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Appendixes

Appendix 1: Committees, memberships and attendance at meetings

Authority meetings

At 30 June 2019, the Authority comprised the Chair, Nerida O’Loughlin; Deputy Chair and CEO, Creina Chapman; three full-time members, Fiona Cameron, James Cameron and Chris Jose; and three associate members, Anita Jacoby, Delia Rickard and Cristina Cifuentes.
The Authority met 38 times in 2018–19.

Table A.1: Attendance by members at Authority meetings, 2018–19

Authority Member

No. of meetings attended

Nerida O’Loughlin

38

Creina Chapman

36

James Cameron

34

Chris Jose

35

Fiona Cameron

34

Anita Jacoby

16

Delia Rickard*

2

Cristina Cifuentes (part-time)

1

Rosemary Sinclair (part-time)

2

* Delia Rickard was appointed on 4 April 2019.

Rosemary Sinclair’s term of appointment finished on 4 August 2018.

For more details about the Authority, refer to the ‘Overview—The Authority’ section of this report.

Executive Management Committee meetings

The ACMA Executive Management Committee (EMC) functions as a committee for management decisions. The EMC assists the Chair by providing advice on issues of corporate or strategic significance to the agency.

At 30 June 2019, the EMC comprised the Chair, Deputy Chair and CEO, and general managers.

The EMC met 24 times in 2018–19.

Table A.2: Attendance at Executive Management Committee meetings, 1 July 2018–30 June 2019

Member of Executive Management Committee

No. of meetings attended

Nerida O’Loughlin, Chair

21

Creina Chapman, Deputy Chair and CEO

20

Giles Tanner, General Manager, Communications Infrastructure Division*

11

Helen Owens, General Manager, Corporate and Research Division

22

Brendan Byrne, General Manager, Legal Services Division

24

Jennifer McNeill, General Manager, Content, Consumer and Citizen Division

9

Jonquil Ritter, Acting General Manager, Content, Consumer and Citizen Division

10

Linda Caruso, General Manager, Communications Infrastructure Division§

12

* Giles Tanner retired from the ACMA in November 2018.

Jennifer McNeill was seconded to the Department of Communications and the Arts in January 2019.

Jonquil Ritter began Acting General Manager, Content, Consumer and Citizen Division in January 2019.

§ Linda Caruso began Acting General Manager, Communications Infrastructure Division in December 2018 and was confirmed in the position in March 2019.

Audit and Risk Committee

The ACMA Audit and Risk Committee coordinates internal and external audit activities and oversees the financial statements, risk management framework and implementation of fraud control policies.

In its capacity as an advisory committee to the ACMA Chair, the Audit and Risk Committee met five times in 2018–19.

Internal Audit and Risk Committee members provide insight to the ACMA’s business operations. Internal members are appointed for a two-year term.

Table A.3: Attendance at Audit and Risk Committee meetings, 2018–19

Member of Audit and Risk Committee

No. of meetings attended

Ian McPhee AO PSM, Audit and Risk Committee Chair, external member

5

Fay Holthuyzen, External Audit and Risk Committee Member

5

Michael Parkinson, External Audit and Risk Committee Member

5

Jeremy Chandler, External Audit and Risk Committee Member

5

Paul Miszalski, ACMA Audit and Risk Committee Member (until March 2019)

3

Patrick Belton, ACMA Audit and Risk Committee Member
(from March 2019)

2

Allan Major, ACMA Audit and Risk Committee Member

5

ACMA advisory and consultative bodies

Consumer Consultative Forum (CCF)

Chair

Fiona Cameron, Authority Member, Australian Communications and Media Authority

Consumer representatives

New consumer organisation representatives were appointed in September 2018 for a term of three years. Consumer organisation representatives included:

  • Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN)
  • Consumer Policy Research Centre
  • Country Women’s Association
  • Deaf Australia
  • Federation of Ethnic Communities’ Council of Australia
  • Legal Aid NSW
  • NSW Business Chamber
  • South Australian Council of Social Services
  • Westjustice

Previous consumer representatives’ terms expired on 30 June 2018, with the exception of ACCAN, which is an ongoing consumer representative.

Representatives from industry bodies:

  • Chris Althaus, CEO, Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association
  • John Stanton, CEO, Communications Alliance

Regulatory and government representatives:

  • Delia Rickard PSM, Deputy Chair, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission
  • Judi Jones, Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman
  • Jason Ashurst, Assistant Secretary, Consumer Broadband Services, Department of Communications and the Arts

Emergency Call Services Advisory Committee (ECSAC)

ECSAC was a formally constituted advisory committee, established in 2006, to advise the ACMA on matters related to the emergency call service. Following a review of the national Triple Zero operator service, DoCA recommended that the ECSAC be dissolved and replaced by the Triple Zero Coordination Committee. ECSAC was suspended in late 2017, ahead of the establishment of the Triple Zero Coordination Committee in early 2018. ECSAC was formally dissolved on 2 August 2019.

Numbering Advisory Committee (NAC)

  • AAPT Ltd
  • Australian Communications and Media Authority
  • Australian Communications Consumer Action Network
  • Australian Competition and Consumer Commission
  • Australian Phone Word Association Ltd
  • Mr Lawrence Glen Clarke
  • Communications Alliance
  • Department of Communications and the Arts
  • MyNetFone Ltd
  • SingTel Optus Pty Ltd
  • Telstra Corporation Ltd
  • Vodafone Hutchison Australia Pty Ltd.

Digital Radio Planning Committee

  • Australian Communications and Media Authority (Chair)
  • Australian Broadcasting Corporation
  • Australian Competition and Consumer Commission
  • Commercial Radio Australia
  • Community Broadcasting Association of Australia
  • Department of Communications and the Arts
  • Special Broadcasting Service.

Appendix 2: Staffing information

Appendix 2 contains staffing details for the ACMA and eSafety. Other than the Commissioner, all employees working for eSafety remain employed by the ACMA under the Public Service Act.

Table A.4: All ongoing employees—current report period (2018–19)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

NSW

39

3

42

67

17

84

-

-

-

126

Qld

7

-

7

1

2

3

-

-

-

10

SA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Tas.

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Vic.

70

1

71

55

28

83

-

-

-

154

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ACT

58

3

61

56

12

68

-

-

-

129

NT

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Overseas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

175

7

182

179

59

238

-

-

-

420

Table A.5: All non-ongoing employees—current report period (2018–19)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

NSW

1

-

1

3

2

5

-

-

-

6

Qld

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

SA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Tas.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Vic.

5

1

6

3

1

4

-

-

-

10

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ACT

5

-

5

3

1

4

-

-

-

9

NT

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Overseas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

12

1

13

9

4

13

-

-

-

26

Table A.6: All ongoing employees—previous report period (2017–18)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

NSW

39

-

39

64

16

80

-

-

-

119

Qld

7

-

7

2

1

3

-

-

-

10

SA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Tas.

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Vic.

69

1

70

44

30

74

-

-

-

144

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ACT

63

2

65

54

6

60

-

-

-

125

NT

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Overseas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

179

3

182

164

53

217

-

-

-

399

Table A.7: All non-ongoing employees—previous report period (2017–18)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

NSW

1

-

1

10

1

11

-

-

-

12

Qld

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

SA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Tas.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Vic.

5

-

5

11

3

14

-

-

-

19

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ACT

3

-

3

3

2

5

-

-

-

8

NT

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Overseas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

10

-

10

24

6

30

-

-

-

40

Australian Public Sector (APS) classification and gender

Table A.8: Australian Public Service Act ongoing employees—current report period (2018–19)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

SES 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SES 2

1

-

1

3

-

3

-

-

-

4

SES 1

6

-

6

3

-

3

-

-

-

9

EL 2

28

-

28

30

4

34

-

-

-

62

EL 1

67

6

73

60

27

87

-

-

-

160

APS 6

47

1

48

50

21

71

-

-

-

119

APS 5

18

-

18

15

3

18

-

-

-

36

APS 4

6

-

6

13

3

16

-

-

-

22

APS 3

-

-

-

1

1

2

-

-

-

2

APS 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

APS 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other[1]

2

-

2

4

-

4

-

-

-

6

Total

175

7

182

179

59

238

-

-

-

420

[1] In this table and the tables following, the only staff included in the ‘Other’ category are ACMA graduates.

Table A.9: Australian Public Service Act non-ongoing employees—current report period (2018–19)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

SES 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SES 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SES 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

EL 2

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

1

EL 1

3

-

3

1

2

3

-

-

-

6

APS 6

7

1

8

5

1

6

-

-

-

14

APS 5

1

-

1

-

1

1

-

-

-

2

APS 4

1

-

1

2

-

2

-

-

-

3

APS 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

APS 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

APS 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

12

1

13

9

4

13

-

-

-

26

Table A.10: Australian Public Service Act ongoing employees—previous report period (2017–18)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total Indeterminate

SES 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SES 2

3

-

3

1

-

1

-

-

-

4

SES 1

6

-

6

5

-

5

-

-

-

11

EL 2

28

-

28

24

2

26

-

-

-

54

EL 1

70

3

73

54

27

81

-

-

-

154

APS 6

49

-

49

49

18

67

-

-

-

116

APS 5

18

-

18

9

3

12

-

-

-

30

APS 4

3

-

3

22

2

24

-

-

-

27

APS 3

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

APS 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

APS 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other

2

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

Total

179

3

182

164

53

217

-

-

-

399

Table A.11: Australian Public Service Act non-ongoing employees—previous report period (2017–18)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total male

Full-time

Part-time

Total female

Full-time

Part-time

Total indeterminate

SES 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SES 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SES 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

EL 2

2

-

2

1

-

1

-

-

-

3

EL 1

3

-

3

6

2

8

-

-

-

11

APS 6

5

-

5

12

2

14

-

-

-

19

APS 5

-

-

-

2

1

3

-

-

-

3

APS 4

-

-

-

3

1

4

-

-

-

4

APS 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

APS 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

APS 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

10

-

10

24

6

30

-

-

-

40

Employment type by full-time and part-time status

Table A.12: Australian Public Service Act employees by full-time and part-time status—current report period (2018–19)

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total ongoing

Full-time

Part-time

Total non-ongoing

SES 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SES 2

4

-

4

-

-

-

4

SES 1

9

-

9

-

-

-

9

EL 2

58

4

62

1

-

1

63

EL 1

127

33

160

4

2

6

166

APS 6

97

22

119

12

2

14

133

APS 5

33

3

36

1

1

2

38

APS 4

19

3

22

3

-

3

25

APS 3

1

1

2

-

-

-

2

APS 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

APS 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other

6

-

6

-

-

-

6

Total

354

66

420

21

5

26

446

Table A.13: Australian Public Service Act Employees by full-time and part-time status—previous report period (2017–18)

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total ongoing

Full-time

Part-time

Total non-ongoing

SES 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SES 2

4

-

4

-

-

-

4

SES 1

11

-

11

-

-

-

11

EL 2

52

2

54

3

-

3

57

EL 1

124

30

154

9

2

11

165

APS 6

98

18

116

17

2

19

135

APS 5

27

3

30

2

1

3

33

APS 4

25

2

27

3

1

4

31

APS 3

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

APS 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

APS 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other

2

-

2

-

-

-

2

Total

343

56

399

34

6

40

439

Table A.14: Australian Public Service Act employment type by location—current reporting period (2018–19)

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

NSW

129

6

135

Qld

10

1

11

SA

-

-

-

Tas.

1

-

1

Vic.

154

10

164

WA

-

-

-

ACT

126

9

135

NT

-

-

-

Overseas

-

-

-

Total

420

26

446

Table A.15: Australian Public Service Act employment type by location—previous report period (2017—18)

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

NSW

145

19

164

Qld

10

1

11

SA

-

-

-

Tas.

1

-

1

Vic.

118

12

130

WA

-

-

-

ACT

125

8

133

NT

-

-

-

Overseas

-

-

-

Total

399

40

439

Table A.16: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous employment—current report period (2018–19)

Total

Ongoing

3

Non-ongoing

-

Total

3

Table A.17: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous employment—previous report period (2017–18)

Total

Ongoing

5

Non-ongoing

-

Total

5

Arrangements of SES and non-SES employees

Table A.18: Australian Public Service Act employment arrangements—current report period (2018–19)

SES

Non-SES

Total

ACMA Enterprise Agreement 2017–2020

-

413

413

Individual flexibility arrangement

-

20

20

Section 24(1) Determination

13

-

13

Total

13

433

446

Salary ranges by classification level

Table A.19: Australian Public Service Act Employment salary ranges by classification level (minimum/maximum)—current report period (2018–19)

Minimum salary ($)

Maximum salary ($)

SES 3

-

-

SES 2

277,153

284,653

SES 1

209,382

224,413

EL 2

120,283

145,631

EL 1

99,425

112,122

APS 6

81,826

85,918

APS 5

74,241

80,159

APS 4

66,629

72,425

APS 3

59,488

64,691

APS 2

52,347

57,743

APS 1

46,588

51,321

Other

-

-

Total

46,588

284,653

Appendix 3: Executive remuneration

Table A.20: Information about remuneration for Key Management Personnel

Short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits

Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total remuneration

Name

Position title

Base salary

Bonuses

Other benefits and allowances

Superannuation contributions

Long service leave

Other long-term benefits

Nerida O’Loughlin

Chair

490,948

-

-

70,544

12,077

-

-

573,569

Creina Chapman

Deputy Chair

375,438

-

7,738

55,303

9,506

-

-

447,986

Julie Inman Grant

eSafety Commissioner

335,302

-

-

33,464

7,963

-

-

376,728

Linda Caruso

General Manager

146,864

-

26,398

23,783

6,171

-

-

203,216

Jonquil Ritter

General Manager

116,074

-

33,438

21,954

6,171

-

-

177,637

Helen Owens

General Manager

213,820

-

53,254

39,515

6,612

-

-

313,201

Brendan Byrne

General Manager

252,849

-

26,322

40,650

6,171

-

-

325,992

Damian West

Former General Manager

5,552

-

540

-

76

-

-

6,169

Giles Tanner

Former General Manager

109,226

-

10,615

20,542

2,645

-

-

143,028

Jennifer McNeil

General Manager

139,964

-

16,548

25,558

6,171

-

-

188,241

Notes to Table A.20

Table A.20 includes officers in a substantive Key Management Personnel (KMP) role for any period during the financial year and officers acting in KMP roles for periods greater than three months. For these officers, the reported amounts reflect remuneration during these periods only.

