Go to top of page

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Introductory Statement

We, as the accountable authority of the Anindilyakwa Land Council present the 2019-20 annual performance statements of Anindilyakwa Land Council, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). In our opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

In addition to ALC performance outcomes detailed below, in 2019-20 the ALC contributed to the key government priorities to overcome Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander disadvantage by directing of Statutory Royalty equivalents away from cash distributions and into Aboriginal Corporations delivering services that support: The ALC is not responsible for managing these funds which are paid to eligible Aboriginal Corporations to project manage..

1. Ensuring that children go to school. A total of $8,861,218 was directed to Education projects.

2. Increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment and economic and social participation. A total of $7,892,577 was directed to Economic/Commercial Development Projects. At June 2020 a total of 75 ALC employees (47% of total) were Aboriginal Traditional Owners.

3. Making communities healthy and safe. A total of $7,263,000 was directed to Health targeted projects, 4,037,144 to Housing projects, and $17,290,000 to Public Infrastructure Projects.

Analysis comment relative to all RDU performance measures

A significant element of the ALC’s activity revolves around the effective use of funds related to Mining Royalties. The appetite for the responsible use of Royalty flows is keenly felt by the individual members of ALC board, as noted by the high percentage of funds diverted into these projects, and away from what otherwise would be cash distributions to the Traditional Owners. It needs to be recognised that there is a community expectation that thus funded activities and projects have to have a more noticeable positive impact on the lives of the community residents than cash distributions. No small challenge.

The Board rely on measures in:

1. Their personal experiences as residents of the community being serviced

2. The measure of support in community feedback to them as individuals

3. The voting patterns at triennial Council elections.

To board members, these measures are the important, real, and relevant indicators. Conversely, there is little appetite to divert Royalty funds into formal evaluation, measurement, or assessment exercises, when such funds are felt to be better used elsewhere in actual service delivery. Projects thus funded are managed via payments to Aboriginal Corporations, whose performance is daily assessed by their target constituents and members, with negative feedback never restrained where performance is considered to be unsatisfactory. Understandably, attempts to obtain the Corporations’ engagement with external assessors generally results in expressions of frustration. Activities performed by the ALC under Funding from Grant programs or via S 64(1) ALRA are subject to their own performance measures, and are included in the statements below. Setting performance measures against these activities is also problematic due to the highly variable and unpredictable nature of royalty tied inflows.

Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity has therefore always been an issue, with the inability to attach reporting conditions on funded projects outside those imposed under 35(C) ALRA and has always required the ALC to reassert the fact that Royalty Equivalent projects are funded via unconditional Payments to Aboriginal Corporations that are “Private Monies” as determined by the Australian Government Solicitor. It is envisaged that using Social Ventures Australia under the voluntary “FUTURE GROOTE ACCORD” will provide some Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity in future years and this will put much of the angst with which the ALC annually deals, over both Annual Reporting and Corporate planning, essentially to bed. This did not occur in 2019-20 as the Aboriginal Corporations have yet to agree to sign up to the Accord.

Those performance measures in the table in the Performance Statement that are dependent on Statutory Royalty Equivalent fund flows are designed to reflect and cater for this variability which makes prediction of performance measures unreliable. Section 35(2) Determinations {section 64(3) Statutory Royalty Equivalents} were:

Year

Amt

2013-2014

$38m

2015-2015

$31m

2015-2016

$27.1m

2016-2017

$15m

2017-2018

$65m

2018-2019

$86m

2019-2020

$73m

2019-20 Performance Measures Result and Analysis

Objective Numbers below are a reference to their heading in the ALC corporate Plan 2019-20 to 2022-23, under which the strategies and activities reported on are listed.

Activity title and description

Activity performance measure

Program 10.1 Manage Land

The Land and Sea Management unit works to protect and manage the biodiversity, cultural, and recreational values of the Anindilyakwa Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) and surrounding sea country.

Ranger Program Funded under S 64(4) by PM&C now NIAA

Number of paid ranger days. As per funding agreement with PM&C. Narrative on impact of ranger activity on environment and community.

Result and Analysis

A total of 3007 paid ranger days.

As per funding agreement with PM&C.

