 June
2017

At 30 June
2018

Change
%

0–4 years

3,947

3,768

–4.5

5–9 years

3,990

3,229

–19.1

10–14 years

4,236

3,859

–8.9

15–19 years

3,229

4,205

30.2

20–24 years

547

726

32.7

25–29 years

974

789

–19.0

30–34 years

1,254

1,176

–6.2

35–39 years

252

355

40.9

40–44 years

40

43

7.5

45–49 years

1

4

300.0

50 years or more

2

1

–50.0

TOTAL

18,472

18,155

–1.7

Employee separations, 2016–17 and 2017–18

ATO employee separations

2016–17

2017–18

Change
%

Resignation

302

405

34.1

Age retirement

147

204

38.8

Redundancy

296

180

–39.2

Dismissal

29

26

–10.3

Movement to another agency

112

130

16.1

Invalidity and death

46

39

–15.2

TOTAL

932

984

5.6

Our employment arrangements

The policy outlining remuneration and conditions for Australian Public Service (APS) agencies is set by government. The guiding principle is that any increases are not to come at the cost of reduction in outputs or services – they must be offset by productivity improvements. More information about remuneration in the APS is available in the APSC's Remuneration report, available at apsc.gov.au.

The ATO's remuneration policy is in accordance with the government parameters that apply across the APS.

Workplace agreements

At 30 June 2018, we had 17 non-SES individual flexibility arrangements, varying the terms of the enterprise agreement for a specified time.

Employment conditions are set out in the ATO Enterprise Agreement.

Individual agreements, 2015–16 to 2017–18(a)

Level

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

Senior executive service (SES)

222

212

225

EL 2 and general employees

6

19

17

Total

228

231

242

NOTE

(a) The ATO did not have any employees on Australian Workplace Agreements during this time.

Employment Arrangement of Senior Executives and Non-Senior Executives
Employment arrangement of SES and non-SES employees

Employment Arrangements of Senior Executives and Non-Senior Executives

SES

Non-SES

Total

Enterprise agreement (1)

0

0

0

Enterprise agreement (2)

0

0

0

Individual flexibility arrangements

0

15

15

Australian workplace agreements

0

0

0

Common law contracts

0

0

0

Determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999

223

0

223

Total

223

15

238

Remuneration

Senior executive remuneration

The Remuneration Tribunal sets the remuneration and conditions for the Commissioner and provides a framework, and advice, used by the Commissioner to determine remuneration and conditions for Second Commissioners.

Total remuneration for staff in the senior executive service (SES) includes a notional component for provision of a motor vehicle and parking, and for superannuation calculated at 15.4% of 101% of base salary. In 2017–18, the salary ranges were:

  • SES Band 1: $169,108 to $199,911 (notional total remuneration $226,842 to $262,436)
  • SES Band 2: $220,048 to $252,700 (notional total remuneration $286,982 to $324,713)
  • SES Band 3: $286,326 to $328,624 (notional total remuneration $364,847 to $413,724).

Second Commissioners are eligible for performance pay under the Principal Executive Office Performance remuneration guidelines as determined by the Remuneration Tribunal. This applies to those who have acted in a Second Commissioner role for three months or more.

All other classification levels, including SES, do not have access to performance pay.

Non-senior executive remuneration

Base rates of pay and other remuneration arrangements are set for the majority of non-SES staff in the ATO enterprise agreement. The agreement includes provision for individual salary advancement subject to satisfactory performance and other assessment factors. The rates for 2017–18 are shown in the following table.

Salary Ranges by Classification level
Salary Ranges by Classification level

Salary Ranges by Classification level

2017/18

Minimum

Maximum

SES 3

286,326

328,624

SES 2

220,048

252,700

SES 1

169,108

199,911

EL 2

124,041

147,752

EL 1

103,071

112,369

APS 6 and equivalent

80,468

92,391

APS 5 and equivalent

74,527

79,008

APS 4 and equivalent

66,852

72,557

APS 3 and equivalent

60,013

64,746

APS 2 and equivalent

52,728

58,437

APS 1 and equivalent

46,627

51,497

Public affairs officer grade 3

125,347

125,347

Information technology officer grade 1

64,746

74,527

Graduate administrative assistant

60,013

61,563

Cadets while undertaking practical training in the workplace

46,627

51,497

Cadets while undertaking study

16,033

25,923

TOTAL

NOTE

Public affairs officer salary ranges are only applicable to employees engaged or promoted to these classifications on or before 30 June 2006. At 30 June 2018, there were no public affairs officers at grade 1 or 2.