Base salary includes:

  • wages
  • accrual of recreational leave entitlements.

Other benefits and allowances include:

  • motor vehicle allowances
  • allowances for higher duties
  • other allowances under the relevant staff agreements.

Long service leave includes the accrual of entitlements.

For Statutory Office Holders, the total remuneration reported in Table A.20 includes elements outside the Remuneration Tribunal determination, such as the accrual of recreational and long service leave.

Table A.21: Information about remuneration for key management personnel

Short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits

Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total remuneration

Total remuneration bands

Number of senior executives

Average base salary

Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average superannuation contributions

Average long service leave

Average other long-term benefits

Average termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$0–$220,000

12

77,158

429

16,674

12,717

3,670

-

9,352

119,999

$220,001–$245,000

3

174,245

-

20,137

34,180

5,528

-

-

234,090

$245,001–$270,000

1

177,367

-

26,622

36,771

5,591

-

-

246,350

$270,001–$295,000

3

189,117

-

21,047

34,547

4,849

-

33,740

283,300

Notes to Table A.21

Table A.21 includes officers in a substantive SES role for any period during the financial year and officers acting in SES roles for periods greater than three months. For these officers, the reported amounts reflect remuneration during these periods only.

Base salary includes:

  • wages
  • accrual of recreational leave entitlements.

ACMA SES officers are not paid bonuses. The average bonus in the table above reflects a bonus paid to an EL2 officer while they were acting in an SES role in 2018–19. This bonus related to 2017–18 performance when this officer was a substantive EL2.

Other benefits and allowances includes:

  • motor vehicle allowances
  • allowances for higher duties
  • other allowances under the relevant staff agreements.

Long service leave includes the accrual of entitlements.

Appendix 4: Programs and content

The ACMA assess applications for the classification of children’s (C) and preschool (P) programs. Appendix 4 lists the children’s and preschool programs granted classifications.

Table A.22: Programs granted children’s or preschool classification, 2018–19

Program title

Style

Type

Origin

Applicant

Children's—C

Gamify (series 1, episodes 1–100)

Live action

Light entertainment—game show

Australia

Network Ten Pty Ltd

Get Arty (series 3, episodes 1–60)

Live action

Information

Australia

Seven Network (Operations) Limited

Get Clever (series 2, episodes 1–60)

Live action

Information

Australia

Seven Network (Operations) Limited

News of the Wild (series 1, episodes 101–137)

Live action

Light entertainment— magazine

Australia

Northern Pictures Pty Ltd

News of the Wild (series 2, episodes 1–71)

Live action

Light entertainment— magazine

Australia

Northern Pictures Pty Ltd

Scope (series 5, episodes 1–100)

Live action

Information— magazine

Australia

Network Ten Pty Ltd

Smashdown (series 1, episodes 1–150)

Live action

Light entertainment— game show

Australia

Nine Entertainment Co. Pty Ltd

Totally Wild (series 26, episodes 1–180)

Live action

Light entertainment— magazine

Australia

Network Ten Pty Ltd

ZooMoo (series 3, episodes 1–35)

Live action/ animation/ puppetry

Light entertainment— variety

New Zealand

Natural History New Zealand Ltd

Provisional—PRC

Cosmo Kids (series 1, episodes 1–13)

Animation

Drama

Australia

Galloping Films Pty Ltd

Space Nova (series 1, episodes 1–26)

Animation

Drama

Australia

SLR Productions Pty Ltd

Preschool—P

The Fo-Fo Figgily Show (series 1, episodes 1–25)

Live action/ animation/ puppetry

Variety

Australia

F3 Productions (Australia) Pty Ltd

Preschool—P—Renewal

Pipsqueaks (series 1, episodes 1–45)

Live action/puppetry

Variety

Australia

Beyond Entertainment Pty Limited

Surprises (series 1, episodes 1–30)

Live action

Variety

Australia

Ambience Entertainment Pty Limited

Surprises (series 2, episodes 1–45)

Live action

Variety

Australia

Ambience Entertainment Pty Limited

Australian children’s drama—CD

Drop Dead Weird (series 2, episodes 1–26

Live Action

Drama

Australia

Ambience Entertainment Pty Limited

Dumbotz (series 1, episodes 1–52)

Animation

Drama

Australia

Beyond Entertainment Pty Limited

Kitty is not a Cat (series 2, episodes 1–52)

Animation

Drama

Australia

Bogan Entertainment Solutions Pty Ltd

Maya the Bee: The Honey Games (Telemovie)

Animation

Drama

Australia

Studio B Animation Pty Ltd

Quimbo's Quest (series 1, episodes 1–26)

Animation

Drama

New Zealand

Quimbo's Quest Ltd

Random & Whacky

(series 2, episodes 1–60)

Live action

Drama

Australia

Ambience Entertainment Pty Limited

Space Chickens in Space

(series 1, episodes 1–52)

Animation

Drama

Australia

Brain Bender Pty Ltd

Table A.23: Children’s television consultants, 2018–19

Name

Expertise

Donna Andrews

Child development/production

Dina Browne

Production

Stephen Measday

Editing/scriptwriting

Rita Princi

Child development

Gina Roncoli

Production/scriptwriting

Appendix 5: Broadcasting investigations outcomes

The ACMA investigates broadcasters’ compliance with codes of practice, licence conditions and standards related to the BSA. Appendix 5 details investigation findings by category of broadcasting service.

Table A.24: ACMA investigations, 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019

Investigation number

Station

Program or issue

Substance of complaint/matter

Outcome

Commercial television

Breach findings: 8

BI-363

Seven/Channel Seven Sydney Pty Limited

Sunrise

Accuracy and serious contempt on the basis of race in a segment about the adoption of Indigenous children and child abuse in Indigenous communities

Breach of clause 3.3.1 [accuracy] and clause 2.6.2 [intense dislike, serious contempt or severe ridicule on the basis of race]; no breach of clause 3.2.1 [material which may cause distress] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015.

BI-409

Seven/Channel Seven Brisbane Pty Limited

American Dad!

Classification—program was inappropriate for the time of broadcast

Breach of clause 2.1.1 [classification] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised in 2018).

BI-410

Seven/Channel Seven Brisbane Pty Limited

American Dad!

Classification—program was inappropriate for the time of broadcast

Breach of clause 2.1.1 [classification] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised in 2018).

BI-420*

Ten/Network Ten (Brisbane) Pty Ltd

Have You Been Paying Attention?

Captioning—quality of captioning service

Breach of subsection 130ZR(1) [basic rule about captioning]; subsection 130ZZA(4) [compliance with Captioning Quality Standard] and paragraph 7(1)(o) of Schedule 2 (licence condition) of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

BI-421*

WIN Ten/Network Investments Pty Ltd

Have You Been Paying Attention?

Captioning—quality of captioning service

Breach of subsection 130ZR(1) [basic rule about captioning]; subsection 130ZZA(4) [compliance with Captioning Quality Standard] and paragraph 7(1)(o) of Schedule 2 (licence condition) of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

BI-432

Seven/Channel Seven Melbourne Pty Ltd

Sunday Night

Accuracy and material not suitable for broadcast—in a segment titled African Gangs

Breach of clause 3.3.1 [accuracy] and no breach of clause 2.6.2 [material not suitable for broadcast] and of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-433

WIN/Network Investments Pty Ltd

Ten Eyewitness News First at Five

Exercise care in selecting material for broadcast and material which may cause distress—in a news report about a bashing

Breach of clause 2.3.3 [exercise care in selecting material for broadcast] and clause 3.2.1 (a) [material which may cause distress] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-434

Seven/Channel Seven Melbourne Pty Ltd

Seven News and Sunday Night

Privacy—in two separate broadcasts focusing on bullying in schools and cyberbullying

Breach of section 3.5 [privacy] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

No breach findings: 18*

BI-405

Seven/Channel Seven Melbourne Pty Ltd

Seven News

Misrepresentation of viewpoints and impartiality—in a news report on the findings of an Ombudsman investigation

No breach of clause 3.3.1 [misrepresentation of viewpoints] and 3.4.1 [impartiality] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015

BI-406

Nine/Queensland Television Ltd

Program promotion for Love Island Australia

Classification and scheduling—program promotion for an MA15+ classified reality television program

No breach of clause 2.1.1 [classification] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-414^

Ten/Network Ten (Melbourne) Pty Limited

MasterChef Australia

Captioning—no captions provided on a program broadcast between 6 am and midnight on commercial television primary channel

Breach of subsection 130ZR(1) [basic rule] of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 disregarded as subsection 130ZUB(1) [disregarding breaches caused by significant, unforeseen technical difficulties] is applicable; no breach of paragraph 7(1)(o) [comply with Part 9D] of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

BI-425

9Gem/Swan Television & Radio Broadcasters Pty Ltd

Non-program matter

Hourly limits—advertising on a commercial television multi-channel

No breach of clause 5.4.2 [hourly limits – multi channels] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-429

Nine/TCN Channel Nine Pty Ltd

Non-program matter

Audio levels and loudness—advertising on a commercial television channel

No breach of clause 5.7.2 [audio levels and loudness] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015

BI-431

Seven/Channel Seven Queensland Pty Limited

Seven News

Cause distress and complaint handling—in a news report about the Dreamworld tragedy

No breach of clause 3.2.1 [material which may cause distress] or clause 7.3.1 [respond to complaint within 30 working days] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-440^

Seven/Channel Seven Queensland Pty Ltd

Sunrise, The Morning Show, Morning News, The Daily Edition, Seven News at 4pm, 6pm Townsville News, 6:30pm replay of the 6pm Brisbane News and Weekend Sunrise.

Captioning—no captions provided on a program broadcast between 6 am and midnight on commercial television primary channel

Breach of subsection 130ZR(1) [basic rule] of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 disregarded as subsection 130ZUB[1) [disregarding breaches caused by significant, unforeseen technical difficulties] is applicable; no breach of paragraph 7(1)(o) [licence condition to comply with Part 9D] of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

BI-443

Seven/Channel Seven Adelaide Pty Limited

Commercial for cinema film Venom

Classification—of a commercial for an M classified film

The licensee’s non-compliance with clause 2.1.1 [classification] falls within the exception in clause 1.1.4(b) of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-444

Prime 7/Prime Television (Southern) Pty Limited

Commercials for the cinema films Halloween and Hunter Killer

Classification and special care requirements for non-program material—commercials for MA15+ classified cinema films

Halloween commercial: The licensee’s non-compliance with clause 2.1.1 [classification] and 2.4.1 [special care requirements for non-program material] falls within the exception in clause 1.1.4(b) of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

Hunter Killer commercial: No breach of clause 2.1.1 [classification] and no breach clause 2.4.1 [special care requirements for non-program material] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-445^

Seven/Channel Seven Sydney Pty Limited

Home and Away

Captioning—no captions provided on a program broadcast between 6 am and midnight on a commercial television primary channel

Breach of subsection 130ZR(1) [basic rule regarding captioning] of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 disregarded as subsection 130ZUB(1) [disregarding breaches caused by significant, unforeseen technical difficulties] is applicable; no breach of paragraph 7(1)(o) [licence condition to comply with Part 9D] of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992.

BI-448

Nine/Queensland Television Ltd

Nine News

Privacy—in a news report about an armed robbery

No breach of clause 3.5.1 [privacy] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-456

Seven/
Channel Seven Melbourne Pty Ltd

Seven News

Accuracy and impartiality—in two news reports about a court case

No breach of clause 3.3.1 [present material facts accurately] and clause 3.4.1 [present news fairly and impartially] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-457^

One/Network Ten (Melbourne) Pty Ltd

Japanese Formula One Grand Prix

Tobacco advertising

No breach of paragraph 7(1)(a) [tobacco advertising] of Schedule to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

BI-461

Seven/Channel Seven Sydney Pty Limited

Sunrise

Material not suitable for broadcast and accuracy—in a news report about Australia’s immigration quotas

No breach of clauses 2.6.2 [material not suitable for broadcast] or clause 3.3.1 [present material fact accurately] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised 2018)

BI-462

Ten/Network Ten (Sydney) Pty Limited

Territory Cops

Classification and material not suitable for broadcast—in a reality program about police in the Northern Territory

No breach of clause 2.1.1 [classification] and clause 2.6.2 [material not suitable for broadcast] of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice 2015 (revised in 2018)

BI-472^

NBN/NBN Pty Ltd

Election advertisements for candidates in the NSW state election

Political matter— broadcast of the correct required particulars

No breach of subclause 4(2) [identification of certain political matter] and paragraph 7(1)(j) [comply with subclause 4(2)] of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

BI-482^

Seven/Channel Seven Sydney Pty Limited

My Kitchen Rules and Instant Hotel

Captioning—no captions provided on a program broadcast between 6 am and midnight on commercial television primary channel

Breach of subsection 130ZR(1) of Part 9D of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [captioning programs between 6 am and midnight on free-to-air primary television channels] to be disregarded as subsection 130UB(1) [disregarding breaches caused by significant, unforeseen technical difficulties] is applicable

BI-493^

Channel Seven Adelaide Pty Limited

AFL: Collingwood v Geelong

Captioning—no captions provided on a program broadcast between 6 am and midnight on commercial television primary channel

Breach of subsection 130ZR(1) of Part 9D of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [captioning programs between 6 am and midnight on free-to-air primary television channels] to be disregarded as subsection 130UB(1) [disregarding breaches caused by significant, unforeseen technical difficulties] is applicable

* Five of these investigations were captioning ‘disregarded breaches’ under subsection 130ZUB(1) of the BSA, which are those caused by significant, unforeseen technical difficulties.

^ Investigation against a licence condition, standard or provision of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992.

Completed, no finding: 6

BI-476

Prime Television (Southern) Pty Limited

For each licensee, multiple broadcasts between 15-17 March 2019

An ACMA own motion investigation into the perpetrator filmed footage of the Christchurch terrorist attack 15 March 2019

This investigation was completed without a finding being made. The ACMA’s consideration of the material broadcast formed part of a consolidated report that examined coverage of the Christchurch incident across Australian broadcast television platforms.

A consolidated report on the outcome was published in July 2019.