WoC Ranger Coordinators 2x @ 1.0 FTE Non-Indigenous

WoC FT Rangers: 6x full time @ 1.0 FTE Indigenous

WoC Admin & Program Support @ 1.0 FTE Indigenous

WoC FT Admin and Training @ 1.0 FTE Non-Indigenous

IPA PT Ranger: 1 x part time @ 0.8 FTE)

IPA Coord @ 1.0 FTE

(+ Quarantine & Biosecurity Officer- GEMCO Funded

+ Ranger Manager- ALC Funded)

Narrative on impact of ranger activity on environment and community.

Through NIAA Funding ALC rangers are able to manage many aspects of the Indigenous Protected Area, which spans 10,000km², including land and sea management. Rangers facilitate meetings with Traditional Owners through the ALC Board to work on a variety of conservation and land management outcomes. Activities are not limited to, but include: Indigenous knowledge transfer through TO engagement, cultural site management, weed management, riparian and freshwater management, threatened species protection, marine debris on the coast, islands and reefs, visitor permitting system and subsequent management including signage and safety, community education and awareness, training and small scale fee for service opportunities including government and non-government contracts.

There are immeasurable social and cultural consequences of this Ranger program. Rangers have the opportunity to not only provide an income for their families, but to also bring home traditional foods as part of their occupation. This food has health benefits for the old and young people alike and is encouraged to be collected as part of the daily activities when encountered, as a side benefit of the Ranger program. The Rangers are viewed as role models within the community and in the family units, and provides an avenue for personal and professional growth.

Strategic Planning and Governance of the Anindilyakwa IPA

Number of IPA Management Committee Meetings and IPA Advisory Committee Meetings

Result and Analysis

The IPA Coordinator facilitated an IPA Advisory Committee meeting held on 19 November, 2019 at the Groote Eylandt Lodge. As well as Land & Sea Ranger staff, it was attended by 9x ALC board members, the CEO of the ALC, and 17x external stakeholders, including representatives from the NT DENR, NT DIPF, Australian Fisheries Management Authority, East Arnhem Regional Council, Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), the National Indigenous Advancement Agency, Groote Eylandt Mining Company (GEMCO), and the NT Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, Education and Workforce Training, Selena Uibo. The Rangers provided a progress report on work plan activities, external stakeholders gave feedback and updates from their organisations, and Minister Uibo formally launched the Groote Archipelago Threatened Species Management Plan.

Learning on Country Program

Number of students engaged in program and number of activities

Result and Analysis

ALC Rangers are no longer funded to deliver the Learning on Country Program, but rather contribute to the School Based Learning on Country program by inviting the school to engage in on-country activities. The Ranger program has supported both of the LoC programs within the Groote Archipelago. Staff from the Ranger team attended the LoC regional workshop in Darwin in September and have made staff available to form a local steering committee. Some of the activities that the Rangers engaged LoC students include sea grass monitoring, fauna specimen maintenance, Bickerton Island biosecurity awareness and buffalo monitoring and other on country ranger activities. Rangers have shared traditional ecological knowledge and western scientific process with LoC participants at Mukbmunja in May with regards to the oyster collection and translocations trials, and biodiversity surveys in June. Due to COVID-19 restrictions school camps could not be attended by Rangers due to hygiene issues associated with remote camping.

Administer and Issue Permits for Access to Areas in the Anindilyakwa IPA

Number of Recreation Permits sold. Number of Recreation Permits checked and proportion of individuals (of those checked) holding a current Recreation Permit.

Result and Analysis

626 Recreation permits were processed in 2019/20 year.

Rangers performed 30 routine patrols as part of our NT Fisheries obligations, as well as 12 land based patrols, focusing on long weekends and school holidays. Three people were found to not have valid recreation permits and were instructed to report to the Ranger Base at their earliest convenience, and all three obliged. All other people checked held valid recreation permits.

2 incidents were reported and investigated of having alcohol on recreation areas, and police handles each matter, after Rangers had provided information from witnesses and social media posts.

Raising community awareness of the ALC Rangers and Threats to the Anindilyakwa IPA

Number of media products produced (e.g. picture booklets, videos, media announcements, digital noticeboard stories)

Result and Analysis

Rangers have been working with the Language, Literacy and Numeracy trainer to develop wording for the new sign. Discussions are happening with the bi-lingual centre, education department, CrocWise awareness team and other key stakeholders including Gemco South32, EARC, and other aboriginal corporations to get incorporated safety information when entering Groote Eylandt. 6 Radio sessions with Umbakumba Radio occurred throughout the year. ALC Rangers are working on promoting their work through increased media distribution in the coming financial year in the form of short videos in conjunction with the ALC media department.