Non-salary benefits

The ATO provides its staff with a range of non-salary benefits.

SES officers are entitled to:

  • a privately-plated motor vehicle, which may be used for private and official use, or cash in lieu of a motor vehicle
  • parking at work or cash in lieu of parking
  • an airline lounge membership if eight or more return trips are planned for the year.

Our Executive Level 2 employees are entitled to:

  • a taxable annual allowance of $1,689 in 2017–18 to assist with the purchase of items and services that help maintain or increase their level of professionalism, such as membership of a professional association
  • airline lounge memberships if they are likely to undertake eight or more return flights in the following year.

We offer our staff non-salary benefits in some circumstances:

  • our executive officers are offered an iPad or iPhone for work use, along with other employees who frequently travel, work remotely or manage a large number of staff
  • all employees who are likely to undertake 12 or more return flights in the following year can apply for airline lounge membership.

We also offer salary packaging to all ongoing employees, and employees with an individual agreement. We outsource salary packaging administration and novated leasing arrangements to an external company called Smartsalary. Our employees have access to salary packaging of the following items:

  • cars and utility vehicles (novated lease), with fringe benefits (FBT) applicable
  • car parking, with FBT applicable
  • superannuation, self-only, exempt from FBT
  • airline lounge membership, exempt from FBT
  • professional association membership fees and subscriptions, exempt from FBT.

Around 2,400 employees had salary packaging arrangements in place in 2017–18.

Work health and safety

The ATO has a number of obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act) and our own Enterprise Agreement. We take these obligations seriously, as the health and wellbeing of our workforce is critical to supporting engagement, productivity and serving the community.

Details of OHWS initiatives

Our vision for health and safety is a healthy, engaged and productive workforce. A range of programs support a safe workplace and the elimination or minimisation of work health and safety risks. Examples include:

  • software that prompts computer users to take regular recuperative breaks and provides stretch and exercise reminders
  • first aid services to support immediate and effective treatment where injuries or illnesses occur
  • consultation with our staff and their representatives about health and safety matters that affect them
  • continued use of strategies to support staff attendance and manage wellbeing.

We manage risks and issues in accordance with Chief Executive Instructions on risk management and work health and safety, and our enterprise risk management framework.

Our updated premium figure reduced to $960,800 for 2018–19. This is a reduction of 91% from our 2017–18 premium of $11.2 million (GST exclusive).

Results of OHWS initiatives

Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission performance indicators, 2015–16 to 2017–18

Indicator

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

P1.1 Incidence of injuries with five or more days lost time per 1,000 full-time equivalent employees

4.4

1.9

1.6

P1.2 Incidence of injuries with 30 or more days lost time per 1,000 full-time equivalent employees

3.1

1.0

0.6

P1.3 Incidence of injuries with 60 or more days lost time per 1,000 full-time equivalent employees

1.7

0.7

0.6

P4 Lost time injury (claims) frequency rate

3.0

1.1

0.9

C1 Average time taken (in calendar days from date of injury to lodging claim with Comcare)

101

109

80

R1 Percentage of claims with incapacity for 10 or more days and a return to work plan (%)

75%

54%

33%

R2 Quality of return to work (% achieving return to work on case closure)

67%

64%

39%

NOTE

Figures for previous years in this table may vary from those reported in past annual reports as Comcare may continue to accept claims for past years.

Statistics of Notifiable incidents

Notifiable incidents, 2015–16 to 2017–18

Incident

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

Dangerous occurrences

3

1

0

Serious personal injury

1

0

1

Death

0

0

1

TOTAL

4

1

2

Details of OHWS investigations

Two incidents were investigated during the year:

  • A worker was injured at a social team event. Approvals and controls for social events were subsequently updated, with no further incidents of this kind occurring.
  • A staff member death was notified. The death was found to not be work-related.

Carer recognition

The ATO is not responsible for the development, implementation, provision or evaluation of care supports and, therefore, section 8(3) of the Carer Recognition Act 2010 does not apply. We support carers in the workplace through our employment policies, including flexible hours, access to carers leave, and our network of Carers, Helpers and Interested Others in the ATO (CHIATO).