BI-477

WIN Television NSW Pty Limited

BI-478

Network Ten (Sydney) Pty Limited

BI-479

TCN Channel Nine Pty Limited

BI-480

Channel Seven Sydney Pty Limited

BI-481

Southern Cross Television (Tnt9) Pty Limited

ABC Television

Breach findings: 2

BI-442

ABC/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Catalyst (Feeding Australia: Foods of Tomorrow)

Accuracy and due impartiality—in a program about sustainable farming

Breach of standard 4.1 [due impartiality] and no breach of standard 2.1 [accuracy] or standard 2.2 [do not materially mislead] of the ABC Code of Practice 2011 (revised in 2016)

BI-446^

ABC/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Joanna Lumley’s Silk Road Adventure

Captioning—no captions provided on a program broadcast between 6 am and midnight on national broadcaster primary channel

Breach of subsection 130ZR(1) [basic rule] of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

No breach findings: 5

BI-402

ABC Comedy/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Tonightly with Tom Ballard

Fair and honest dealing and harm and offence—in a comedy sketch about a political candidate

No breach of standard 5.1 [inform participants], standard 5.2 [refusal to participate], standard 7.1 [harm and offence must be justified] or standard 7.3 [appropriate classification] of the ABC Code of Practice 2011 (revised in 2016)

BI-407

ABC/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Four Corners

Accuracy, corrections and clarifications, impartiality—in a report about Australians responding to climate change

No breach of standard 2.1 [accuracy], standard 2.2 [do not materially mislead] standard 3.1 [corrections and clarifications] or standard 4.1 [due impartiality] of the ABC Code of Practice 2011 (revised in 2016)

BI-411

ABC/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

ABC News

Accuracy and due impartiality—in a news report about the reintroduction of a school reading program

No breach of standard 2.1 [accuracy], standard 2.2 [do not materially mislead] or standard 4.1 [due impartiality] of the ABC Code of Practice 2011 (revised in 2016)

BI-428

ABC/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

7.30

Accuracy and impartiality—in an interview with the president of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU)

No breach of standard 2.1 [accuracy], standard 2.2 [do not materially mislead] or standard 4.1 [due impartiality] of the ABC Code of Practice 2011 (revised in 2016)

BI-451

ABC/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Insiders

Harm and offence—in a segment discussing a proposed bill on religious freedoms

No breach of standard 7.1 [harm and offence] or standard 7.7 [condone or encourage prejudice] of the ABC Code of Practice 2011 (revised in 2016)

Completed, no finding: 1

BI-475

ABC/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Multiple broadcasts between 15-17 March 2019

An ACMA own motion investigation into the perpetrator filmed footage of the Christchurch terrorist attack 15 March 2019

This investigation was completed without a finding being made. The ACMA’s consideration of the material broadcast formed part of a consolidated report that examined coverage of the Christchurch incident across Australian broadcast television platforms.

SBS television

Completed, no finding: 1

BI-474

SBS/Special Broadcasting Services

Multiple broadcasts between 15-17 March 2019

An ACMA own motion investigation into the perpetrator filmed footage of the Christchurch terrorist attack 15 March 2019

This investigation was completed without a finding being made. The ACMA’s consideration of the material broadcast formed part of a consolidated report that examined coverage of the Christchurch incident across Australian broadcast television platforms.

Subscription television

No breach findings: 2

BI-430

Sky New Live/Foxtel Cable Television Pty Limited

The Adam Giles Show

Provoke intense dislike, serious contempt on the grounds of national or ethnic origin or race, or religion—in a studio interview.

No breach of subclause 2.1(a) [provoke intense dislike, serious contempt on the grounds of national or ethnic origin or race, or religion] of the Subscription Broadcast Television Codes of Practice 2013 (revised in 2018)

BI-458^

Fox Sports/Foxtel Cable Television Pty Ltd

Japanese Formula One Grand Prix

Tobacco advertising

No breach of paragraph 10(1)(a) [tobacco advertising] of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

^ Investigation against a licence condition, standard or provision of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

Completed, no finding: 2

BI-473

Foxtel Cable Television Pty Limited

Multiple broadcasts between 15-17 March 2019 on Sky News Live

An ACMA own motion investigation into the perpetrator filmed footage of the Christchurch terrorist attack 15 March 2019

This investigation was completed without a finding being made. The ACMA’s consideration of the material broadcast formed part of a consolidated report that examined coverage of the Christchurch incident across Australian broadcast television platforms.

BI-497

Foxtel Cable Television Pty Limited

Multiple broadcasts between 15-17 March 2019 on TRT World

Open narrowcasting television

Breach findings: 1

BI-418

West TV/West TV Limited

RT World News

Accuracy and fairness and complaints handling—in an international news program

Breach of code 2.4 [respond to complaints within 60 days]; no finding on code 2.1 [accuracy and fairness] of the ASTRA Open Narrowcast Television Codes of Practice 2009

Commercial radio

Breach findings: 1

BI-441

2GB/Harbour Radio Pty Ltd

The Alan Jones Breakfast Show

Decency, and incite hatred against or serious contempt for because of race—in a discussion about the Liberal Party leadership spill.

Breach of 2.2 [decency] and no breach of 2.1.4 [incite hatred against or serious contempt for because of race] of the Commercial Radio Code of Practice 2017 (revised in 2018)

No breach findings: 1

BI-427

Triple M/Triple M Melbourne Pty Ltd

Holiday song by Green day

Decency—in relation to the song lyric ‘sieg heil’.

No breach of 2.2 [decency] of the Commercial Radio Code of Practice 2017 (revised in 2018)

ABC radio

No breach findings: 1

BI-426

ABC/Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Talkfest

Impartiality—in a radio broadcast discussing Australia’s population

No breach of standard 4.2 [diversity of perspectives] and standard 4.5 [unduly favour one perspective] of the ABC Code of Practice 2011 (revised in 2016)

Community radio

Breach findings: 12

BI-359^

Bayside Community Radio Association Inc

Licence condition matter

Code matter

Complaint about a community broadcaster operating the service as part of a profit-making enterprise and that the licensee broadcast material that caused distress and which did not meet community standards

Breach of subclause 9(2)(c)(ii) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [community participation in the selection of programs]

No breach of subclause 9(2)(e) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [operating the service as part of a profit-making enterprise]

No breach of clause 3.2 of the Community Radio Broadcasting Codes of Practice 2008 [potential for distress, meeting prevailing community standards]

BI-416^

The University of Newcastle

Licence condition matter

Complaint that during the programs Morning and Sunday Sunrise the licensee exceeded the time limit for sponsorship announcements

Breach of paragraph 9(3)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not exceed five minutes per hour of sponsorship announcements]

BI-417^

The University of Newcastle

Licence condition matter

Complaint that during the programs Morning and Sunday Sunrise the licensee exceeded the time limit for sponsorship announcements

Breach of paragraph 9(3)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not exceed five minutes per hour of sponsorship announcements]

BI-422^

Sunraysia Community Radio Association Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint that a community broadcaster was not encouraging community participation in the selection of programs

Breach of subclause 9(2)(c)(ii) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [community participation in the selection of programs]

BI-437^

Port Stephens FM Radio Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint that a community broadcaster was not encouraging community participation in the selection of programs

Breach of subclause 9(2)(c)(ii) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [community participation in the selection of programs]

BI-438^

Tasman Community Broadcasters Association Inc

Licence condition matter

Code matter

Complaint that a community broadcaster did not encourage participation in the operation of its service and did not have all of the policies required by the Community Broadcasting Codes of Practice 2008

Breach of clause 2.1 of the Community Broadcasting Codes of Practice 2008 [community participation policy]

Breach of clause 6.1 of the Community Broadcasting Codes of Practice 2008 [sponsorship policy]

No breach of subclause 9(2)(c)(i) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [encourage community participation in the operations of the service]

BI-447^

Yarra Valley FM Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community broadcaster providing of political matter without required particulars and broadcast of election material during blackout period.

Complaint about a community licensee broadcasting advertisements and exceeding the sponsorship limit

Breach of subclause 4(2) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [licensee must announce required particulars]

Breach of subclause 3A(2) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [licensee must not broadcast election advertisements during the blackout period]

No breach of breach of subclause 9(1)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not broadcast advertisements]

No breach of subclause 9(3)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not exceed five minutes per hour of sponsorship announcements]

BI-452^

Tweed Coast Community Radio Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community broadcaster not providing the service for community purposes.

Breach of subclause 9(2)(d) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [providing the service for community purposes]

BI-453^

Peedac Pty Ltd

Licence condition matter

Complaint that a community broadcaster was not encouraging participation in the operations of the service

Breach of subclause 9(2)(c)(i) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [encourage community participation in the operations of the service]

BI-455^

Port Stephens FM Radio Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community licensee broadcasting advertisements and exceeding the sponsorship limit

Breach of subclause 9(1)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not broadcast advertisements]

No breach of subclause 9(3)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not exceed five minutes per hour of sponsorship announcements]

BI-459^

Tatiara Community FM Broadcasters Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community licensee broadcasting advertisement

Breach of subclause 9(1)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not broadcast advertisements]

BI-463^

Yarra Valley FM Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community licensee exceeding the sponsorship limit

Breach of subclause 9(3)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not exceed five minutes per hour of sponsorship announcements]

^ Investigation against a licence condition, standard or provision of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

No breach findings: 4

BI-436^

Sunshine FM Radio Association Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community licensee exceeding the sponsorship limit

No breach of subclause 9(3)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [will not exceed 5 minutes per hour of sponsorship announcements]

BI-449^

Clarence Valley Christian Broadcasters Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community broadcaster not representing the community interest, not encouraging participation in the operations of the service and not providing the service for community purposes

No breach of subclause 9(2)(b) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [representing community interest]

No breach of subclause 9(2)(c)(i) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [encourage community participation in the operations of the service]

No breach of subclause 9(2)(d) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [providing the service for community purposes]

BI-470^

Memphis Mayhem FM Radio Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community broadcaster not providing the service for community purposes

No breach subclause 9(2)(d) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [providing the service for community purposes]

BI-490^

Fresh Broadcasters Inc

Licence condition matter

Complaint about a community licensee broadcasting a tobacco advertisement

No breach subclause 9(1)(a) of Schedule 2 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 [licensee will not broadcast a tobacco advertisement]

^Investigation against a licence condition, standard or provision of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992.

Open narrowcasting radio

No breach findings: 2

BI-412^

Air FM/Futrends Pty Ltd

General programming

Categories of broadcasting service—providing programs of broad appeal on a narrowcasting service

No breach of section 18 [definition of narrowcasting services] and section 133 [providing a commercial radio service without a licence] of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

BI-413^

Vintage FM/W & A Willmington Pty Ltd

General programming

Categories of broadcasting service—providing programs of broad appeal on a narrowcasting service

No breach of section 18 [definition of narrowcasting services] and section 133 [providing a commercial radio service without a licence] of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992

^Investigation against a licence condition, standard or provision of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992.

null

Appendix 6: Telecommunications consumer protection compliance and enforcement outcomes

Table A.25 includes information related to the ACMA’s requirement under paragraphs 57(d)
and 57(e) of the ACMA Act to report on Part 6 of the Telecommunications Act.

Table A.25: ACMA formal warnings, directions and infringement notices, 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019

Entity

Regulation

Subject matter

Outcome

Air Networks Pty Ltd

Telecommunications (Consumer Protection and Service Standards) Act 1999 (TCPSS Act)

Section 128: Failure to join the TIO scheme

Remedial direction

Moove Mobile Pty Ltd

TCPSS Act

Section 128: Failure to join the TIO scheme

Remedial direction

Telstra Corporation Limited

Carrier Licence Conditions (Telstra Corporation Limited) Declaration 1997

Paragraph 19(2)(b): Failure to implement arrangements for maximising service continuity to priority assistance customers.

Remedial direction

Telstra Corporation Limited

C628:2015 Telecommunications Consumer Protection Code (TCP Code)

Chapter 4: Consumer, Sales, Service and Contracts

Clause 4.1.3 (meeting consumer needs)

Clause 4.1.3(d) (different needs)

Formal warning

SingTel Optus Pty Limited

TCP Code

Formal warning

Vodafone Hutchinson Australia Pty Ltd

TCP Code

Formal warning

TPG Internet Pty Limited

Telecommunications Act

Clause 19 of Schedule 2: Priority assistance

Formal warning

Dodo Services Pty Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

MyRepublic Pty Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

Southern Phone Company Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

Foxtel Management Pty Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

Spintel Pty Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Clause 19 of Schedule 2: Priority assistance

Formal warning

Exetel Pty Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

Aussie Broadband Pty Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

Skymesh Pty Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

Australian Private Networks trading as Activ8me

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

V4 Telecom Pty Ltd

Telecommunications Act

Formal warning

Red Telecom Pty Ltd

TCP Code

Chapter 9: Code Compliance and Monitoring

Clause 9.1(registration with Communications Compliance for code compliance and monitoring

Clause 9.4 (providing compliance statements to Communications Alliance)

Formal warning

MyRepublic Pty Ltd

TCP Code

Formal warning

Lycamobile Pty Ltd

TCP Code

Chapter 9: Code Compliance and Monitoring

Clause 9.4 (providing compliance statements to Communications Alliance)

Infringement notice

Telecommunications Act

Failure to comply with a direction under section 121 of the Act

Vocal Channels Pty Ltd

TCP Code

Chapter 9: Code Compliance and Monitoring

Clause 9.1(registration with Communications Compliance for code compliance and monitoring

Clause 9.4 (providing compliance statements to Communications Alliance)

Direction to comply

Digital Technologies & Telecommunications Pty Limited

TCP Code

Chapter 9: Code Compliance and Monitoring

Clause 9.1(registration with Communications Compliance for code compliance and monitoring

Clause 9.4 (providing compliance statements to Communications Alliance)

Chapter 6: Credit and Debt Management

Clause 6.11 (financial hardship policy)

Direction to comply

Peak Connect Pty Ltd

TCP Code

Chapter 9: Code Compliance and Monitoring

Clause 9.1(registration with Communications Compliance for code compliance and monitoring

Clause 9.4 (providing compliance statements to Communications Alliance)

Formal warning

ACN Pacific Pty Ltd

Telecommunications (Consumer Complaints Handling) Industry Standard 2018 (Complaints Standard)

Section 7 of the Complaints Standard, requiring carriage service providers to have in place a complaints handling process that includes the minimum requirements for consumer complaints handling.

Formal warning

Amnet Broadband Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Astron Communication & Information Services Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Aussie Broadband Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Australian Phone and Internet Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Australian Private Networks Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Bvivid Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Engin Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Exetel Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Foxtel Management Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Fuzenet Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Intelico Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Internode Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Section 7 of the Complaints Standard, requiring carriage service providers to have in place a complaints handling process that includes the minimum requirements for consumer complaints handling.

