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Social media

Twitter

Twitter (@aihw) continues to be one of our primary social media platforms for communicating with our stakeholders.

Table 3 .4: Top 10 AIHW topics/reports based on Twitter engagements, 2019–20

Rank

Topic

Engagements

1

Housing and homelessness

1,037

2

Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs

552

3

Chronic conditions

548

4

Australia’s welfare

417

5

Children’s health

316

6

Maternal health

307

7

Aged care

210

8

Deaths and life expectancy

210

9

Cancer

183

10

Endometriosis

158

In 2019–20, we published 211 tweets, with about 845,000 ‘impressions’ (see Box 3 .1: Twitter analytics terms).

We had 21,160 followers as at 30 June 2020—an increase of about 16% compared with the previous year (18,200 followers in 2018–19). The topics and reports with the highest level of engagement in 2019–20 are detailed in Table 3 .4: Top 10 AIHW topics/reports based on Twitter engagements, 2019–20 and Figure 3.4: Top 6 topics by Twitter impressions, 2019–20 and Figure 3.5: Top 6 topics by Twitter engagement rates (%), 2019–20.

Impressions:

Number of times users saw the tweet on Twitter.

Engagements:

Total number of times users interacted with a tweet, including retweets, replies, follows, likes and clicks on hashtags, links, avatar, username and tweet expansion.

Engagement rate:

Number of engagements divided by the total number of impressions. Rates between 33 and 100 reactions for every 1,000 followers (0.33% and 1%) are considered to be very high.

Figure 3.4: Top 6 topics by Twitter impressions, 2019–20 Column chart showing the top 6 topics by twitter impressions. Housing and homelessness 65090, Australia’s welfare 2019 37423, Chronic conditions 45507, Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs 33856, Aged care 26777, Children’s health 25469
Figure 3.5: Top 6 topics by Twitter engagement rates (%), 2019–20 Column chart showing the top 6 topics by twitter engagement rates. Chronic conditions 11%, Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs 9.2%, Housing and homelessness 8.6%, Australia’s welfare 6.3%, Primary health care 5.4%, Deaths 4.4%.

LinkedIn

In 2019–20, we experienced significant growth in the number of followers and the engagement rate on LinkedIn. We achieved this growth by implementing a new content strategy that involved cross-posting content from Twitter to LinkedIn, posting original content regarding conferences and awareness-raising events, and increasing the CEO’s LinkedIn presence with thought-leadership-style articles that we shared on our corporate page.

In 2019–20, we published approximately 75 LinkedIn posts. We had 3,594 followers as at 30 June 2020—tripling our 1,009 followers in 2018–19. Our average engagement rate (Box 3 .2: LinkedIn analytics terms) was 5.7% in 2019–20, with the benchmark sitting around 3–4% for similar government agencies and health associations. The posts with the top 10 LinkedIn engagements and LinkedIn impressions are shown in Table 3.5: Top 10 AIHW posts based on LinkedIn engagements, 2019–205 and Table 3 .6: Top 10 AIHW posts based on LinkedIn impressions, 2019–20.

Note: This covers an 11-month period from 1 August 2019 to 30 June 2020 as previous LinkedIn analytics are unavailable.

Impressions:

Number of times users viewed the post.

Engagements:

Total number of times users interacted with a post, including clicks, likes, shares, comments, follows, link clicks and video views.

Engagement rate:

Number of engagements divided by the total number of impressions. Rates between 33 and 100 reactions for every 1,000 followers (0.33% and 1%) are considered to be very high.

Barry Sandison standing at a lectern delivering a presentation
Mr Barry Sandison, CEO at the Family and Relationship Services Australia National Conference, Hunter Valley, November 2019

Table 3.5: Top 10 AIHW posts based on LinkedIn engagements, 2019–20

Rank Topic

1

AIHW staff at the Health Information Management Association of Australia Limited (HIMAA) conference, 2019

2

Ms Vicki Bennett at the 19th International Federation of Health Information Management Associations (IFHIMA) Congress in Dubai, 2019

3

New MyHospitals reporting platform and AHPF

4

Australian Public Service (APS) census results

5

Housing Data Dashboard

6

Tableau #MakeoverMonday featuring AIHW homelessness data set

7

Maternal health—Australia’s mothers and babies 2018

8

CEO Mr Barry Sandison at the Family and Relationship Services Australia National Conference, 2019

9

Patterns of health service use by people with dementia in their last year of life: New South Wales and Victoria

10

Australia’s children

Table 3 .6: Top 10 AIHW posts based on LinkedIn impressions, 2019–20

Rank Topic

1

CEO Mr Barry Sandison at the Family and Relationship Services Australia National Conference, 2019

2

AIHW staff at the HIMAA conference, 2019

3

Ms Vicki Bennett at the 19th IFHIMA Congress in Dubai, 2019

4

First national report on Endometriosis in Australia: prevalence and hospitalisations

5

New MyHospitals reporting platform and AHPF

6

Australia’s children

7

Hospitalised sports injury in Australia, 2016–17

8

APS census results

9

Tableau #MakeoverMonday featuring AIHW homelessness data set

10

Australia’s welfare 2019

Multimedia

In 2019–20, we built on our social media presence through the implementation of our new social media strategy and policy. We continued to use Twitter for targeted communication, but also increased content and engagement on our secondary channel, LinkedIn, while utilising YouTube as a support platform.

To better reflect current social media trends and enhance our engagement with stakeholders, we developed and broadened our suite of digital products through the use of:

  • infographics
  • video animations
  • GIFs (moving images).

We will continue developing this strategy for standard product releases in 2020–21, including the introduction of an AIHW podcast and development of paid-for media (sponsored/promoted social media content campaigns).

Guest speakers

Our guest speaker series aims to bring in external speakers to talk to staff about interesting and relevant topics. In 2019–20, 5 experts spoke about a range of topics (Table 3 .7: Guest speaker topics, 2019–20). Guest speaker events cancelled from February onwards to ensure staff safety amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Table 3 .7: Guest speaker topics, 2019–20

Topic

Department of Health and its role working with the AIHW

Australian Social Progress Index

Secondary use of primary care electronic medical record and administrative data to inform health policy and practice: examples and lessons learned from Canada

Australian Health Research Alliance’s Transformational Data Collaboration

Literature review to inform My Health Record

Legal and ethical challenges and solutions in the era of big data: a UK perspective

Role of data in the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse

Mental Health Month

Insights Workshop series

In September, we continued our Insights Workshop series by hosting a workshop with the NGO sector about collaborating to achieve common objectives. This workshop provided an opportunity for health and welfare NGO agencies across Australia to share ideas and experiences and forge new collaborations to drive data improvements.

Attendees were presented with information about our data resources, insights into new and innovative projects and a ‘show and tell’ of our data tools. External guest speakers shared case studies and other tools.