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Our performance

Getting More Australians Moving More Often

Key activities

In 2018–19, Sport Australia focused on encouraging Australians of all backgrounds, ages and abilities to get involved in sport and physical activity, including through the delivery of the Sporting Schools program and the Move It AUS campaign, which encourages all Australians to find 30 minutes a day to be physically active.

Sport Australia continued to encourage participation in sport and physical activity through the provision of targeted investment and support to NSOs, and in 2018–19 launched the Move It AUS grants program, which provided funds to promote Participation, Community Sport Infrastructure and Better Ageing to organisations across Australia. Sport Australia has also focused on enhancing our research agenda, to consolidate data, information and knowledge to enable us to achieve our strategic priorities.

Key activities undertaken in 2018–19 included:

Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

> Delivery of the Sporting Schools Program to 6,625 schools across Australia

> Development and implementation of a marketing program to support the Sporting Schools program operations

> Delivery of a national roadshow to engage with NSOs, Physical Activity Partners and Government to co-create a prioritised action plan for Sport Australia and partners aimed at ‘Helping Australians move throughout life’

> Development of the Schools Physical Literacy Framework in partnership with the Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation and finalisation and release of the Australian Physical Literacy Framework, with the support of key stakeholders including the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, departments of education and leading Australian physical literacy researchers.

Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels

> Delivery of bi-annual data releases for AusPlay, a national population tracking survey, including publication of the State of Play report series and a focused report on older Australians’ participation in sport and physical activity

> Launch of the Sport Australia brand and Move It AUS national physical activity awareness program, encouraging all Australians to find time to be physically active

> Development and implementation of the Move It AUS grants program to enhance the understanding and benefits of regular physical activity and improve access to sport and physical activity opportunities.

Our results

Table 1: Our results against strategic priority: Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Performance criteria

Increase in physical activity levels by Australian children

Target

Children in Australia aged 5 to 14 years participate in organised physical activity outside of school hours for at least 3.2 hours per week, on average

Result

3.97 hours

Supporting statement

The target of 3.2hrs was achieved in 2018–19, with AusPlay data showing children aged 5 to 14 participate for 3.97 hours on average.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018–2022, page 14. Portfolio Budget Statements 2018–19, program objective A, page 279.

Table 2: Our results against strategic priority: Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Performance criteria

An increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity in primary schools

Target

55 per cent of schools participating in the sporting schools program increase the number of hours dedicated to sport and physical activity, by at least 45 minutes, compared to the period prior to the introduction of the program

Result

30 per cent

Supporting statement

The target of 55 per cent was not achieved in 2018–19, with 30 per cent of schools on average reporting an increase of sport and physical activity of more than 45 minutes.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018–19, page 14.

AusPlay, first launched in October 2015, is a national population tracking survey funded and delivered by Sport Australia. AusPlay provides data on sport and physical activity participation for the Government, sport sector and Australian public, to help better understand the participation landscape and inform decision-making. In 2018–19, AusPlay published two releases, covering the 2017–18 financial year (released November 2018) and the 2018 calendar year (released April 2019).

The 2018 calendar year release shows that the average number of hours children aged 1 to 14 participate in organised sport and physical activity outside of school hours is 3.97 hours per week. This significantly exceeded the 2018–19 target of 3.2 hours and was higher than forward targets for the future three years. As a result, and in recognising that there is a limit to how much organised sport and physical activity children and their parents can afford in terms of time and money, the target has been redesigned for future periods. From 2019–20, the target will focus on increasing the percentage of children aged 5 to 14 who are active in organised sport or physical activity out-of-school hours for 3.2 hours per week or more. This target better reflects our strategic priority of getting greater engagement and involvement of youth and children in sport, and our broader focus of getting more Australians moving more often.

The Sporting Schools program continues to be Sport Australia’s key platform for embedding physical activity and increasing participation for children and youth in sport. Sporting Schools first commenced in 2015, and since then the total investment by the Australian Government in the program to 31 December 2019 will be $201 million. A further $41 million was announced in the 2019–20 Federal Budget and will fund the program through to 31 December 2020.