Mining Expansion

Initiatives are currently being managed under strict Commercial-in-Confidence arrangements. Details on progress will be reported once confidentiality requirements provide for reporting.

Result and Analysis

Within the reporting period GEMCO maintained high levels of production in the Western Leases however no mining expansion beyond normal planning was undertaken by the company. GEMCO’s plans to commence mining in the Eastern Leases have now been delayed until 2023 due to company planning changes. The GEMCO Exploration program has continued in the western region of the Southern Leases.

Winchelsea Mining Pty Ltd exploration program has continued on EL 27521 during the 2019-20 period and is expected to be completed in September 2020.

No other mining was undertaken or planned within the ALC jurisdiction

Program 10.2 Acquire Land

Pursue all appropriate avenues to achieve the acquisition of land for the benefit of Indigenous people.

Report on Native Title Claim Progress

Progress of Sea rights claim

Throughout 2019-20, the Anindilyakwa Land Council continued to work closely with the Northern Land Council on preparing the Makardalangwa (Groote Eylandt Seas) native title claim. The claim will cover an object area of sea country from the East Arnhem coast and around the Groote Archipelago. Applicants were authorised to make the native title claim at meetings held in November 2018 in Alyangula, Numbulwar and Ngukurr.

Professor Scott Cane, an experienced anthropologist, has been engaged to write an expert report about the claim. Professor Cane has completed extensive fieldwork. In April 2020, Professor Cane produced a final draft report. Throughout 2020, anthropologists from the ALC and the NLC will be working with senior native title holders to prepare biographies which will accompany Professor Cane’s final report.

There is now also a Makardalangwa Working Group, made up of representatives from all of the mainland and Groote Archipelago clans in the native title claim group. The Working Group will be meeting in the first half of 2021 to provide lawyers with further confidential instructions about the native title claim.

Program 10.3 Economic Development and Commercial Services

The ALC aims to contribute to improving the lives and futures of its Traditional Owners through achieving sustainable change

Direct Statutory Royalty Equivalents to Commercial, Economic or Social projects or responsible forms of expenditure

Reducing percentage of Royalties paid as direct deposits into TO’s accounts. Effectiveness and acceptance of INDUE card access.

Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

Only 9.6% of Statutory Royalty Equivalents were paid as direct deposits into TO’s accounts with another 4.8% accessed via INDUE card or similar no cash access.

The other 85.5% of these funds were directed toward various projects and these are graphically dissected at the end these statements.

Process applications and assist in making land use agreements on Indigenous lands

Number of Section 19a agreements issued

Result and Analysis

No Section 19a Agreements were issued during the reporting period.

The ALC management of Section 19 land use agreements under ALRA has been consistent and appropriate for the benefit of all stakeholders, and the requirements under the legislation. All land use agreements executed are of the highest standard, and interests of the Land Trust and Traditional Owners are protected.

Listed below are some of the current land use activities being dealt with by the Land Council

Documents - Comments /-Applicant /-Project Title

1. Negotiated and Executed S19 Lease Alyangula for Amagula Clan commercial rental development –- Executed /-Nuburrumanja Aboriginal Corp /-Alyangula ALRA lands

2. Blitner Clan S19 Lease Pole 10 - Executed /-Blitner Clan /-Blitner Clan S19

3. Negotiation S19 Bartalumba Bay, Stalled Traditional Trepang Traders Deception Bay Trepang Hachery

4. Building of Aquaculture Hatchery Qantas region Umbakumba – Negotiating with Mamarika Clan /-ARAC /-Aquaculture Hatchery project

5. Awaiting Deed of Grant for ALRA lands held in escrow with NT Gov. Negotiating S19 lease terms with PWC ongoing. /-Power and Water Corporation /-Angurugu Sewerage Ponds

6. Mining Camp and Laydown area Little Paradise for Winchelsea Mining - negotiation ongoing /-Winchelsea Mining Company /-Winchelsea Mining Company Little Paradise Camp and Laydown area

7. Lease renewal - negotiations ongoing /-Telstra Alyangula /-Telstra Tower

8. S19 Landfill Executed Bickerton Island – Executed /-East Arnhem Regional Council /-Bickerton Landfill

9. 2 Gravel Pits Negotiated along Umbakumba Road for maintenance works – Agreements Stalled /-NT Department of Infrastructure /-NTG Gravel Pits Umbakumba Road