Formal warning

My Net Fone Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Spintel Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Tangerine Telecom Pty Limited

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Vividwireless Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Westnet Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Dodo Services Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

iiNet Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

M2 Commander Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

MyRepublic Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Singtel Optus Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Primus Telecommunications Pty Limited

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Telstra Corporation Limited

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

TPG Internet Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

Vodafone Hutchison Australia Pty Limited

Complaints Standard

Formal warning

V4 Telecom Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Sections 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 20 and 21 of the Complaints Standard, requiring carriage service providers to meet requirements related to complaints handling.

Formal warning under the Complaints Standard

TCP Code

Chapter 7 of the TCP Code concerns the transfer of services between suppliers under various circumstances.

Direction to comply

Australia Broadband Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Section 7 of the Complaints Standard, requiring carriage service providers to have in place a complaints handling process that includes the minimum requirements for consumer complaints handling.

Remedial direction requiring the carriage service provider to establish a written complaints handling process that is complaint with the Complaints Standard.

Simply NBN Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Remedial direction requiring the carriage service provider to establish a written complaints handling process that is complaint with the Complaints Standard.

Oz Talk Communications Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Remedial direction requiring the carriage service provider to establish a written complaints handling process that is complaint with the Complaints Standard.

Flip TV Pty Ltd

Complaints Standard

Remedial direction requiring the carriage service provider to establish a written complaints handling process that is complaint with the Complaints Standard.

Flip TV Pty Ltd

Telecommunications (NBN Consumer Information) Industry Standard 2018 (Consumer Information Standard)

Section 7—Key Facts Sheets meeting minimum requirements must be made available for NBN consumer plans

Section 11—Minimum information requirements for advertising material about NBN consumer plans

Infringement notice

Mate Communicate Pty Ltd

Consumer Information Standard

Infringement notice

Business Service Brokers Pty Ltd

Consumer Information Standard

Infringement notice

Australian Private Networks Pty Ltd

Consumer Information Standard

Infringement notice

Simply NBN Pty Ltd

Consumer Information Standard

Infringement notice

My Net Fone Australia Pty Ltd

Consumer Information Standard

Infringement notice

Aussie Broadband Pty Ltd

Consumer Information Standard

Section 7—Key Facts Sheets meeting minimum requirements must be made available for NBN consumer plans

Section 11—Minimum information requirements for advertising material about NBN consumer plans

Infringement notice

PIPE Networks Pty Limited

C564:2011 Mobile Phone Base Station Deployment Code (Deployment Code)

Clause 6.4.1(a) (information about the proposed location)

Clause 6.4.5(a) (having a website that includes the address of the proposed site)

Clause 6.7.3(d) (to prepare a report for the local Council that includes the likely dates for commencement of construction)

Clause 6.7.5(a) (to give the report to the council before commencement of the works)

Clause 6.7.5(b) (to update the website where construction is intended)

Direction (to comply with clause 5.2 of the 2018 Deployment Code)

Telstra Corporation Limited

Deployment Code

Clause 6.2.6 (fully complying with the consultation plan by contacting persons residing in the immediate vicinity of the facility).

Clause 6.4.4 (sending an enveloped letter containing the information in clause 6.4.1 of the Deployment Code 2011 to all Interested and Affected Parties).

Clause 11.3.1 (acknowledging a complaint in writing within 10 business days of the receipt of the complaint).

Formal warning

Telstra Corporation Limited

Telecommunications (Emergency Call Service) Determination 2009

Section 22 failing to ensure emergency calls made using emergency telephone services it supplies were carried to the relevant termination point.

Enforceable undertaking

Appendix 7: Disclosures of information

Customer information provided to telecommunications carriers and CSPs is protected under Part 13 of the Telecommunications Act. Carriers and CSPs are prohibited from disclosing that information to other parties—except in limited circumstances—and are required to report specific disclosures to the ACMA under section 308 of the Telecommunications Act.

The ACMA is required under paragraph 57(f) of the ACMA Act to include in its annual report information on disclosures of customer information made by carriers and CSPs during the reporting year. The disclosures made under Part 13 of the Telecommunications Act by carriers and CSPs are included in reports to the ACMA under section 308 and are set out in Table A.26 below for 2018–19.

Table A.26: Disclosures made under Part 13 of the Telecommunications Act—by carriers and CSPs

Reason for disclosure

(Sub)section

Number of disclosures, 2018–19

Under the Telecommunications Act

Authorised by or under law

280

8,432

Made as a witness under summons

281

86

To assist the ACMA

284(1)

744

To assist the eSafety Commissioner

284(1A)

0

To assist the ACCC

284(2)

94

To assist the TIO

284(3)

244,876

Calls to emergency service number

286

44,591

To avert a threat to a person’s life or health

287

18,842

Communications for maritime purposes

288

2

With the knowledge or consent of the person concerned

289

1,802,706

In circumstances prescribed in the Telecommunications Regulations 2001

292

0

Under the Telecommunications (Interception and Access Act) 1979

Voluntary disclosure

177

101

Authorisations for access to existing information or documents—enforcement of the criminal law

178

508,386

Authorisations for access to existing information or documents—locating missing persons

178A

2,269

Authorisations for access to existing information or documents—enforcement of a law imposing pecuniary penalty or protection of the public revenue

179

1,321

Authorisations for access to prospective information or documents

180

143,466

Enforcement of the criminal law of a foreign country (existing information)

180A

35

Enforcement of the criminal law of a foreign country (prospective information)

180B

10

Total

2,775,961

Source: Carriers and carriage service providers.

Part 13 of the Telecommunications Act allows information contained in the IPND to be disclosed for the testing and operation of telephone-based emergency warning systems by state and territory governments. The number and type of disclosures made under subsections 295V(1) or 295V(2) of the Telecommunications Act in 2018–19, as reported to the ACMA under section 295ZC of the Telecommunications Act, are set out in Table A.27.

Table A.27: Disclosures made under Part 13 of the Telecommunications Act—by emergency management persons (EMP) for telephone-based emergency warning systems

Reason for disclosure

(Sub)section of Act

Number of disclosures, 2018–19

Likely emergency

295V(1)

0

Actual emergency

295V(2)

13,628

Total

13,628

Appendix 8: Lawful disruption of access to online services by government agencies

If an Australian Government agency relies on subsection 313(3) of the Telecommunications Act to request internet service providers disrupt access to certain online services, they are required to follow the Guidelines for the use of section 313(3) of the Telecommunications Act 1997 by government agencies for the lawful disruption of access to online services. State and territory agencies are also encouraged to follow the guidelines. Agencies are advised to limit the use of subsection 313(3) in disrupting services to cases involving serious criminal or civil offences, or threats to national security.

The guidelines require agencies to report to the ACMA on the use of subsection 313(3) to disrupt online services and for this statistical information to be included in the ACMA’s annual report.

No Commonwealth, state or territory government agency reported that it had used subsection 313(3) of the Telecommunications Act to disrupt access to online services during the reporting period. This is reflected in tables A.28 and A.29 below.

Table A.28: Requests to disrupt online services under section 313(3) of the Telecommunications Act—by agencies

Reason for requests to disrupt services under section 313(3)

(Sub)section

Number of requests,

2018–19

Enforcing the criminal law and laws imposing pecuniary penalties

313(3)(c)

0

Assisting the enforcement of the criminal laws in force in a foreign country

313(3)(ca)

0

Assisting the investigation and prosecution of:

(i) crimes within the jurisdiction of the ICC (within the meaning of the International Criminal Court Act 2002)

(ii) Tribunal offences (within the meaning of the International War Crimes Tribunals Act 1995)

313(3)(cb)

0

Protecting the public revenue

313(3)(d)

0

Safeguarding national security

313(3)(e)

0

Total number of disruption requests

0

Source: Government agencies.

Table A.29: Online services blocked under section 313(3) of the Telecommunications Act— by agencies

Reason for online services blocked under section 313(3)

(Sub)section

Number of services blocked 2018–19

Enforcing the criminal law and laws imposing pecuniary penalties

313(3)(c)

0

Assisting the enforcement of the criminal laws in force in a foreign country

313(3)(ca)

0

Assisting the investigation and prosecution of:

(i) crimes within the jurisdiction of the ICC (within the meaning of the International Criminal Court Act 2002 ); and

(ii) Tribunal offences (within the meaning of the International War Crimes Tribunals Act 1995);

313(3)(cb)

0

Protecting the public revenue

313(3)(d)

0

Safeguarding national security

313(3)(e)

0

Total number of online services blocked

0

Source: Government agencies.

Appendix 9: Regional and Small Publishers Innovation Fund

The following information addresses the ACMA’s requirement under section 205ZL of the BSA (since September 2018) to report on information about the recipients of grants in accordance with section 46 of the PGPA Act.

Table A.30: Information on grants awarded by the ACMA during 2018–19

Recipient name

Amount
(excl. GST)

Purpose of grant

Ace Radio Broadcasters Pty Ltd

$50,000.00

To design and develop a new website for the online publication.

Agenda Media Pty Ltd

$163,636.37

To launch a series of five weekly email newsletters segmented to audiences who have opted-in to receive news across different industries including agriculture, sport, health, STEM and small business.

Alexandra Newspapers Pty Ltd

$18,181.82

To develop and expand the publisher’s existing digital media by adding the capacity to produce and release a weekly podcast. Develop social media to allow video reporting of features to their website and Facebook page.

Central West Media Pty Ltd

$45,454.55

To assist the publishers with their Digital Community Content Project towards the backend automation development and website development.

Elliott Newspaper Group Pty Ltd

$342,000.00

To purchase a new content management system package and develop new websites for their publications.

McPherson Newspapers Pty Ltd

$220,780.00

To create new digital efficiencies through the installation of new technology solutions.

Mildura Weekly Pty Ltd

$45,454.55

To create and produce daily video podcast interviews with people of interest in the local community.

Nascon Media Pty Ltd

$34,545.45

To develop a digital online platform to provide news and other information on developments in agricultural technology (fitting into the existing suite of agricultural news websites).

North East Media Pty Ltd

$18,181.82

To engage a media consultant to provide digital marketing training to the advertising sales team and facilitate a full digital workshop for the publisher’s current and prospective new advertisers.

North East Media Pty Ltd

$26,441.82

To develop an integration cloud-based software as a service, tailored specifically for the organisation’s needs and workflows.

Numurkah Leader Unit Trust

$80,000.00

To purchase a specialised newspaper content management system with paywall and advertising integration data.

Private Media Operations Pty Ltd

$414,845.45

To develop a new professional network module to the existing digital platform to be available to members.

Private Media Operations Pty Ltd

$362,727.28

To create a customer engagement and distribution platform.

Solstice Media Pty Ltd

$40,000.00

To develop and implement a structured, targeted membership and donation strategy.

Surf Coast News Australia Pty Ltd

$275,300.00

To create and develop a new website to complement the publisher’s existing print edition.

The Huon Newspaper Company Pty Ltd

$99,469.09

To launch a project aimed at digitising and increasing traditional news content to reach a broader audience.

The Irish Exile Pty Ltd

$68,181.82

To innovate the publication’s digital presence by upgrading its technological equipment and software, expanding its publication of digital content and improve digital audience engagement.

The North Western Courier Pty Ltd

$249,727.27

To develop its digital and interactive online presence. Create and update its current digital online publication.

The Saturday Paper Pty Ltd

$9,720.00

To engage a specialist third party to undertake a review of the existing customer relationship management solution and internal customer management processes.

The Saturday Paper Pty Ltd

$16,000.00

To design and implement pilot initiatives to improve user engagement and explore ways to better interact with readers and the wider community.

The Saturday Paper Pty Ltd

$140,000.00

To build a digital media studio at the publisher’s headquarters to produce and publish video and audio content, including podcasts.

The Trustee for Creighton Family Trust

$172,000.00

To purchase a newsroom content management system with paywall and ad management integration for the applicant’s website to complement the existing newspaper.

The Trustee for Ian Thomas Family Trust

$35,909.09

To develop an email engagement platform to consolidate email services and publishing platform and provide a single integrated interface for producing and managing email alerts for content and breaking news.

The Trustee for Parkes-Brown Family Trust

$18,181.82

To commission a company via tender to conduct market research to gain an objective assessment of the publication’s news content.

The Trustee for the Paton Family Trust

$41,754.00

To create a scoping study to develop concepts, determine key business drivers, and potential opportunities for a viable proposal project.

Warracknabeal Herald Pty Ltd

$115,592.32

To install new digital newsroom technology and upgrade computers and AV equipment.

Warragul Regional Newspapers Pty Ltd

$99,228.00

To launch a digital innovation project aimed at improving the publisher’s digital channels.

Western District Newspapers Pty Ltd

$221,315.36

To purchase a content management system specialised for digital newsroom publishing, with in-built ad management capabilities and paywall technology.

Total

$3,424,627.98

Advice to the ACMA by the Advisory Committee

The following information addresses the ACMA’s requirement, under paragraph 205ZL(d) of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992, to report on any advice given during the financial year to the ACMA by the Advisory Committee constituted by the then Minister for Communications and the Arts under section 205ZK of that Act. The ACMA had regard to advice from the Advisory Committee reported in this section when deciding to award the 28 grants listed in Table A.30.

Table A.31: Innovation Fund Advisory Committee members

Name

Organisation

Megan Brownlow (Chair)

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Louisa Graham

Walkley Foundation

Anna Reynolds

Australian Press Council

John Angilley

Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal, Expert nominee of Country Press Australia

Professor Peter Fray

University of Technology Sydney

Michael Malone

Superloop, NBN Co, SWM

The Advisory Committee reviewed 84 applications and recommended a shortlist of 29 applicants in round one of the Regional and Small Publishers Innovation Fund. The total recommended amount of $3.54 million was split between metropolitan and regional areas, as outlined in the Table A.32.

Table A.32: Summary of recommended amounts—metro/regional breakdown

Amount

Percentage

Metro total

$1,358,050.00

38.36%

Regional total

$2,182,621.90

61.64%

Total

$3,540,671.90*

100.00%

* This figure represents the aggregate amount of grant funding recommended by the Advisory Committee for the 29 shortlisted grant applications. The total of $3,424,627.98 represents the actual amount of grant funding for the 28 successful grant applications.

*This figure represents the aggregate amount of grant funding recommended by the Advisory Committee for the 29 shortlisted grant applications. The total of $3,424,627.98 represents the actual amount of grant funding for the 28 successful grant applications.