Sporting Schools continues to be in high demand across Australia, with a total of 5,890 primary schools and 735 secondary schools funded in 2018–19, well exceeding 2019 targets of funding 5,200 primary schools and 500 secondary schools. Total student attendances for 2018–19 was 1,765,354. This represented an increase of 6.4 per cent since 2017–18 and brings the total number of student attendances to 6.11 million since the Sporting Schools program commenced in 2015. At 30 June 2019, the Sporting Schools program had 8,303 schools registered, representing over 87 per cent of all schools across Australia.

In 2018–19, 57 per cent of funded primary schools reported that participating in the Sporting Schools program resulted in an increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity within their school. However, only 30 per cent of funded primary schools stated that involvement in the program increased the time dedicated to sport and physical activity by at least 45 minutes, in line with our target parameters. Schools reported that it was challenging to quantify this measure accurately, particularly as many schools have been participating in the Sporting Schools program for multiple terms, and no additional incentives have been available to schools to influence this outcome other than funding to deliver the existing program. As a result, and in recognising that there is a limited number of hours available within the confines of the Australian school curriculum, the target has been simplified for 2019–20 onwards to remove the time quantification of 45 minutes.

Case Study: Local Sporting Champions

In addition to Sporting Schools, in 2018–19 Sport Australia significantly expanded the Local Sporting Champions program. This program provides financial assistance for coaches, officials and competitors aged 12 to 18 participating in state, national or international championships.

As part of the 2018–19 Federal Budget announcement, the Local Sporting Champions Grant program received a total of $11.2 million increased investment over four years. The increased investment has allowed Sport Australia to implement two changes to benefit further Local Sporting Champion recipients:

> A recipient may receive a maximum of two grants per year, providing that one of the events attended is at the international level. Previously, a recipient could receive a maximum of one grant per year

> A recipient may receive, on top of the base grant of $500, additional top up if residing in a rural electorate ($50) and/or travelling support to the event ($100–$200).
In 2018–19, a total of 8,857 young Australians received Local Sporting Champion grants, compared to 5,844 in 2017–18. This included:

> 159 recipients receiving two grants

> 31 per cent of recipients receiving additional top up for residing in a rural electorate

> 74 per cent of recipients receiving additional top up for travelling support.

This program is helping to ensure that promising young Australians can stay engaged and involved with their chosen sports.

Table 3: Results against strategic priority: Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels.

Performance criteria

Increase in Australians, aged 15 and above, participating in physical activity

Target

An increase of 204,000 Australians aged 15 or more meeting current physical activity guidelines for their age group when compared to 2017–18

Result

217,000

Supporting statement

The target for 2018–19 has been achieved, with AusPlay data showing an increase of 217,000 Australians aged 15 and older meeting physical activity guidelines compared to the previous year.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018–2022, page 16. Portfolio Budget Statements 2018–19, program objective A, page 279.

Table 4: Results against strategic priority: Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels.

Performance criteria

Build awareness in all Australians, particularly parents, about the ways they can introduce sport and physical activity into daily living

Target

4 per cent of Australians recall the Move It campaign on a prompted basis

2 per cent of Australians recall the Move It campaign on an unprompted basis

Result

40 per cent prompted — average campaign awareness (phase 2) 23 per cent unprompted — average campaign awareness (phase 2)

Supporting statement

A baseline of an average campaign prompted (40 per cent) and unprompted (23 per cent) awareness has been established as this is the first year of this program. The latest Phase 2 (Feb to Jun 19) activity demonstrated an increase of 6 per cent for prompted awareness and 5 per cent for unprompted awareness.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018–2022, page 16.

The 2018 calendar year AusPlay release shows an increase of 217,000 Australians aged 15 and older meeting physical activity guidelines compared to the previous year. When factoring in population growth, this represents a greater than 1 per cent increase in Australian adults meeting the physical activity guidelines for their respective age group and exceeds the target of 204,000. AusPlay data shows that 90.3 per cent of Australian adults aged 15 and over participated in sport or physical activity at least once in the last 12 months, 82.4 per cent at least once per week and 63 per cent at least three times per week.