10. Lighthouse lease renewal being Negotiated North East Isles – near complete /-Australian Maritime Safety Authority/-Lighthouse NE Isles

11. Realigned Haul Road Agreement Eastern Leases to allow for avoidance of Northern Hopping Mouse habitat - Executed GEMCO Eastern leases Realignment of Haul Road Access Agreement

12. J Deposit Haul Road Agreement - Executed /-GEMCO /-J Deposit Haul Road Emerald River Crossing Agreement

13. Meetings have been held with senior Northern Territory Government staff to negotiate the current land tenure issues in Alyangula for government assets which currently do not have leases in place on ALRA lands - Ongoing Northern /-Territory Government NTG /-Housing and Assets Alyangula S19

Process applications for consent to explore and mine on Indigenous land.

Monitor existing agreements

Result and Analysis

With the increase in economic development across the archipelago in the past 12 months, the ALC has been involved in numerous non-mining land use projects. Three Section 19 leases were granted in the last 12 months, being for the Bickerton Island Land Fill site (EARC), the Blitner Clan area near Alyangula, and an accommodation development by Nuburrumanja Aboriginal Corporation in Alyangula. Most new development activity across the archipelago has occurred within existing township leasing areas, and at homeland communities requiring minimal ALC input. Several Section 19 leases are currently in the discussion stage for Aquaculture facilities, a mining camp setup, a Light house renewal and a proposed access corridor across the intertidal zone.

Provide research and assistance and identify infrastructure requirements to enable Indigenous landowners and other Indigenous people to undertake commercial activity.

Narrative of activity undertaken extracted from ALC Traffic light report on RDU outputs

Result and Analysis

Royalty flow funded Projects commenced in 2019-20 as a result of the ALC inaugural capital investment strategy; this document identifies 85 projects resolved by the board to a total value circa. $130m and how to effectively deliver the quantum of infrastructure projects across the archipelago. Projects include ongoing work on subdivisions at Umbakumba and Angurugu, commencement of sport and recreation facilities upgrades, accommodation facilities for staff and contractors. Completion, fit out, occupation and operation of 19 homes, 16 shade shelters and 3 stand-alone solar power plants. In total $23M has been invested into capital infrastructure during this period. Additional infrastructure priorities identified as the program is delivered are present to the ALC board for inclusion.

Establish and operate the RDU

Narrative of activity undertaken extracted from ALC Traffic light report on RDU outputs. Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

The RDU provided advice to the ALC Board on the distribution of $73.5M across 58 activities to 11 Aboriginal organisations in the 2019-20 year from statutory royalty equivalents and negotiated royalties. This included support for 8 Traditional Owner business enterprises. It provides ongoing accounting services and administration support to Anindilyakwa Royalties Aboriginal Corporation (ARAC), Bartalumba Mini Mart Aboriginal Corporation, Lagulalya Aboriginal Corporation, “Mungwardinamanja Aboriginal Corporation”, “Yimadumanja Aboriginal Corporation”, and a TO sole trader known as “Eylandt Clean-up Services”.

Develop and implement policies and procedures to improve leadership and governance, skill, and gender representation of Aboriginal Corporations

RDU KPI report to the AMT on support provided to ORIC corporations.

Result and Analysis

The table below shows the Gender balance within the Aboriginal Corporations' boards in the ALC’s area. Women occupy 36% of board positions, compared with the figure last year of 42%. The ALC is working closely with seven of the corporations below in the provision of accounting services and support.

Aboriginal Corporation FEMALE MALE

Lagulalya 4 7

GEBIE 1 5

Aminjarrinja 0 5

Amangarra 0 11

Angabunumanja 2 3

Aruburabura 0 3

Warningakalinga 4 2

Arirrki 0 4

ASAC 5 0

Mikbamurra 5 2

GEMYDU 3 2

Angarrmarada 0 3

ARAC 2 6

Bartalumba Mini Mart 3 3

Mungwardinamanja 2 4

Nuburrumanja 2 3

Groote Eylandt Community Watch 0 5

Anindilyakwa Advancement 2 4

Yimadumanja 3 6

Anindilyakwa Housing (AHAC) 5 4

Groote Eylandt Bickerton Island

Primary College 5 3

Totals 48 85

Continue to work in partnership with industry and government stakeholders to increase training opportunities that lead to long term employment opportunities.