In considering the 84 applications, the Advisory Committee:

  • considered the overall quality of the applications to be low and recommended only $3,540,672 of the available $16 million to be allocated
  • was favourable to innovative proposals tied to a clearly identified market need that built on areas of expertise
  • looked unfavourably on applications lacking a market need or expertise, with unsustainable business models, and without valid costing or budget details
  • recommended changes to Innovation Fund guidelines to increase clarity for future applicants
  • provided additional guidance for future applicants
  • observed that to allocate funding to projects unlikely to succeed or that did not align with the objectives of the Innovation Fund would be irresponsible
  • took the view that many applicants lacked experience in making grant requests and misunderstood the objectives of the Innovation Fund.

Recommendations to the ACMA

Noting that there would be further funding rounds, the Advisory Committee recommended adjusting the application form to include:

  • requirements for quotes on costings
  • a demonstration of market demand for the proposal
  • data on the current size of the applicant’s business
  • a desired outcome if the application is successful—for example, increase in business size and audience
  • a reworking of the ‘efficient/effective’ section, which caused confusion.

The Advisory Committee considered a simple SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis might be a useful framework for future applications, along with additional support tools. It also recommended that eligibility be extended to not-for-profit organisations.

Recommendations for future applicants

The Advisory Committee recommended that the following advice be provided to applicants:

  • Consider the proven market demand for your proposal.
  • Weigh up your core competencies and assets and explain how your proposal leverages them.
  • Consider taking an iterative approach by seeking funding in stages.
  • Do not guesstimate the cost of your proposal—seek quotes and attach them.
  • Use data, robustly collected, where possible.
  • Look at other publisher models for inspiration and reference these.
  • Understand that ‘innovation’ is a method of adapting to meet new requirements of a changing audience and media landscape. It should be practical.
  • Read the conditions carefully.

Appendix 10: Advertising expenditure and market research

This appendix contains information for both the ACMA and eSafety.

Advertising

During the reporting period, advertising was placed for a range of purposes, including public notices, legal notices, job vacancies and small-scale campaigns targeted to both consumer and industry audiences.

During 2018–19 the ACMA or eSafety did not undertake any advertising campaigns with expenditure in excess of $250,000.

Expenditure on advertising in 2018–19 was $175,760 (see Table A.33).

Table A.33: Expenditure on media advertising organisations, 2018–19

Organisation name

Purpose

Amount of payment (including GST)

Mitchell and Partners

Public notices and general advertising

$28,887

Universal McCann

Public notices and general advertising

$116,152

Civic Media

General advertising

$19,415

Department of Health and Human Services Victoria

General advertising

$7,956

Be Visual Company

General advertising

$930

Graduate Careers Australia

General advertising

$2,420

Total

$175,760

Market research

Table A.34: Expenditure on market research organisations, 2018–19

Organisation name

Purpose

Amount of payment (incl. GST)

Colmar Brunton

NBN consumer experience research

$65,799

Social Research Centre

ACMA Annual Consumer Survey

$141,022

Woolcott Research & Engagement

Customer Service Centre Survey 2018

$13,750

Social Research Centre

Qualitative research on adults who exhibit image-based abuse behaviour

$68,978

Social Research Centre

Indigenous and eSafety research

$32,463

Whereto Research

National survey on parental attitudes to online safety

$163,350

Engine Asia Pacific

Telecommunications consumer experience research

$87,410

Plum Consulting London LLP

Spectrum allocations practices research

$59,250

University of Technology Sydney

News literature review

$90,815

Woolcott Research & Engagement

Customer Service Centre Satisfaction Survey

$20,625

Aetha Consulting Limited

Research on national positions and developments in 26 GHz band

$8,500

Clarity Strategic Research

Focus group research on older Australians for Be Connected

$26,400

Queensland University of Technology

Online safety education—best practice framework

$8,800

Student Edge Pty Ltd

Safety by Design youth consultation

$21,450

Whereto Research

Qualitative research on online safety of young people

$42,900

Whereto Research

Understanding experiences and support needs of frontline workers

$87,560

Total

$939,072

Appendix 11: Data reported by regulated entities

Data about control of media assets

On 1 March 2019, the ACMA published a new Register of Foreign Owners of Media Assets with information about foreign stakeholders and their interests in Australian media assets. This register was established under the Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Foreign Media Ownership, Community Radio and Other Measures) Act 2018, which commenced in September 2018. This Act has new notification requirements for foreign persons with interests in Australian media companies.

Foreign persons also have an ongoing obligation to notify the ACMA if they become, or cease to be, a foreign stakeholder. Foreign stakeholders have further annual reporting obligations.

Notifications by foreign stakeholders

During the reporting period, the ACMA received 222 foreign stakeholder notifications in relation to 92 foreign stakeholders.

Notifications of changes in control

We received notifications about nine events that affected the control of media
operations including:

  • five commercial television broadcasting licences
  • 10 commercial radio broadcasting licences
  • 18 associated newspapers.

Licensees, publishers and persons assuming control are obliged to notify the ACMA of changes in control of regulated media assets—namely, commercial radio broadcasting licences, commercial television broadcasting licences and associated newspapers.

We updated our public register with these new notifications, as well as our public database of regulated media assets and their controllers.

All notifications lodged with us in the reporting period for change-of-control events were processed within the statutory time frames.

During the reporting period, we did not receive any applications under section 67 of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 (BSA) for prior approval of temporary breaches of the statutory control rules, or under section 61AJ of the BSA for unacceptable media diversity situations.

Register of licensed interactive wagering services

In raising awareness of Australian gambling laws to help minimise the supply and use of illegal interactive gambling services, we are required under the Interactive Gambling Act 2001 (IGA) to maintain a register of interactive wagering service providers that are licensed by an Australian state or territory. At 30 June 2019, there were 128 entries on the register—41 were TABs, corporate bookmakers and betting exchanges and 87 were on-course bookmakers.

Australian content

All commercial television broadcasting licensees reported meeting primary channel (55 per cent) and non-primary channel (1,460 hours) transmission quotas for Australian content in 2018.

The transmission quotas are specified by the BSA and apply to programs televised by free-to-air commercial television broadcasters between 6 am and midnight each calendar year.

The amount of Australian content provided by commercial television licensees on their primary channels was high, with the Seven Network providing an average of 77 per cent local programming, the Nine Network an average of 74 per cent and Network Ten an average of
69 per cent. All three networks met the 1,460 hours quota for non-primary channels:

  • Seven Network averaged 5,210 hours
  • Nine Network averaged 3,696 hours
  • Network Ten averaged 2,697 hours.

Broadcasting Services (Australian Content) Standard 2016 and the Children’s Television Standards 2009

All licensees reported compliance with the annual sub-quota requirements for first-release Australian drama, documentary and children’s programs in 2018.

Regional radio local content obligations

Local content and presence obligations due to a regional radio trigger event

The BSA sets out circumstances where a trigger event for a regional commercial radio broadcasting licence causes additional obligations to apply to a regional commercial
radio licence1.

There were two trigger events affecting three regional commercial radio licences. None of those licences had previously been affected by a trigger event. All required draft local content plans and local presence reports were provided in the 90-day statutory time frame. The submitted local content plans set out how licensees will meet minimum service standards for local news, weather, community service announcements and emergency warnings.

Compliance with local content plans2

Annual reporting for the 2017–18 financial year showed a high level of compliance with their local content plans by trigger event-affected regional commercial radio broadcasting licensees.

Of the 145 annual compliance reports provided to us by trigger event-affected licensees, all reported compliance with the statutory minimum service standards. Only two reported non-compliance with their approved local content plans for four licences. These licensees provided less than the minimum number of eligible local weather bulletins specified in their local content plan (although all provided well in excess of the statutory minimum of five eligible local weather bulletins per week). Considering the low impact of the breach and the steps licensees took to rectify the non-compliance, all four cases were resolved with no further action.

Appendix 12: Outcome table

This appendix contains information for both the ACMA and the Office of the eSafety Commissioner and shows how much was spent (on an accrual basis) on achieving the outcome by funding source.

Outcome 1: A communications and media environment that balances the needs of the industry and the Australian community through regulation, education
and advice

Budget1 (1)

$’000

Actual2

(2)

$’000

Variance

(2) minus (1)

$’000

Program 1.1: Communications regulation, planning and licensing

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act Nos. 1 and 3)

50

-

50

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation

39,296

40,052

(756)

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year

5,332

5,769

(437)

Subtotal for Program 1.1

44,678

45,821

(1,143)

Program 1.2: Consumer safeguards, education and information

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act Nos. 1 and 3)

16,000

6,955

9,045

Special appropriations

300

-

300

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation

36,520

36,817

(297)

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year

4,922

5,769

(847)

Subtotal for Program 1.2

57,742

49,541

8,201

Program 1.3: Office of the eSafety Commissioner

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act Nos. 1 and 3)

6,921

6,832

89

Departmental expenses

Special account

Online Safety Special Account—s72 Enhancing Online Safety Act 2015

14,341

14,601

(260)

Subtotal for Program 1.3

21,262

21,433

(171)

Departmental

100,411

103,008

(2,597)

Administered

23,271

13,787

9,484

Total for Outcome 1

123,682

116,795

6,887

Average staffing level

427

409

1 Budget represents the original budget per the 2018–19 Portfolio Budget Statements.

2 Actual appropriations are the total available appropriation in 2018–19, including Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) budget adjustments.

Appendix 13: Entity resource statement

This appendix contains information for both the ACMA and the Office of the eSafety Commissioner.

Actual available appropriations for 2018–19

$’000

(a)

Payments made 2018–19

$’000

(b)

Balance remaining

$’000

(a-b)

Ordinary annual services

Departmental appropriation1, 2

121,613

99,131

22,482

Total

121,613

99,131

22,482

Administered expenses

Outcome 1

22,921

8,515

Total

22,921

8,515

Total ordinary services A

144,534

107,646

Other services

Departmental non-operating

535

535

-

Total other services B

535

535

-

Special appropriations

Special appropriations limited by entitlement

Public Governance, Performanc and Accountability Act 2013—s. 77

6,977

Telecommunication Act 1997s. 136C(4)

-

Total special appropriations C

6,977

Special accounts

Opening balance

1,953

1,953

-

Appropriation receipts

14,941

12,866

2,075

Non-appropriations receipts

900

900

-

Total special accounts D

17,794

15,719

2,075

Total resourcing A + B + C + D

162,863

130,877

1 This amount is net of $284,000 for the repealed Appropriation Act (No.1) 2015–16.

2 Children’s Online Safety appropriation is included in the Australian Communication and Media Authority’s Appropriation Act 1 however the appropriation is moved to the Online Safety Special Account s72 Enhancing Online Safety Act 2015.

Appendix 14: eSafety financial reporting

This appendix contains financial information on the operation of eSafety, presented in accordance with subsection 57(aa) of the ACMA Act.

2019
$’000

2018
$’000

Departmental

Operating expenses

Employee benefits

7,450

6,072

Supplier expenses

Consultants

316

288

Contractors

2,547

2,308

Outsourced services

2,405

3,267

IT and communications services

475

125

Travel costs

471

386

Other

553

852

Total supplier expenses

6,767

7,226

Total operating expenses

14,217

13,298

Capital purchases

Internally developed software

1,140

-

Leasehold improvements

215

-

Total capital purchases

1,355

-

Total departmental expenditure

15,572

13,298

Administered

Supplier expenses

Consultants

396

1,229

Contractors

3,749

3,321

Outsourced services

1,479

1,463

IT and communications services

1,014

1,013

Travel costs

100

72

Other

95

101

Total supplier expenses

6,833

7,199

Total administered expenditure

6,833

7,199

Appendix 15: List of requirements

Requirements for annual reports

Requirements in Schedule 2 of the PGPA Rule.

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report

Description

Requirement

17AD(g)

Letter of transmittal

17AI

Letter of transmittal

A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h)

Aids to access

17AJ(a)

Introduction

Table of contents.

Mandatory

17AJ(b)

Cross-reference

Alphabetical index.

Mandatory

17AJ(c)

Glossary

Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms.

Mandatory

17AJ(d)

Appendix 15: List of requirements

List of requirements.

Mandatory

17AJ(e)

Contact details

Details of contact officer.

Mandatory

17AJ(f)

Contact details

Entity’s website address.

Mandatory

17AJ(g)

Contact details

Electronic address of report.

Mandatory

17AD(a)

Review by accountable authority

17AD(a)

Cross-reference

A review by the accountable authority of the entity.

Mandatory

17AD(b)

Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i)

Functions and responsibilities

A description of the role and functions of the entity.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii)

Agency structure

A description of the organisational structure of the entity.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii)

Cross-reference

A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv)

Our purpose

A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(i)

The Authority

Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii)

The Authority

Position title of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(iii)

The Authority

Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period

Mandatory

17AE(1)(b)

N/A

An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity.

Portfolio departments ‑ mandatory

17AE(2)

N/A

Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AD(c)

Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F

Annual Performance Statement 2018–19

Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii)

Report on Financial Performance

17AF(1)(a)

Financial performance

A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance.

Mandatory

17AF(1)(b)

Appendix 13: Entity resource statement

A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity.

Mandatory

17AF(2)

Appendix 16: Financial statements

If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, Mandatory.

17AD(d)

Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

17AG(2)(a)

Cross-reference

Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems)

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i)

Letter of transmittal

A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(ii)

Letter of transmittal

A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii)

Letter of transmittal

A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(c)

Governance

An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(d) – (e)

Governance

A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non‑compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non‑compliance.

If applicable, Mandatory

External Scrutiny

17AG(3)

External scrutiny

Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny.

Mandatory

17AG(3)(a)

External scrutiny

Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(b)

External scrutiny

Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor‑General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(c)

External scrutiny

Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period.

If applicable, Mandatory

Management of Human Resources

17AG(4)(a)

Capability development

An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa)

Appendix 2: Staffing information

Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non‑ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full‑time employees;

(b) statistics on part‑time employees;

(c) statistics on gender;

(d) statistics on staff location.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(b)

Australian Public Sector (APS) classification and gender

Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non‑ongoing basis; including the following:

- Statistics on staffing classification level;

- Statistics on full‑time employees;

- Statistics on part‑time employees;

- Statistics on gender;

- Statistics on staff location;

- Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)

Arrangements of SES and non-SES employees

Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i)

Arrangements of SES and non-SES employees

Information on the number of SES and non‑SES employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c).

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(ii)

Salary ranges by classification level

The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(iii)

Performance payments

A description of non‑salary benefits provided to employees.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(i)

Cross-reference

Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii)

Cross-reference

Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii)

Cross-reference

Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv)

Cross-reference

Information on aggregate amount of performance payments.