Participation in sport and physical activity by Australians aged 15 years and olderThe 2018 calendar year AusPlay release shows an increase of 217,000 Australians aged 15 and older meeting physical activity guidelines compared to the previous year. When factoring in population growth, this represents a greater than 1 per cent increase in Australian adults meeting the physical activity guidelines for their respective age group and exceeds the target of 204,000. AusPlay data shows that 90.3 per cent of Australian adults aged 15 and over participated in sport or physical activity at least once in the last 12 months, 82.4 per cent at least once per week and 63 per cent at least three times per week.In 2018–19, Sport Australia launched the Move It AUS campaign, a national physical awareness program which encourages all Australians to find 30 minutes a day to be physically active. The Move It AUS campaign, launched across television, cinema, radio, out of home, digital, mobile and social and search channels, was the first direct to consumer physical activity awareness program undertaken by Sport Australia, enabling us to drive awareness of the importance of sport and physical activity within the Australian population. The Move It AUS campaign and the Find Your 30 messaging aligns with the Department of Health’s recommended Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for adults, and was planned to reach 95 per cent of the target audience, representing approximately 7.8 million Australians.

Advertising channel effectiveness (prompted awareness) for Move It AUS was on average tracking at 34 per cent over the span of Phase 1 of the campaign (August—December 2018) and at 40 per cent over the span of Phase 2 of the campaign (February—June 2019). Average unprompted awareness was 25 per cent in Phase 1, and 23 per cent during Phase 2.

Table 5: Move It AUS advertising channel effectiveness results

Phase 1

Phase 2

(Aug–Dec 2018)

(Feb–June 2018)

Prompted Campaign Awareness (Average)

34%

40%

Prompted Campaign Awareness (Peak)

37%

46%

Uplift in Prompted Campaign Awareness

3%

6%

Unprompted Campaign Awareness (Average)

25%

23%

Unprompted Campaign Awareness (Peak)

33%

28%

Uplift in Unprompted Campaign Awareness

8%

5%

As no baseline data existed prior to the commencement of the campaign in August 2018, it was not possible to measure the uplift awareness pre and post campaign, as per stated targets of 4 per cent prompted and 2 per cent unprompted uplift. Results have therefore been reported as the average campaign awareness against the peak recorded for the purpose of evaluation uplift in that period. As Table 5 above shows, the uplift between peak prompted awareness and average awareness was measured at 3 per cent for Phase 1, and 6 per cent for Phase 2, and for unprompted awareness at 8 per cent for Phase 1 and 5 per cent for Phase 2, indicating that the campaign was successful in achieving an increase in prompted and unprompted awareness. Results from 2018–19 will be used as baseline data for future reporting against campaign awareness targets and an appropriate evaluation of uplift will be determined.

The campaign has achieved significant social media impact, with over 35 million views across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and over two million searches of Move it AUS or Find Your 30. Advertising tracking research conducted by Kantar has also shown that the Move It AUS awareness program has driven an improvement in attitude and behaviours towards a number of key measures around sport and physical activity. Survey participants have reported a shift in physical activity participation, with an increase of 7 per cent in participants reporting exercising four or more times per week.

The Move It AUS campaign received a ‘Highly Commended’ award for Best Cause-Related Sports Campaign at the Mumbrella Sports Marketing Awards in July 2019, which recognised the impact and results of the program in its first year.

In parallel to the Move It AUS public campaign, Sport Australia launched the Move It AUS grants programs, including Better Ageing, Participation, and Community Sport Infrastructure.

The objectives of the Move It AUS grant programs are to:

> Enhance the understanding and benefits of regular physical activity

> Improve access to sport and physical activity opportunities

> Enable regular engagement in sport and physical activity to:

— Get inactive people moving in their local communities

— Build awareness and understanding of the importance of physical activity across all stages of life

— Improve the system of sport and physical activity by targeting populations at risk of inactivity, across all life stages.

The Move It AUS grants program delivered investment of $28.9 million in Better Ageing and Participation grants to support 89 new community programs, with a combined expected reach of over 800,000 Australians. Grants of up to $2 million were allocated to implement new, local and community-based activities across Australia, targeting inactive sections of the population to build a more active Australia.

Recognising the importance of sporting infrastructure, Sport Australia commenced payments against the Government’s $102.5m Community Sport Infrastructure grant program where over 680 recipients were announced as successful. This program supports small to medium scale projects up to $500,000 to improve local community sport infrastructure which will support greater community participation in sport and physical activity and offer safe and more inclusive community sporting hubs.