Monitor and implement agreed strategies in collaboration with Government.

Result and Analysis

Ongoing as required

Attend Mining Liaison Committee meetings, and provide accurate advice on potential environmental impacts, and benefits of potential exploration and mining licence applications

Meetings attended and narrative on outcomes.

Result and Analysis

During the reporting period the Land Council arranged and attended four highly productive Mining Liaison Meetings with GEMCO (South 32) as per the requirements under the Mining/Exploration Agreements held between the Anindilyakwa Land Council and GEMCO

Continue to improve systems and resources to increase efficiency in these processes year by year.

Narrative on increasing efficiency and reduction in red tape across royalty recipient corporations,

Result and Analysis

During the year, the RDU commenced providing Accounting and Reporting services for 8 Corporations and businesses. This role is expanding.

Utilise funds received from GEMCO as a result of recent mining and exploration lease approvals to make major investments in economic and commercial activities on the Groote Archipelago consistent with the conditions agreed by GEMCO and the ALC over the use of these negotiated royalties.

Description of the activities for which the funds have been utilised Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

$833,071 of Mining agreement funds were paid to Aboriginal Corporations to support their economic and commercial initiatives.

Future Groote Accord

Narrative on progress, achievements and benefits Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

While Royalty funded Aboriginal Corporations declined to sign up the "Future Groote Accord" providing for monitoring and evaluation they nevertheless participate in the "Future Groote Strategy" meetings which focus on overall ALC strategies

Groote Eylandt Local Decision making Agreement

Details on the extent of transfer of decision making powers and service delivery. Monitoring and Evaluation of the agreement’s progress Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

The ALC has executed implementation plans with the NT Government under the Local Decision Making Agreement in respect of Housing, Economic Development, Education and Law, Justice and Rehabilitation.

Social Ventures Australia has been engaged by the ALC to work with all stakeholders on the Groote Archipelago to deliver on commitments in these implementation plans.

Program 10.4 Advocacy Services.

To advocate on behalf of the TOs of the Groote Archipelago and to express TOs’ views

Assist Aboriginal Corporations to secure economic, social and cultural benefits for TOs from developments taking place on the Groote Archipelago

RDU reportable outcomes extracted from “Traffic Light Report”. Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

See narrative above under “Process applications for consent to explore and mine on Indigenous land” While Royalty funded Aboriginal Corporations declined to sign up the "Future Groote Accord" providing for monitoring and evaluation they nevertheless participate in the "Future Groote Strategy" meetings which focus on overall ALC strategies

Empower TOs to carry out commercial activities and build sustainable enterprises

RDU reportable outcomes extracted from “Traffic Light Report” Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

While Royalty funded Aboriginal Corporations declined to sign up the "Future Groote Accord" providing for monitoring and evaluation they nevertheless participate in the "Future Groote Strategy" meetings which focus on overall ALC strategies.

15% of Statutory Royalty Equivalents ($8,490,501) were directed to Public Infrastructure and 11% ($6,405,500) to Economic Development projects in 2019-20

Actively support the establishment of Aboriginal Corporations, businesses, and commercial entities

RDU reportable outcomes extracted from “Traffic Light Report” Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

There are currently 21 Aboriginal Corporations operating at varying levels of activity on the archipelago, 10 of which were approved payments from Statutory Royalty equivalents or negotiated royalties in 2019-20.

Provide up to date information on issues affecting Traditional Owners through the ALC’s “Ayakwa Newsletter” and other publications

Number of publications

Result and Analysis

The ALC ceased production of “Ayakwa Newsletter” finding that it was less accessible and less acceptable than electronic and social media, as most Groote Eylandt people have mobile phones and are extensive users.

The publicly accessible web page https://www.anindilyakwa.com.au/media/videos produced:-

Important Coronavirus information in language and Local Decision Making information video and provides a link with a link to many highly relevant items and sites at https://www.anindilyakwasafe.net/d/ ,detailed chronologically at https://www.anindilyakwasafe.net/d/calendarview commencing at 9 March 2020. Other items produced appear at https://www.anindilyakwa.com.au/news

Raise public awareness of the ALC’s statutory role.