If applicable, Mandatory

Assets Management

17AG(5)

Cross-reference

An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities

If applicable, mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6)

Procurement and contract management

An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

Mandatory

Consultants

17AG(7)(a)

Consultants

A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

17AG(7)(b)

Consultants

A statement that “During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c)

Consultants

A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d)

Consultants

A statement that “Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.

Mandatory

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8)

Access by Auditor-General

If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor‑General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, Mandatory

Exempt contracts

17AG(9)

Exemptions from reporting of Commonwealth contracts

If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10 000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, Mandatory

Small business

17AG(10)(a)

Cross-reference

A statement that “[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b)

Cross-reference

An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises.

Mandatory

17AG(10)(c)

Cross-reference

If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature—a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

Financial Statements

17AD(e)

Appendix 16: Financial statements

Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act.

Mandatory

Executive Remuneration

17AD(da)

Appendix 3: Executive remuneration

Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2‑3 of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(f)

Other Mandatory Information

17AH(1)(a)(i)

Appendix 10: Advertising expenditure and market research

If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii)

Cross-reference

If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(b)

Cross-reference

A statement that “Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(c)

Cross-reference

Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(d)

Freedom of information

Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(e)

N/A

Correction of material errors in previous annual report

If applicable, mandatory

17AH(2)

Appendix 15: List of requirements

Information required by other legislation

Mandatory

Requirements in section 57 of Part 6 of the ACMA Act

ACMA Act reference

Requirement

ACMA page reference

57(a)

A copy of each direction given to the ACMA under section 14 during the period

Directions and legislative instruments

57(aa)

A report on the following matters:

remuneration, and other employment-related costs and expenses, in respect of APS employees whose duties relate to the performance of the e-Safety Commissioner’s functions or the exercise of the eSafety Commissioner’s powers

any other costs, expenses and other obligations incurred by the Commonwealth in connection with the performance of the eSafety Commissioner’s functions or the exercise of the eSafety Commissioner’s powers

Appendix 2: Staffing information

57(b), (c)

A copy, or extract, of each instrument given to a carrier or to a carriage service provider under section 581 of the Telecommunications Act 1997 during the financial year

Directions and legislative instruments

57(d)

A report on the number and types of complaints made under Part 26 of the Telecommunications Act 1997. A report on the investigations conducted as a result of complaints made under Part 26. The results of those investigations

Telecommunications consumer protection compliance and enforcement outcomes

57(e)

A report on the operation of Part 6 of the Telecommunications Act 1997

Telecommunications consumer protection compliance and enforcement outcomes

57(f)

A report setting out statistical information relating to information or documents disclosed under Division 3 of Part 13 of the Telecommunications Act 1997

Disclosures of information

Requirement under section 205ZL of the BSA

BSA Act Reference

Requirement

ACMA page reference

205ZL

Reporting on information about the recipients of grants in accordance with section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

Regional and Small Publishers Innovation Fund

Other information required to be included by an Act or instrument

Requirement

Page reference

Reporting on work health and safety under Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011

Health and safety

Advertising and market research reporting requirements in section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

Advertising expenditure and market research

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

Appendix 16: Financial statements

For the period ended 30 June 2019.

  identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;  obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control;  evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority;  conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and  evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation. I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit. Australian National Audit Office Josephine Bushell Senior Director Delegate of the Auditor-General Canberra 3 September 2019

  identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;  obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control;  evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority;  conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and  evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation. I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit. Australian National Audit Office Josephine Bushell Senior Director Delegate of the Auditor-General Canberra 3 September 2019

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2019 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act. In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian Communications and Media Authority will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due. Nerida O’Loughlin PSM Chair 3 September 2019 Matthew Geysen Chief Financial Officer 3 September 2019

Statement of comprehensive income

for the period ended 30 June 2019

Original

Budget

NET COST OF SERVICES

Notes

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

2019

$'000

Expenses

Employee benefits

1.1A

56,940

52,848

58,690

Suppliers

1.1B

32,907

34,275

31,084

Depreciation and amortisation

3.2A

11,539

12,139

10,254

Finance Costs

1.1C

42

-

-

Impairment loss allowance on financial

instruments

1.1D

20

-

-

Write-down and impairment of assets

1.1E

1,560

804

-

Total expenses

103,008

100,066

100,028

Own-Source Income Own-source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services

1.2A

32

90

900

Other revenue

1.2B

792

3,954

-

Total own-source revenue

824

4,044

900

Gains

Other gains

1.2C

81

81

-

Total gains

81

81

-

Total own-source income

905

4,125

900

Net cost of services

(102,103)

(95,941)

(99,128)

Revenue from Government

5.1A

90,157

82,097

88,874

Deficit attributable to the Australian Government

(11,946)

(13,844)

(10,254)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation surplus

(385)

-

-

Total other comprehensive loss

(385)

-

-

Total comprehensive loss

(12,331)

(13,844)

(10,254)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Actual expenses were in line with the Original Budget set in May 2018, being 3% over the expenditure estimated in the 2018-19 Budget due to the additional funding provided to the ACMA through measures in the 2018-19 Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements (NSER and OeSC measures). Expenditure relating to the write-down and impairment of assets was not estimated in the Original Budget, with the actual expenditure representing the revaluation of Capalaba ($1.385m) following the Australian Government's agreement to sell the land to Redland City Council in late 2018-19.

The difference between 2018-19 revenue from Government and the Original Budget is driven by the additional funding provided through the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements. The ACMA's other revenue is demand driven and reflects cost recovered activities including police assistance, EPIRB triangulation and satellite coordination.

Statement of financial position

for the period ended 30 June 2019

Original

Budget

ASSETS

Notes

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

2019

$'000

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents

3.1A

3,630

3,100

1,468

Trade and other receivables

3.1B

23,887

24,196

23,759

Total financial assets

27,517

27,296

25,227

Non-Financial Assets

Land and buildings

3.2A

13,649

21,009

21,917

Property, plant and equipment

3.2A

7,980

5,217

9,313

Intangibles

3.2A

11,174

14,683

12,896

Prepayments

1,867

2,331

1,660

Total non-financial assets

34,670

43,240

45,786

Assets held for sale

3.2A

4,100

-

-

Total assets

66,287

70,536

71,013

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers

3.3A

4,856

7,454

6,419

Other payables

3.3B

1,074

519

2,816

Total payables

5,930

7,973

9,235

Provisions

Employee provisions

6.1A

20,030

17,313

16,872

Make good provisions

3.4

2,617

2,575

2,575

Total provisions

22,647

19,888

19,447

Total liabilities

28,577

27,861

28,682

Net assets

37,710

42,675

42,331

EQUITY

Contributed equity

121,274

113,826

122,053

Reserves

1,600

1,985

1,984

Accumulated deficit

(85,164)

(73,136)

(81,706)

Total equity

37,710

42,675

42,331

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

While Original Budget is broadly in line with 2018-19 actual results, the underestimation of Cash and Cash Equivalents relates to the expectation in the 2018-19 Portfolio Budget Statements that the OeSC would fully utilise the available funds in the Online Safety Special Account which did not occur.

The Original Budget estimates for Suppliers and Other Payables were higher than the actual results at 30 June 2019. This was predominantly due to the difference between the timing of end of year payments and the assumptions used to develop the Original Budget estimates. The 2018-19 Employee Provisions balance was higher than the Original Budget primarily due to the significant fall in the 10 year government bond rate used to discount the employee leave provisions.

Statement of changes in equity

for the period ended 30 June 2019

Original

budget

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

2019

$'000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY/CAPITAL

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period

113,826

106,534

114,605

Adjusted opening balance

113,826

106,534

114,605

Contributions by owners

Equity injection - Appropriations

535

50

535

Other movements

-

-

-

Departmental Capital Budget

6,913

7,242

6,913

Total transactions with owners

7,448

7,292

7,448

Closing balance as at 30 June

121,274

113,826

122,053

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period

(73,136)

(58,291)

(71,452)

Adjustment for errors1

-

(1,000)

-

Other movements2

(82)

(1)

-

Adjusted opening balance

(73,218)

(59,292)

(71,452)

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period

(11,946)

(13,844)

(10,254)

Total comprehensive income

(11,946)

(13,844)

(10,254)

Closing balance as at 30 June

(85,164)

(73,136)

(81,706)

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period

1,985

1,983

1,984

Other movements

-

2

-

Adjusted opening balance

1,985

1,985

1,984

Comprehensive income

Revaluation decrement on non-financial assets

(385)

-

-

Total comprehensive income

(385)

-

-

Closing balance as at 30 June

1,600

1,985

1,984

(Continued on next page)

Original

budget

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

2019

$'000

TOTAL EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period

42,675

50,226

45,137

Adjustment for errors1

-

(1,000)

-

Other movements2

(82)

1

-

Adjusted opening balance

42,593

49,227

45,137

Comprehensive income

Revaluation decrement on non-financial assets

(385)

-

-

Deficit for the period

(11,946)

(13,844)

(10,254)

Total comprehensive income

(12,331)

(13,844)

(10,254)

Contributions by owners

Equity injection - Appropriations

535

50

535

Departmental Capital Budget

6,913

7,242

6,913

Total transactions with owners

7,448

7,292

7,448

Closing balance as at 30 June

37,710

42,675

42,331

1Relates to the adjustment of ‘Retained Earnings’ from the 2016-17 Financial Statements. See further information in the overview.

2Relates to the coding of assets to the Statement of Comprehensive Income instead of the Statement of Financial Position.

Accounting Policy

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Budget Variances Commentary

The deficit reported by the ACMA in 2018-19 is higher than the Original Budget driven by the revaluation of Land held at Capalaba ($1.385m).

Statement of cashflows

for the period ended 30 June 2019

2019

2018

Original

Budget 2019

Notes

$'000

$'000

$'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Sale of goods and rendering of services

29

75

900

Appropriations

90,885

78,448

88,874

GST received

3,962

2,698

181

Other

1,505

3,265

-

Total cash received

96,381

84,486

89,955

Cash used

Employees

54,538

49,413

58,690

Suppliers

39,021

38,567

31,265

Section 74 receipts transferred to the Official Public Account

1,535

-

-

Total cash used

95,094

87,980

89,955

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities

1,287

(3,494)

-

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment

4,772

2,662

-

Purchase of intangibles

4,766

3,330

7,448

Total cash used

9,538

5,992

7,448

Net cash used by investing activities

(9,538)

(5,992)

(7,448)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Equity injections

535

400

535

Departmental Capital Budget

8,246

5,600

6,913

Total cash received

8,781

6,000

7,448

Net cash from financing activities

8,781

6,000

7,448

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held

530

(3,486)

-

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the

reporting period

3,100

6,586

1,468

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting

period

3.1A

3,630

3,100

1,468

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Net cash from operating activities – The increase from the Original Budget is due to the additional funding provided through the 2018-19 Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements (NSER and enhancing online safety measures).

Net cash from investing activities – The increase from the Original Budget is due to the replacement of ageing IT desktop equipment.

Administered schedule of comprehensive income

for the period ended 30 June 2019

Original Budget

2019

2018

2019

Notes

$'000

$'000

$'000

NET COST OF SERVICES EXPENSES

Suppliers

2.1A

6,833

7,315

7,221

Grants

2.1B

2,266

-

16,000

Impairment loss allowance on financial instruments

2.1C

4,689

5,688

50

Total expenses

13,788

13,003

23,271

INCOME

Revenue Taxation revenue

Other taxes

2.2A

649,628

488,782

1,103,583

Total taxation revenue

649,628

488,782

1,103,583

Non-taxation revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services

2.2B

5,876

5,226

5,033

Fees and fines

2.2C

31,819

31,828

38,089

Other revenue

2.2D

17,607

4,149

4,130

Total non-taxation revenue

55,302

41,203

47,252

Total revenue

704,930

529,985

1,150,835

Gains

Sale of assets

2.2E

115

3,078,143

2,500

Total gains

115

3,078,143

2,500

Total income

705,045

3,608,128

1,153,335

Net contribution by services

691,257

3,595,125

1,130,064

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Expenses – The Original Budget for Grants expected the full expenditure of the first-year funding for the Regional and Small Publishers Innovation Fund. Actual expenditure was less than the Original Budget due to a lower level of eligible and competitive applications. Additionally, there was no Original Budget set for an impairment loss on taxation receivables.

Revenues – Original Budget revenue is significantly lower than the actual result due to the delay of the Regional Broadband Scheme (RBS) - $565m. RBS legislation is now expected to be introduced to Parliament during the Spring 2019 sitting.

Administered schedule of assets and liabilities

as at 30 June 2019

Original

Restated1

Budget

2019

2018

2019

Notes

$'000

$'000

$'000

ASSETS

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents

4.1A

451

868

500

Taxation receivables

4.1B

103,044

58,945

615,439

Trade and other receivables

4.1C

30,199

31,442

464,760

Other financial assets

4.1D

429,845

848,677

-

Total financial assets

563,539

939,932

1,080,699

Total assets administered on behalf of Government

563,539

939,932

1,080,699

LIABILITIES

Payables

Unearned revenue

4.2A

108,008

130,046

129,985

Other payables

4.2A

896

682

-

Total payables

108,904

130,728

129,985

Total liabilities administered on behalf of Government

108,904

130,728

129,985

Net assets

454,635

809,204

950,714

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1Relates to the understatement of revenue from the 700Mhz spectrum auction in 2018. See further information in the overview.

Budget Variances Commentary

The main driver for reduced taxation receivables is the delayed introduction of the RBS legislation. Additionally, Other Financial Assets includes the 700MHz spectrum sale which was previously reported as Trade and Other Receivables in the Original Budget.

Administered reconciliation schedule

for the period ended 30 June 2019

Restated1

2019

2018

$’000

$’000

Opening assets less liabilities as at 1 July

809,204

(1,496,201)

Income

705,045

3,608,128

Expenses

(13,788)

(13,003)

Transfers (to)/from Australian Government

Other movements2

117

-

Adjustment for errors1

-

46,288

Appropriation transfers from the Official Public Account (OPA)

16,764

14,090

Transfers to the OPA

(808,820)

(1,122,878)

Transfers to the OPA (collected on behalf on another entity)3

(253,887)

(227,220)

Closing assets less liabilities as at 30 June

454,635

809,204

1Relates to the understatement of revenue from the 700Mhz spectrum auction in 2018. See further information in the overview.

2Relates to the coding of liabilities to the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income instead of the Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities.

3Relates to the collection of the Telecommunications Industry Levy collected on behalf of the Department of Communications and Arts Public Interest Telecommunications Services Special Account.