In 2018–19, Sport Australia provided over $19 million in participation funding to NSOs and continued to work closely with the sports industry to support participation growth. Sport Australia has also undertook a review of the participation funding model, and from 1 July 2019 will be implementing a new investment framework. Funding will be based on core funding and capability, to ensure Sport Australia can best assist NSOs to grow participation and build the capacity and capability of their sports.

Case Study: Move It AUS — San Souci FootballClub

The Australian Government has invested more than $152 million to help Australians of all ages get more active through the Move It AUS Community SportInfrastructure grants program, the Move It AUS Better Ageing grants program and the MoveIt AUS Participation grants program. One grant recipient under the Community Sport Infrastructure grant was the San Souci Football Club.

During a visit to the San Souci Football Club to open their new facilities, Prime Minister Scott Morrison discussed our Move It AUS grants programs and explained why keeping active is important for all Australians. Prime Minister Morrison says the Community Sport Infrastructure grants are not just an investment in bricks and mortar, but an investment in local communities.

‘It’s the discussions you have around the BBQ or the tuckshop on the weekend when you’re working with other parents or along the sidelines. That’s where communities come together and that’s why you’ve got to make these investments and we’re just so pleased to do it, and to have the partnership with Sport Australia who are delivering this, I think is justtremendous.’

The San Souci Football Club received a Move It AUS Community Sport Infrastructure grant of $50,000, which was used to build new facilities, including a new clubhouse. Melissa Robertson, the San Souci Football Club President said:

‘To get a grant is just amazing, before we had the canteen, one little change room and a store room. It was extremely old and rundown. Now we have the clubhouse to rival the Taj Mahal.’

Building the capability of sport to create a robust, connected industry

Key activities

In 2018–19, Sport Australia focused on leading and supporting the sport industry to get Australians moving and help athletes perform at the highest level. Our focus has been on assisting our sport partners to evolve and move towards more efficient systems of governance and management, including through the One Management program, and continuing to set an example for integrity issues in sport, including child safety, diversity and inclusion.

In accordance with upholding these principles of good governance and child protection, Sport Australia is working cooperatively with the National Child Safety Office, NSOs and other national and state Government bodies to provide a leadership role to enable and support the sports industry for children’s safe participation in sport. This work also involves assisting sporting organisations’ navigation of and participation in the National Redress Scheme. Sport Australia invested significant resources into digital modernisation in 2018–19 through the Technology Roadmap project, including digital transformation of the ASC business and extending this capability out to the sport sector to be leveraged.

Key activities undertaken in 2018–19 included:

Building workforce capability across the sector

> Establishment of the One Management project to support sports to improve their operating model by integrating the sport’s strategy, finances and workforce

> Completed Phase 1 of the review of the sport governance principles, including publication of a report outlining the insights from the co-design workshops conducted through industry consultation

> Development of guidelines for the inclusion of transgender and gender diverse people in sport, in partnership with the Australian Human Rights Commission and the Coalition of Major Professional and Participation Sports

> Conduct of educational workshops to share best practice and build capability for coaches, officials and paid administrators across the sector

> Launch of the Play for Purpose charity raffle.

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sport sector

> Development of a cloud-based platform to integrate NSOs’ digital applications to allow them to consolidate the data from across their sport and better understand their customers

> Development of a data analytics platform to support increased data use and insight generation by NSOs

> Development of the SportAUS Connect platform, a shared platform to connect the sectors’ organisations and software vendors, and piloted with one sport, as part of the One Management Program

> Delivery of digital strategy workshops and guidance to improve sector capability.

Our results

Table 6: Our results against strategic priority: Building workforce capability across the sector

Performance criteria

Improving the organisational capability of targeted national sporting organisations (NSOs)

2017–18

target

Average overall score on Sport.Scan for 23 targeted NSOs is at least 75 per cent

Result

73 per cent

Supporting statement

The average overall score for 23 targeted NSOs was 73 per cent, just short of the target of 75 per cent. Two of the 23 NSOs did not complete all requested information by the due date which has impacted results. Excluding these two NSOs, the overall score was 74 per cent.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018–2022, page 22. Portfolio Budget Statements 2018–19, program objective A, page 279.