Engagements with ORIC bodies and media announcements

Result and Analysis

The ALC engages with funded Aboriginal Corporations under Future Groote Strategy Meetings. See response under Provide up to date information on issues affecting Traditional Owners through the ALC’s “Ayakwa Newsletter” and other publications

Use the RDU to:

Strengthen the ALC’s commercial advocacy and negotiating capabilities.

RDU reportable outcomes extracted from Traffic Light Report.

Result and Analysis

The RDU now has a number of Aboriginal Corporations seeking funding for Commercial and other activity from Statutory Royalty Equivalents. The ALC’s capacity under RDU allows for a greater range of activities to be considered and influenced by the ALC, in particular those that support the ALC Corporate and Strategic plans

Negotiate agreements that provide economic and business opportunities to Traditional Owners.

RDU reportable outcomes extracted from Traffic Light Report.

Result and Analysis.

See respond under "Groote Eylandt Local Decision making Agreement"

Enter into partnership arrangements with, and support Aboriginal Corporations within the ALC region.

RDU reportable outcomes extracted from Traffic Light Report.

Result and Analysis

The “Future Groote” initiative was commenced in 2015-16, with a view to achieving an accord between all Aboriginal Corporations accessing Statutory Royalty equivalents, and the ALC to guide applications for funding. The ALC Developed the “Future Groote Accord” and “Future Groote Strategy” in the year where it and Aboriginal Corporations and organisations agreed to a number of principles and cooperative arrangements directed to supporting economic and social developments on the archipelago. Work to achieve universal sign up to the accord has not been successful

Assist Aboriginal Corporations to act in accordance with ORIC and other relevant legislation.

RDU reportable outcomes extracted from “Traffic Light Report” Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

At 30 June 2020, no non-compliance with the Registrar has been identified in the reporting period. Those Corporations funded during the reporting period would appear to be compliant, and the ALC is directly assisting 7 corporations administratively.

Assist Aboriginal people to achieve greater community development by facilitating access to leadership and governance programs, resources, infrastructure and government services, and economic and social development.

RDU reportable outcomes extracted from “Traffic Light Report” Monitoring and Evaluation of Royalty funded activity under the Future Groote Accord by Social Ventures Australia

Result and Analysis

Last year saw the introduction of the INDUE card to provide access to that element of direct royalty distributions that are provided to Traditional Owners' personal accounts. This constitutes less than 10% of royalty distributions. Normally access was only available during school holidays to avoid the impact on school attendance that this caused in the past. The INDUE card enables access to these funds prior to the end of term but for specific types of purchases. Any unused amounts are paid into the recipients' accounts under the usual timing. This arrangement has been well received by householders and carers and access to the service has increased to 33% of royalty payments in 2019-20.

Total activities funded by Royalty equivalents over the 6 years 2014-15 to 2019-20 are graphed below, with the 2019-20 details also provided. Of the $73M in S64(3) in 2019-20 less than 10% was distributed as payments into TO's bank accounts and then only at the commencement of School holidays. The increasing use of INDUE cards will reduce this percentage still further as well as providing a boost to those local business accessible to INDUE card holders.

Royalty distribution - purposes since RDU Housing 60,932,180 Telecommunications 11,820,953 Public Infrastructure 49,864,000 Economic Development 45,068,032 ALC Community Support Program 88,303,551 Health 16,367,033 Education 30,522,698 S 64(1) Support 5,182,134 ORIC Staffing and Operational Expenditure 8,325,280 Cultural Protection 34,927,329 Vehicles 1,893,164 Total 353,206,354

Royalty Distribution - purposes 2019-20 Telecommunications 3,858,408 Public Infrastructure 8,990,501 Economic Development 5,905,500.00 ORIC Staffing and Operational Expenditure 2,863,470.00 ALC Community Support Program 11,537,074.00 Health 2,410,000.00 Education 11,513,466.00 Housing 1,555,000.00 Cultural Protection 8,722,551.00 Vehicles 308,164.00 Total 57,664,134.00
Royalty Distribution Comparative amounts 2019-20 TTelecommunications 3,858,408 Public Infrastructure 8,990,501 Economic Development 5,905,500.00 ORIC Staffing and Operational Expenditure 2,863,470.00 ALC Community Support Program 11,537,074.00 Health 2,410,000.00 Education 11,513,466.00 Housing 1,555,000.00 Cultural Protection 8,722,551.00 Vehicles 308,164.00 Total 57,664,134.00