Accounting Policy

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account

Revenue collected by the ACMA for use by the Australian Government rather than the ACMA is Administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the OPA maintained by the Department of Finance. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of the Australian Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the Administered cash held by the ACMA on behalf of the Australian Government and reported as such in the Administered Cash Flow Statement and in the Administered Reconciliation Schedule.

Administered cash flow statement

for the period ended June 2019

2019

2018

Notes

$’000

$’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Sale of goods and rendering of services

5,082

5,100

Taxes

580,315

476,965

Fees

31,751

32,702

Fines

560

72

Other

4,154

3,127

Total cash received

621,862

517,966

Cash used

Grants

2,266

-

Suppliers

6,510

7,546

Total cash used

8,776

7,546

Net cash from operating activities

613,086

510,420

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Revenue from sales of intangibles

432,440

825,954

Total cash received

432,440

825,954

Net cash from investing activities

432,440

825,954

Net increase in cash held

1,045,526

1,336,374

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period

868

502

Cash from the Official Public Account

Appropriations

16,764

14,090

Total cash from the Official Public Account

16,764

14,090

Cash to the Official Public Account

Administered revenue

(808,820)

(1,122,878)

Transfer to other entities (collected on behalf of another entity)

(253,887)

(227,220)

Total cash to the Official Public Account

(1,062,707)

(1,350,098)

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period

4.1A

451

868

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Overview

1. Financial performance

1.1 Expenses
1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains

​2. Income and expenses administered on behalf of government

2.1 Administered – Expenses
2.2 Administered – Income

3. Financial position

3.1 Financial Assets
3.2 Non-Financial Assets
3.3 Payables
3.4 Other Provisions

​4. Assets and liabilities administered on behalf of government

4.1 Administered – Financial Assets
4.2 Administered – Payables

5. Funding

5.1 Appropriations
5.2 Special Accounts
5.3 Regulatory Charging Summary
5.4 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangement

6. People and relationships

6.1 Employee Provisions
6.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration
6.3 Related Party Disclosures

7. Managing uncertainties

7.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities
7.2 Financial Instruments
7.3 Administered Financial Instruments
7.4 Fair Value Measurement

8. Other items

8.1 Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

Overview

Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the:

  • Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and
  • Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations – Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except where certain assets and liabilities are recorded at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Reporting of Administered activities

Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the Administered schedules and related notes.

Except where stated below, Administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

Taxation

The ACMA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

New Australian Accounting Standards

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

Other new standards, revised standards, interpretations and amending standards that were issued prior to the sign-off date, and are applicable to the current reporting period, did not have a material financial impact, and are not expected to have a future material financial impact on the ACMA.

Prior year adjustments

Departmental

During the 2018-19 financial year, it was identified that the 2016-17 financial statements included an overstatement of ‘Revenue from Government’ by $1.000m. This consequentially caused an equivalent overstatement in both ‘Other receivables’ and ‘Retained earnings’. Following the requirements under AASB 108 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors, the 2017-18 comparatives for ‘Other receivables’ and ‘Retained earnings’ have been amended. The ACMA does not consider this adjustment to be material to the 2018-19 financial statements.

Administered

It was identified in the 2018-19 financial year that the 2017-18 financial statements included an understatement of ‘Gains from Sale of Assets’ by $46.288m. This consequentially caused an equivalent understatement in both ‘Other financial assets’ and ‘Retained earnings’. Under AASB 108 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors, the 2017-18 balances for ‘Other financial assets’ and ‘Retained earnings’ have been restated. The error arose in the recognition of revenue in 2017-18 from the auction of 700MHz spectrum, which gave an option to the winning bidders to pay an upfront winning price or a delayed winning price under the Radiocommunications (Spectrum Licence Allocation – 700 MHz Band) Determination 2016. The winning bidders elected to pay the delayed winning price, however the ACMA recognised the upfront winning price in the 2017-18 financial statements.

Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the ACMA has made a judgement for the provision for long service leave which has been estimated using present value techniques, which take into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

No other accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

Events after the reporting period Departmental

There are no known events occurring after the reporting period that could impact on the financial statements.

Administered

There are no known events occurring after the reporting period that could impact on the financial statements.

1. Financial performance

This section analyses the financial performance of the ACMA for the year ended 30 June 2019.

1.1 Expenses

Note 1.1A: Employee Benefits

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Wages and salaries

39,012

37,937

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans

4,147

3,320

Defined benefit plans

4,021

4,036

Leave and other entitlements

9,233

6,907

Separation and redundancies

527

648

Total employee benefits

56,940

52,848

Accounting Policy

For accounting policies on employee related expenses please refer to Section 6, People and Relationships.

Note 1.1B: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Contractors

7,110

6,318

I.T. and communications services

6,936

6,473

Outsourced services

5,222

6,014

Consultants

2,416

1,976

Travel costs

2,101

2,068

Occupancy costs

1,613

2,088

Other

1,191

2,345

Stationery and publications

551

562

Legal costs

246

112

Total goods and services supplied or rendered

27,386

27,956

Goods supplied

571

781

Services rendered

26,815

27,175

Total goods and services supplied or rendered

27,386

27,956

Other suppliers

Operating lease rentals

5,126

5,985

Workers compensation expenses

395

334

Total other suppliers

5,521

6,319

Total suppliers

32,907

34,275

Commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows:

Within 1 year

6,428

6,196

Between 1 to 5 years

16,693

21,677

More than 5 years

-

1,444

Total operating lease commitments

23,121

29,317

Leasing commitments

Office lease payments are subject to annual increases, generally in accordance with upward movements of the Consumer Price Index increased by a fixed rate. All office accommodation leases are current. A number of leases allow for extensions, the longest option providing for two five year extensions at the ACMA’s discretion. On renewal, each lease allows for a market review to set the net rental base.

Accommodation lease

Minimum end date period

Brisbane

March 2021

Canberra

August 2023

Melbourne

December 2023

Lucas Heights

December 2018

Sydney

February 2021

Accounting Policy

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

Note 1.1C: Finance Costs

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Unwinding of discount

42

-

Total finance costs

42

-

Note 1.1D: Impairment Loss Allowance on Financial Instruments

Impairment of financial instruments

20

-

Total impairment loss allowance on financial instruments

20

-

Note 1.1E: Write-Down and Impairment of Other Assets

Write-down of property, plant and equipment

3

49

Write-down of land

1,385

-

Impairment of intangible assets

172

755

Total write-down and impairment of assets

1,560

804

1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains

Own-Source Revenue

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Note 1.2A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services

Sale of goods

32

7

Rendering of services

-

83

Total sale of goods and rendering of services

32

90

Note 1.2B: Other Revenue

Number allocation charges

-

1

Other1

792

3,953

Total other revenue

792

3,954

1Other revenue consists of cost recovery income received for work completed for satellite co-ordination charges collected by the ACMA, EPIRB triangulation and police investigation assistance.

Accounting Policy

Revenue

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when: the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer; the ACMA retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods, the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured and it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the ACMA.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion of costs incurred to date compared to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Gains

Note 1.2C: Other Gains

Resources received free of charge

81

81

Total other gains

81

81

Accounting Policy

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources are recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature. The value of income represents the services provided free of charge by the Australian National Audit Office.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for a nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government agency or authority as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

​2. Income and expenses administered on behalf of government

This section analyses the activities that the ACMA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government.
Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

2.1 Administered – Expenses

2019

2018

$'000

$'000

Note 2.1A: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Contractors

5,228

4,784

I.T. and communications services

1,014

1,013

Consultants

396

1,229

Travel

100

72

Other

95

217

Total goods and services supplied or rendered

6,833

7,315

Goods supplied

14

9

Services rendered

6,819

7,306

Total goods and services supplied or rendered

6,833

7,315

Note 2.1B: Grants

Private sector

Not-for-profit organisations

2,266

-

Total grants

2,266

-

Note 2.1C: Impairment Loss Allowance on Financial Instruments

Asset write-downs and impairments

4,689

5,688

Total impairment loss allowance on financial instruments

4,689

5,688

Accounting Policy

Grants

The ACMA administers a number of grants on behalf of the Australian Government. Grant liabilities are recognised to the extent that (i) the services required to be performed by the grantee have been performed; or

(ii) the grant eligibility criteria have been satisfied, but payments due have not been made. Where grant monies are paid in advance of performance or eligibility, a prepayment is recognised.

2.2 Administered – Income

2019

2018

$’000

$’000

Taxation Revenue

Note 2.2A: Other Taxes

Broadcasting licence charges

104,595

-

Radio communications taxes

231,146

201,566

Telecommunication numbering charges

60,000

60,000

Industry contributions

253,887

227,216

Total other taxes

649,628

488,782

Non-Taxation Revenue

Note 2.2B: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services

Sale of goods

5,876

5,226

Total sale of goods and rendering of services

5,876

5,226

Note 2.2C: Fees and Fines

Licence fees

31,259

31,756

Fines and penalties

560

72

Total fees and fines

31,819

31,828

Note 2.2D: Other Revenue

Other

4,118

4,149

Unwinding of discount1

13,489

-

Total other revenue

17,607

4,149

Gains

Note 2.2E: Gains from Sale of Assets

Proceeds from sale2

115

3,078,143

Total gains from sale of assets

115

3,078,143

1Unwinding of discount relates to the application of the effective interest method to Accrued Revenue from the 700MHz spectrum auction. Refer to Note 4.1D for further details.

2The prior year balance represents the revenue from the sale of 3.4Ghz spectrum.

Accounting Policy

Revenue

All Administered revenues relate to the ordinary activities performed by the ACMA on behalf of the Australian Government. Contributions from industries in the form of taxes, industry levies and fines are recognised as revenue when the economic activity giving rise to the Australian Government's right to the contribution has taken place and the liability to contribution can be reliably measured.

3. Financial position

This section analyses the ACMA’s assets used to conduct is operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

3.1 Financial Assets

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Note 3.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit

3,575

3,033

Cash held for external parties

55

67

Total cash and cash equivalents

3,630

3,100

Note 3.1B: Trade and Other Receivables

Appropriations receivables

For existing outputs

22,483

23,008

Total appropriations receivable

22,483

23,008

Other receivables

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office

708

582

Other1

716

606

Total other receivables

1,424

1,188

Total trade and other receivables (gross)

23,907

24,196

Less impairment loss allowance

20

-

Total trade and other receivables (net)

23,887

24,196

1The 2018 balance has reduced from $1.606m in the 2017-18 financial statements. This relates to the adjustment of ‘Retained Earnings’ from the 2016-17 financial statements. See the overview for further information.

Credit terms for other receivables were within 30 days (2018: 30 days).

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

3.2 Non-Financial Assets

Note 3.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles for 2019

Land

Buildings

Leasehold improvements

Other property, plant &

equipment

Computer software internally

developed

Computer software purchased

Total

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

As at 1 July 2018

Gross book value

-

-

-

-

56,022

11,888

67,910

Fair value

7,250

194

15,252

6,781

-

-

29,477

Work in progress (WIP)

-

-

-

894

1,129

-

2,023

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation

-

(17)

(1,670)

(2,458)

(43,990)

(10,366)

(58,501)

Total as at 1 July 2018

7,250

177

13,582

5,217

13,161

1,522

40,909

Additions

By purchase

-

-

276

3,783

1,658

1,217

6,934

Movement in WIP

-

-

-

713

1,891

-

2,604

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other

comprehensive income

(385)

-

-

-

-

-

(385)

Assets held for sale1

4,100

-

-

-

-

-

4,100

Depreciation and amortisation

-

(17)

(1,749)

(1,670)

(7,276)

(827)

(11,539)

Reclassification

(4,100)

-

-

-

-

-

(4,100)

Impairments recognised in net cost of services

(1,385)

-

-

(3)

(172)

-

(1,560)

Other movements

-

-

-

(60)

-

-

(60)

Total as at 30 June 2019

5,480

160

12,109

7,980

9,262

1,912

36,903

Total as at 30 June 2019 represented by:

Gross book value

-

-

-

-

57,508

13,105

70,613

Fair value

5,480

194

15,528

10,500

-

-

31,702

Work in progress

-

-

-

1,607

3,020

-

4,627

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation

-

(34)

(3,419)

(4,127)

(51,266)

(11,193)

(70,039)

Total as at 30 June 2019

5,480

160

12,109

7,980

9,262

1,912

36,903

1Land at Capalaba is held for sale at 30 June 2019 valued at $4.1m. A Heads of Agreement has been signed with Redland City Council for the sale of the land with settlement expected to occur in 2019-20.

Revaluation of non-financial assets

Land at Capalaba was revalued prior to being held for sale in accordance with AASB 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant, equipment and intangible assets

The ACMA has no commitments for the acquisition of non-financial assets.

Accounting Policy

Acquisition of Assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate. Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor's accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $5,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). The asset thresholds have not been changed during the current financial year. The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the ACMA where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the ACMA’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the ‘make good’ recognised.

Asset Class

Threshold

Buildings

$50,000

Leasehold improvements

$10,000

Plant and equipment

$5,000

Motor vehicles

$10,000

Software – purchased

$10,000

Software – internally developed

$10,000

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined:

Asset class

Revaluation cycle

Fair Value Measured at

Land

Tri-annually

Market approach

Building

Tri-annually

Depreciated replacement cost

Leasehold improvements

Tri-annually

Depreciated replacement cost

Plant and equipment

Tri-annually

Market approach

Motor vehicles

Tri-annually

Market approach

Following initial recognition at cost, property plant and equipment is carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve, except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/(deficit). Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/(deficit) except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the ACMA using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Asset Class

Useful Life

Buildings

5 to 40 years

Leasehold improvements

Lease term

Plant and equipment

3 to 15 years

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2019. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount. The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the ACMA were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Intangibles

The ACMA’s intangibles comprise of internally developed and purchased software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses. Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the ACMA’s software are 3 to 10 years, and have not changed from the prior year.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

3.3 Payables

Note 3.3A: Suppliers

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Trade creditors and accruals

2,774

4,377

Operating lease rentals

2,082

3,077

Total supplier payables

4,856

7,454

The majority of suppliers engaged had 30 day payment terms.