Table 7: Our results against strategic priority: Building workforce capability across the sector

Performance criteria

Improving the financial performance and capability of national sporting organisations (NSOs)

2017–18

target

Less than 15 per cent of assessed NSOs and NSODs are rated overall as ‘Higher Risk’ under the annual financial assessment tool

Result

8 per cent

Supporting statement

The annual financial assessment resulted in 8 per cent of NSOs/NSODs rated as Higher Risk

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018–2022, page 22.

Sport Australia has continued to implement improvements to Sport.Scan, the self-assessment tool used to measure the progress and maturity of an NSO’s organisational capability. Sport.Scan is conducted as a part of the Annual Sport Performance Review (ASPR) process undertaken by Sport Australia, which covers the 23 sports that receive the largest share of Sport Australia funding. In 2018–19, the average overall score on Sport.Scan for the 23 targeted NSOs was 73 per cent, just short of the 75 per cent target. Two NSOs did not fully complete the Sport.Scan tool, which impacted results. In 2019–20, Sport Australia will be undertaking a review of Sport.Scan, with a greater emphasis on organisational behaviours which support the development of organisational capability.

To support NSOs in improving their organisational capability, Sport Australia conducted a range of educational workshops, including:

> Company Director Training to increase the understanding of best practice governance

> One Management Forum to support exchange of relevant information, and provide examples and lessons from sports that have progressed One Management implementation

> NSO Integrated Learning Experiences workshops to support NSOs in the development and implementation of child safe policies.

A key focus for organisational capability has been the rollout of the One Management project, to support sports which operate under a federated governance model to achieve a central approach to management. The One Management project, currently targeting 12 NSOs, aims to transition sports to a whole of sport business model across strategy, workforce and financial management, resulting in more efficient management processes, improved decision-making and a reduction in administration and overhead costs. To reflect Sport Australia’s focus on the One Management project, our future performance criteria will be updated to reflect the implementation of OneManagement.

Sport Australia continued to work closely with NSOs and NSODs on improving financial performance and financial capability. The ASPR includes an annual financial assessment tool, which reviews the financial position, financial performance and financial capability and management of funded NSOs. The ASPR process informs the level of monitoring frequency and support provided by Sport Australia to NSOs, with those rated as ‘higher risk’ being frequently monitored to ensure good financial management practices. In 2018–19, 8 per cent of NSOs were rated as ‘higher risk’, well below the target of 15 per cent. To support NSOs in improving their financial capability, Sport Australia led the Sport Finance Network to connect NSO CEOs, CFOs and finance staff, including workshops held in five locations across Australia. The objective of the workshops was to build finance networks across the sector and facilitate learning and the sharing of contemporary financial practices.

A significant area of focus for Sport Australia is supporting sports to be less reliant on government funding by increasing external revenue sources. In 2018–19, Sport Australia endorsed the Play for Purpose Charity and Sports Raffle, as a fundraising opportunity for Australian sporting organisations. Play for Purpose is a collaboration between the 50–50 Foundation, Tabcorp’s Charitable Games Division and the Australian Sports Foundation, aiming to raise money for charitable grassroots sporting projects. Play for Purpose is 100 per cent not-for-profit and is free for clubs to participate, with 50 per cent of the ticket contribution directly supporting the sporting club and the remaining portion of ticket sales used to fund the $500,000 worth of prizes in the raffle. The first combined Play for Purpose Charity and Sports Raffle went on sale on 18 December 2018 and as at 30 June 2019 there were 195 sporting clubs registered with Play for Purpose.

Table 8: Our results against strategic priority: Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

Performance criteria

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

Target

30 per cent of NSOs completing the organisational development tool, Sport.Scan, have an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above.

10 per cent of NSOs completing the organisational development tool, Sport.Scan, have an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above.

Result

62 per cent of NSO’s completing Sport.Scan achieved an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above.

14 per cent of NSO’s completing Sport.Scan achieved an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above.

Supporting statement

The digital maturity model is based on the responses from 21 sports to 9 questions from the Sport.Scan survey. It measures the level of maturity the NSO has in place to develop and implement their digital strategy. Both targets were achieved.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018–2022, page 23.

Sport Australia has put significant resources into improving the digital maturity of the sport sector, and in leading the industry by embracing digital solutions. Results from Sport.Scan show that 62 per cent of NSOs completing Sport.Scan achieved an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above, with 14 per cent achieving a score of 60 or above, achieving our stated targets.

Sport Australia has supported sports in the development of digital strategies, a key foundation for digital maturity. Sport Australia has delivered Design Thinking led workshops with 20 sports, which included participation from across the sport sector, including NSOs, state sporting organisations, sporting clubs and consumers. In total, 30 sports have now undertaken this process since 2017.

In 2018–19, we commenced work to adapt digital infrastructure built for Sport Australia to support sport requirements, as a part of the broader Technology Roadmap program. This includes the design and development of a sport customer relationship management system, known as the Partner Portal, to drive efficiencies and improve capability for sports. The Partner Portal provides a unified experience and access point for sport partners to engage and exchange data with Sport Australia, the AIS and other sector partners. Sport Australia also worked with two sports to establish a data analytics platform, to bring together data from multiple sources and support sports in strategic decision-making. An example of this was the longitudinal analysis of an athlete and their pathway over time, overlaid with ABS population density data to identify acquisition and retention opportunities for the sport.

Sport Australia also developed SportAUS Connect, a cloud-based integration platform to connect sport sector organisations and software vendors, and successfully delivered a pilot implementation with Cycling Australia. The pilot included integration with the Cycling Australia website, membership, race entry and customer relationship management platforms. The SportAUS Connect platform will be further developed and implemented with sports in the One Management program in 2019–20, to help enable sports to respond to consumers’ needs in the digital world.

Case Study: SportAUS Connect

SportAUS Connect is an industry-wide platform, designed to support the transition to a digitally connected sport sector.

The sport sector is large, with around 50,000 organisations, many of which are small volunteer-run entities with little in-house digital technology. A rapidly changing and complex technology landscape has made it difficult for sports to consolidate, manage and secure their data, which is often stored in multiple systems across a sport.

Drawing on learnings from government, health and the higher education sectors, Sport Australia is establishing a digital platform delivery capability and has adopted cloud technology practices to develop SportAUS Connect.

SportAUS Connect is a digital platform that provides sports with the ability to integrate various applications and consolidate data from across their sport, to provide a seamless customer experience and enable the sport to connect with and understand their customers more clearly. This includes integrating functions such as customer relationship management, membership, and event and competition services.

After a successful pilot with Cycling Australia, Sport Australia is working with sports in the One Management program to build-out the SportAUS Connect platform in 2019–20.

Creating national pride and inspiration through international sporting success

Key activities

Throughout 2018–19, the AIS continued to evolve its strategic priorities based on the agreed vision and success factors reflected in the national sport plan, Sport 2030, and the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024. The AIS has continued to implement an enhanced organisational structure and, along with the new enterprise operational model, will enable the organisation to lead the Australian high performance sector more effectively.

The AIS also defined new success measures, which include more sports consistently producing multiple medallists over multiple cycles, effectively inspiring the next generation, with a focus primarily on Olympic and Paralympic Games, along with Commonwealth Games.

Key activities undertaken in 2018–19 included:

Leading and enabling a united, collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

> Development of a new performance investment framework, providing longer-term stability for NSOs and enabling the AIS to respond to shifting needs across the high performance landscape

> Development and launch of the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024, which was approved by National Institute Network Directors, endorsed by the Committee of Sport and Recreation Officers and referred to the Meeting of Sport and Recreation Ministers for final approval

> Invested in innovative solutions and technology for prioritised sports and promoted the growth of new knowledge and expertise for high performance sport

> Launched a revised model for sports science and sports medicine, including the appointment of National Network leads to plan, coordinate and deliver sports science and sports medicine expertise better to ensure Australia’s athletes get the right support at the right time

> Promoted success and high performance messaging within the Australian community, in partnership with NSOs and athletes, to enhance Australia’s reputation as a sporting nation.

Evolving a system-wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community

> Established an Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement (AW&E) branch within the AIS and launched the AW&E Framework, with a commitment to developing sport-specific versions in 20 sports

> Provided funding and support to appoint 18 AW&E advisers in 2018–19, with a commitment to 20 NSOs to provide direct support to athletes

> Launched the National Mental Health Referral Network, to provide expert mental health support and advice to Australian athletes and coaches. Delivered the Lifeline Community Custodian program, in partnership with Lifeline, to help raise awareness of mental illness in communities around Australia.