Note 3.3B: Other Payables

Unearned revenue

634

-

Salaries and wages

365

381

Superannuation

64

60

Separations and redundancies

-

67

Other

11

11

Total other payables

1,074

519

3.4 Other Provisions

Reconciliation of the Other Provisions Account:

Provision for restoration

$’000

Total

$’000

As at 1 July 2018

2,575

2,575

Amounts reversed

-

-

Amounts used

-

-

Other movements

42

42

Total as at 30 June 2019

2,617

2,617

As indicated on the Schedule of Commitments, the ACMA currently has 5 major agreements for the leasing of premises which have provisions requiring the ACMA to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease (2018: 5).

​4. Assets and liabilities administered on behalf of government

This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result the ACMA does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

4.1 Administered – Financial Assets

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Note 4.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash in special accounts

86

40

Cash on hand or on deposit

365

828

Total cash and cash equivalents

451

868

Note 4.1B: Taxation Receivables

Other taxes

113,125

65,164

Total taxation receivables (gross)

113,125

65,164

Less: impairment loss allowance

Other taxes

10,081

6,219

Total receivables (net)

103,044

58,945

Note 4.1C: Trade and Other Receivables

Other receivables

Annual Carrier Licence Charge

31,184

31,678

Statutory receivables

92

48

Total other receivables

31,276

31,726

Total trade and other receivables (gross)

31,276

31,726

Less: impairment loss allowance

Other receivables

1,077

284

Total trade and other receivables (net)

30,199

31,442

Credit terms for other receivables were within 30 days (2018: 30 days).

Note 4.1D: Other Financial Assets

Prepayments

8

-

Accrued revenue1, 2

429,837

848,677

Total other financial assets

429,845

848,677

1Accrued revenue represents the remaining instalment relating to the sale of 700MHz spectrum in 2017-18. This instalment for the 700MHz auction is payable in 2019-20.

2Accrued revenue for 2018 was understated by $46.288m relating to the understatement of revenue from the 700Mhz spectrum auction. See further information in the overview.

4.2 Administered – Payables

2019

2018

$'000

$'000

Note 4.2A: Other Payables

Unearned revenue1

108,008

130,046

Other

896

682

Total other payables

108,904

130,728

1Unearned revenue represents radiocommunication licences paid in advance where the benefit has not yet been realised by the holder.

5. Funding

This section identifies the ACMA’s funding structure.

5.1 Appropriations

Note 5.1A: Departmental annual and unspent appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

2019

$’000

2018

$’000

Ordinary annual services

Annual Appropriation

Operating

90,157

82,097

Capital budget

6,913

7,242

Section 74 receipts

1,535

-

Total available appropriation

98,605

89,339

Appropriation applied (current and prior years)

(98,601)

(89,779)

Variance

4

(440)

Opening unspent appropriation balance

26,392

26,832

Repeal of Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2015-16

(284)

-

Closing unspent appropriation balance

26,112

26,392

Balance comprises appropriations as follows1:

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2015-16

-

34

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2015-16 Capital Budget (DCB)

-

250

Supply Act (No. 1) 2016-17 Capital Budget (DCB)

-

1,937

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017-18 Capital Budget (DCB)

933

7,142

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017-18

-

12,852

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2017-18

-

1,077

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017-18 cash held by the agency

-

3,100

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 Capital Budget (DCB)

6,813

-

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19

13,981

-

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2018-19

755

-

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 cash held by the agency

3,630

-

Total unspent appropriation - ordinary annual services

26,112

26,392

Other services

Annual Appropriation

Equity injections

535

50

Total available appropriation

535

50

Appropriation applied (current and prior years)

(535)

(400)

Variance

-

(350)

Opening unspent appropriation balance

-

350

Closing unspent appropriation balance

-

-

Total unspent appropriation

26,112

26,392

1Departmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1, 3). They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

Accounting Policy

Revenue from Government - Departmental

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the ACMA gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned.

Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Note 5.1B: Administered annual and unspent appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Ordinary annual services

Annual appropriation

Operating

22,921

8,156

Total available appropriation

22,921

8,156

Appropriation applied (current and prior years)

(8,983)

(6,984)

Variance

13,938

1,172

Opening unspent appropriation balance

2,400

1,228

Closing unspent appropriation balance

16,338

2,400

Balance comprises appropriations as follows1:

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2016-17

1,011

1,011

Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2017-18

921

1,389

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19

14,406

-

Total unspent appropriation - ordinary annual services

16,338

2,400

Total unspent appropriation

16,338

2,400

1The total unspent appropriation is shown inclusive of Section 51 permanent quarantines against Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2016-17 of $1.011m and Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2017-18 of $0.921m.

Note 5.1C: Special Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Appropriation applied

2019

2018

Authority

Type

$'000

$'000

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 s77 Repayments2

Refund

6,977

6,700

Total special appropriations applied

6,977

6,700

2Relates to the refund of radiocommunications licences surrendered before the expiration date.

5.2 Special Accounts

Note 5.2A: Special Accounts ('Recoverable GST exclusive'

2019

$'000

2018*

$'000

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Balance brought forward from previous period*

2,009

5,448

40

195

Increases

15,841

11,304

77

-

Total increases

17,850

16,752

117

195

Available for payments

17,850

16,752

117

195

Decreases

Departmental

(15,724)

(14,743)

-

-

Total departmental

(15,724)

(14,743)

-

-

Administered

-

-

(31)

(155)

Total administered

-

-

(31)

(155)

Total decreases

(15,724)

(14,743)

(31)

(155)

Total balance carried to the next period

2,126

2,009

86

40

Balance represented by:

Cash held in entity bank accounts

51

56

-

-

Cash held in the Official Public Account

2,075

1,953

86

40

Total balance carried to the next period

2,126

2,009

86

40

*2018 balances have been amended for the Online Safety Special Account to reflect the actual opening balance in 2019.

1Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013; section 80.

Establishing Instrument: Enhancing Online Safety Act 2015; section 72.

Purpose: To enhance online safety for Australians.

2Appropriation: Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997; section 20.

Establishing Instrument: FMA Act (Establishment of SOETM Special Account – ACMA) Determination 2012/03 . Purpose: This account was created to disburse amounts held on trust or otherwise for the benefit of a person other than the Commonwealth.

5.3 Regulatory Charging Summary

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Amounts applied

Departmental

Annual appropriations

19,467

20,559

Own source revenue

432

314

Administered

Special appropriations

-

300

Total amounts applied

19,899

21,173

Expenses

Departmental

19,986

20,973

Administered

-

86

Total expenses

19,986

21,059

External revenue

Departmental

432

314

Administered

38,351

38,801

Total external revenue

38,783

39,115

Cost Recovered Activities:

The Administered revenue includes the Annual Carrier Licence Charge (2019 - $31.18m; 2018 - $31.67m) which is based on the cost of services provided by the ACMA, ACCC and the Department of Communications and the Arts. The ACMA is responsible for invoicing and collecting the charges from the telecommunications carriers on behalf of other participating Government organisations.

The administered revenue also included the money received on behalf of the Postal Industry Ombudsman (PIO) for investigation of complaints (2019 - $1.08m; 2018 - $0.56m). The ACMA is only responsible for invoicing and collecting the charges on behalf of the PIO.

5.4 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangement

2019

2018

$'000

$'000

Total comprehensive income loss less depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations

(792)

(1,705)

Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation

(11,539)

(12,139)

Total comprehensive loss - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income

(12,331)

(13,844)

6. People and relationships

This section describes a range of employment and post-employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

6.1 Employee Provisions

Note 6.1A: Employee Provisions

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Leave

20,030

17,313

Total employee provisions

20,030

17,313

Accounting Policy

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as the net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes a provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the ACMA is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the ACMA’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the short hand method prescribed under section 24 of the Financial Reporting Rule. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Separation and Redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The ACMA recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the termination.

Superannuation

ACMA staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) or other superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The ACMA makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Australian Government. The ACMA accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans. The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

6.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration

Key Management Personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly. The ACMA has determined the Key Management Personnel to be the Chair, Deputy Chair, General Managers and the eSafety Commissioner.

Key Management Personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

2019

$

2018

$

Short-term employee benefits

2,360,890

2,261,014

Post-employment benefits

331,312

339,602

Other long-term employee benefits

63,566

52,254

Termination benefits

-

-

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1

2,755,768

2,652,870

The total number of Key Management Personnel that are included in the above table is 10 (2018: 9).

The 2017-18 comparatives have been amended following a review of the composition of the ACMA's Key Management Personnel under the definition provided in AASB 124 Related Parties. Additionally, a review of the 2017-18 comparative balances was undertaken, which resulted in adjustments for amounts previously reported in this note for leave taken and paid out.

1The above Key Management Personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the ACMA.

6.3 Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships:

The ACMA is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the ACMA are Key Management Personnel including the Portfolio Minister, the Chair, the Deputy Chair, General Managers, the eSafety Commissioner and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with related parties:

Given the breadth of Australian Government activities, related parties may transact with the Government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

Significant transactions with related parties can include:

  • the payments of grants or loans;
  • purchases of goods and services;
  • asset purchases, sales transfers or leases;
  • debts forgiven; and
  • guarantees.

Giving consideration to relationships with related entities, and transactions entered into during the reporting period by the ACMA, it has been determined that there are no related party transactions to be separately disclosed (2018: nil).

7. Managing uncertainties

This section analyses how the ACMA manages financial risks within its operating environment.

7.1 Contingement Assets and Liabilities

Departmental

The ACMA is not aware of any Departmental quantifiable, unquantifiable or significant remote contingent assets or liabilities (2018: nil).

Administered

The ACMA is not aware of any material Administered quantifiable, unquantifiable or significant remote contingent assets or liabilities (2018: nil).

Accounting Policy

Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the Statement of Financial Position but are reported in the relevant notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

7.2 Financial Instruments

Note 7.2A: Categories of Financial Instruments

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Financial assets under AASB 139 Loans and receivables

Cash and cash equivalents

3,100

Trade and other receivables

606

Total loans and receivables

3,706

Financial assets under AASB 9 Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash and cash equivalents

3,630

Trade and other receivables

716

Total financial assets at amortised cost

4,346

Total financial assets

4,346

3,706

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Trade creditors and accruals

2,774

4,377

Total financial liabilities at amortised cost

2,774

4,377

Carrying amount of financial liabilities

2,774

4,377

Classification of financial assets on the date of initial application of AA SB9

Financial assets class

Notes

AASB 139 original classification

AASB 9 new classification

AASB 139 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

Cash and cash equivalents

3.1A

Loans and receivable

Amortised cost

3,100

3,100

Trade receivables

3.1B

Loans and receivable

Amortised cost

606

606

Total financial assets

3,706

3,706

Reconciliation of carrying amounts of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9

Financial assets class

AASB 139 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

Reclassification

$'000

Remeasurement

$'000

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

Financial assets at amortised cost

Loans and receivable

Cash and cash equivalents

3,100

-

-

3,100

Trade receivables

606

-

-

606

Total amortised cost

3,706

-

-

3,706

The carrying value of financial assets and liabilities is a reasonable approximation of fair value.

7.3 Administered Financial Instruments

Note 7.3A: Categories of Financial Instruments

2019

2018

$'000

$'000

Financial Assets under AASB 139

Loans and receivables

Cash and cash equivalents

868

Fees, charges and other revenue receivables

31,394

Accrued revenue

848,677

Total loans and receivables

880,939

Financial Assets under AASB 9

Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash and cash equivalents

451

Fees, charges and other revenue receivables

30,107

Accrued revenue

429,837

Total financial assets at amortised cost

460,395

Carrying amount of financial assets

460,395

880,939

Classification of financial assets on the date of initial application of AA SB9

Financial assets class

Notes

AASB 139 original classification

AASB 9 new classification

AASB 139 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

Cash and cash equivalents

4.1A

Loans and receivable

Amortised cost

868

868

Fees, charges and other revenue receivables

4.1C

Loans and receivable

Amortised cost

31,394

31,394

Accrued revenue

4.1D

Loans and receivable

Amortised cost

848,677

848,677

Total financial assets

880,939

880,939

Reconciliation of carrying amounts of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9

Financial assets class

AASB 139 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

Reclassification

$'000

Remeasurement

$'000

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

Financial assets at amortised cost

Loans and receivable

Cash and cash equivalents

868

-

-

868

Fees, charges and other revenue receivables

31,394

-

-

31,394

Accrued revenue

848,677

848,677

Total amortised cost

880,939

-

-

880,939

Accounting Policy

Financial Assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, the ACMA classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

  1. financial assets at fair value through profit or loss;
  2. financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and
  3. financial assets measured at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the ACMA's business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the ACMA becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date. Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

  1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and
  2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method. Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for Financial Assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial Assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12‐month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the Effective Interest Method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and Other Payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

7.4 Fair Value Measurement

All Non-Financial Asets with the exception of Intangibles are measured at fair value. Other than Assets Held for Sale, these are all recurring fair value measurements.

Key judgements and estimates

Valuation of Land and Buildings

Independent valuations are obtained tri-annually as at 30 June for Land and Buildings. These valuations include calculations of estimated market cash flows which are adjusted to take into account physical, economic and external factors relevant to the asset under consideration. All valuations conducted are in compliance with AASB 13.

Valuation of Leasehold Improvements, Plant and Equipment

The estimated cost to replace the asset has been calculated and then adjusted to take into account obsolescence and physical deterioration (accumulated depreciation). The obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external factors relevant to the asset under consideration.

8. Other items

8.1 Aggregated Assets and Liabilities

Note 8.1A: Departmental - Aggregate Assets and Liabilities Assets expected to be recovered in:

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

No more than 12 months

33,484

29,627

More than 12 months

-

-

Total assets

33,484

29,627

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

9,595

9,083

More than 12 months

18,982

18,778

Total liabilities

28,577

27,861

Note 8.1B: Administered - Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2019

$'000

2018

$'000

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months

563,539

510,095

More than 12 months

-

429,837

Total assets

563,539

939,932

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

100,381

121,806

More than 12 months

8,523

8,922

Total liabilities

108,904

130,728

Footnotes

  1. Subject to certain exceptions, a ‘trigger event’ for a regional commercial radio broadcasting licence is defined as: (a) a change in control of a regional commercial radio licence, (b) the formation of a new registrable media group where a regional commercial radio broadcasting licence is in the group or (c) a change in controller of a registrable media group where a regional commercial radio broadcasting licence is in the group. A trigger event for a regional commercial radio broadcasting licence is different to a trigger event for a regional commercial television broadcasting licence, as introduced by the Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Act 2017.
  2. Local content plans include obligations to meet minimum service standards for local news, weather, community service announcements and emergency warnings, and the requirement to prepare a local content plan and take all reasonable steps to comply with it.