Our results

Table 9: Our results against strategic priority: Leading and enabling a united, collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

Performance criteria

Percentage of high performance funded sports rated by the AIS as achieving their benchmark targets

Target

On average, 85 per cent of high performance funded NSOs’ performance targets are achieved

Result

87 per cent

Supporting statement

87 per cent of Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth NSOs achieved their 2018–19 performance targets.

Table 10: Our results against strategic priority: Leading and enabling a united, collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

Performance criteria

Community perceptions of Australia’s international sporting success

Target

Baseline metrics established through a Sport Australia Community Engagement Monitor regarding the public perceptions of Australia’s international sporting success

Result

Significant progress

Supporting statement

Sport Australia and the AIS are developing a ‘Community Perceptions of Sport Survey’ that will be used to measure performance against this target. Initial results are expected from September 2019.

The AIS continued to support NSOs to achieve their performance targets and build capability within sports and more broadly across the sport sector. The AIS has developed a new engagement model with NSOs, to broaden access to resources, support and expertise within the AIS and the high performance system. To measure success, high performance targets are agreed between the AIS and each NSO at the beginning of each reporting cycle. Performance targets may include medal performances at benchmark events or other longer-term outcome-focused objectives. In 2018–19, 36 of 41 sports (87 per cent) achieved their performance targets, exceeding the target of 85 per cent. Sixteen sports met or exceeded medal targets, with cycling a standout performer, with a total of ten medals, six of which were gold, at 2019 world championship events.

In addition to a new engagement model, a key project designed to support NSOs to achieve performance outcomes was the development and launch of the new high performance investment framework. The new framework aims to provide longer-term stability for NSOs and introduces longer-term baseline funding across four year (Olympic) cycles, enabling better planning and continuity, and contestable impact resourcing that provides the system with a level of agility to seize new opportunities. Using this approach, the majority of NSOs have had current levels of funding guaranteed through to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. A strategic projects pool has also been established to be invested into sports for targeted campaigns or project support ahead of Tokyo 2020.

The Gold Medal Ready program was launched in August 2018, a joint initiative with the Australian Army to assist Australian athletes to deliver their best performance under pressure. Two camps were undertaken in 2018–19, with a total of 135 athletes, 19 coaches and 17 performance staff spanning 12 Olympic sports taking part. The program, along with other key initiatives such as the para sport equipment program and the team management program, are designed to enable a united, collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes and teams to achieve podium success.

Work has progressed in 2018–19 to measure and monitor community perceptions of Australia’s international sporting success. Sport Australia and the AIS are developing a Community Perceptions of Sport Survey, with exploratory research for the survey being conducted from June to August 2019. This research will inform the design of an ongoing tracking survey of community perceptions, and will be used to establish the baseline results. Results are expected to be available in September 2019, with quarterly reporting implemented in 2019–20.

Case Study: Team Management Program

The AIS Team Management Program is a collaboratively-designed series of modules to equip sport management teams with the mindsets, skills and behaviours important for success. The program recognises that being a member of a Management Team at a multi-sport event is varied and complex, and sports have identified that Performance Directors, Head Coaches and support staff would all benefit from learning more about how to successfully navigate their roles as part of that team.

The program, launched in March 2019, involves a number of modules delivered both face to face and through online channels. Each module has a specific focus, using the challenges and complexities posed before, during and post multi-sport Games experiences, and participants are challenged to work across sports to seek multiple perspectives and access different expertise and support in their roles.

Facilitated by the AIS Performance People and Teams area, the program will deliver to 18 Olympic and Paralympic sports and 45 participants over two programs running through to March 2020. The program delivers on the AIS strategic priority to build capability and capacity in our performance people.

Case Study: Para-sport Equipment

The AIS Applied Technology and Innovation branch is leading work to identify and solve strategically important problems with technology and innovation on the ethical frontiers of sporting performance to support our athletes for podium success.

Two champion para-athletes Dylan Alcott (tennis, basketball) and Erik Horrie (rowing) have been at the forefront of two projects led by the team.

Ahead of the 2018 World Rowing Championships, the AIS was approached by the NSW Institute of Sport to develop a new seat design for para-athlete Erik Horrie.

A project team was setup to work on the design, including the AIS Applied Technology and Innovation team, Paralympics Australia and Toyota Australia (Olympic and Paralympic partner).

Para-rowing had four key parameters that were required to be met by the project team. The seat design had to be minimum weight possible, increase athlete stroke length, allow the athlete to produce more power, and reduce risk of a pressure injury to skin and muscle tissue.

The final design was used by Erik in the 2018 World Rowing Championship, where he went on to win the PR1 Men’s Single Scull in the chair’s first competitive outing.

The same team was also responsible for producing a custom-designed wheelchair for six- time tennis Grand Slam champion Dylan Alcott and his doubles partner Heath Davidson.

‘Quite early on we realised that the standard architecture of the wheelchair tennis chair that Dylan was using would not allow us to create a performance-based interface between the athlete and the frame,’ said AIS Senior Sport Engineer Matt Crawford.

The project team was also working on how to minimise pressure injuries, which required them to use a pressure map to identify the main points of contact, similar to what is used in automotive and aircraft seating and the disability sector.

Once the seat has been designed, the team used data, technology and engineering to fine tune the chair to maximise performance and comfort.

Table 11: Our results against strategic priority: Evolving a system wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community

Performance criteria

Develop system capability to provide for athlete personal development and wellbeing

Target

75 per cent of NSOs receiving athlete wellbeing and engagement specific funding have a national framework in place that was developed in conjunction with the AIS.

75 per cent of NSOs receiving athlete wellbeing and engagement funding have appointed a National Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement Manager.

Result

Achieved

Supporting statement

Of the 20 NSOs receiving Athlete Wellbeing & Engagement (AW&E) funding from the AIS, 18 NSOs (90 per cent) have appointed AW&E National Managers and 15 NSOs (75 per cent) have AW&E Frameworks.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018–2022, page 29.

Since the launch of the AW&E branch in June 2018, a number of initiatives have been launched aimed at providing NSOs with the necessary support and capability to improve athlete and coach personal development and wellbeing. This includes initiatives across mental health, conduct and professionalism, personal development, career and education, and athlete engagement.

Direct funding for AW&E initiatives was given to 20 NSOs, and of these 90 per cent have appointed AW&E National Managers, exceeding the target of 75 per cent. The AIS is continuing to work with two remaining sports to make appointments in the next financial year and has committed to extending this to 26 NSOs. The AW&E Manager roles report into the NSO High Performance Managers or CEOs to ensure that athlete wellbeing is considered when decisions are made within the high performance environment. The AW&E Managers are supported in their role through a national curriculum of professional development that includes a Certificate IV in Career and Development. The national expansion of these services has enhanced direct support for athletes, and has also led to greater collaboration across Australia’s high performance sporting system.

The AIS has also worked with funded NSOs to develop AW&E Frameworks. Fifteen of the 20 funded NSOs have an AW&E Framework endorsed by the AIS in place, meeting the target of 75 per cent, and a further two NSOs have drafted frameworks and are progressing with final sign off.

The Mental Health Referral Network was launched in March 2019, providing funded athletes and coaches with access to AIS endorsed psychologists and mental health practitioners across the country, with the program extending out to psychiatrists and neuropsychologists. The network currently has 27 clinical psychologists and eight psychiatrists contracted to provide expert mental health support and advice to Australia’s elite athletes and coaches. As of 20 June 2019 there has been over 100 referrals into the Mental Health Referral Network.

Case Study: National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024

The AIS is committed to leading and enabling a united and collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success. In consultation with the National Institute Network, NSOs and Games delivery partners, the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024 was developed to recognise the important role of all high performance system partners in providing opportunities for both aspiring athletes moving through the athlete development pathway and in fostering lifelong physical activity. The strategy is endorsed by the Committee of Australian Sports and Recreation Officers and has been referred to the Meeting of Sport and Recreation Ministers for final approval.

The release of the strategy signals the first time that all federal and state/territory sport agencies have signed up to a joint high performance strategy with focus on Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth Games outcomes.

The National High Performance Sport Strategy positions Australia’s high performance institutes, academies and national sporting organisations under a national framework, and strengthens relationships with government, communities, academic institutions, industry and the private sector, moving towards a common goal of national pride and Inspiration through international sporting success.